September Quotes

  • The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds the most discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' (I found it!) but 'That's funny...'

    - Isaac Asimov
  • There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There is another theory which states that this has already happened.

    - Douglas Adams
  • There is no death. Only a change of worlds.

    - Chief Seattle
  • Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

    - John Benfield
  • The only reason some people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.

    - Paul Fix
  • Maybe you have to know darkness before you can appreciate the light.

    - Madeleine L'Engle
  • Formerly, when religion was strong and science weak, men mistook magic for medicine; now, when science is strong and religion weak, men mistake medicine for magic.

    - Thomas Szasz
  • The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.

    - Dorothy Parker
  • Why are our days numbered and not, say, lettered?

    - Woody Allen
  • Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • Some weasel took the cork out of my lunch.

    - W. C. Fields
  • This country has come to feel the same when Congress is in session as when the baby gets hold of a hammer.

    - Will Rogers
  • My toughest fight was with my first wife.

    - Muhammad Ali
  • No idea is so antiquated that it was not once modern; no idea is so modernthat it will not someday be antiquated.

    - Ellen Glasgow
  • Of course, our failures are a consequence of many factors, but possibly one of the most important is the fact that society operates on the theory that specialization is the key to success, not realizing that specialization precludes comprehensive thinking.

    - R. Buckminster Fuller
  • I bought some batteries, but they weren't included.

    - Steven Wright
  • It matters not whether you win or lose; what matters is whether I win or lose.

    - Darrin Weinberg
  • This is our purpose: to make as meaningful as possible this life that has been bestowed upon us; to live in such a way that we may be proud of ourselves; to act in such a way that some part of us lives on.

    - Oswald Spengler
  • EVERY path may lead you to God, even the weird ones. Most of us are on a journey. We’re looking for something, though we’re not always sure what that is. The way is foggy much of the time. I suggest you slow down and follow some of the side roads that appear suddenly in the mist.

    - Real Live Preacher
  • The return from your work must be the satisfaction which that work brings you and the world's need of that work. With this, life is heaven, or as close to heaven as you can get. Without this - with work which you despise, which bores you can which the world does not need - this life is hell.

    - W. E. B. Du Bois
  • Slow down and enjoy life. It's not only the scenery you miss by going too fast - you also miss the sense of where you are going and why.

    - Eddie Cantor
  • A classic is a book that doesn't have to be written again.

    - W. E. B. Du Bois
  • My Karma ran over your dogma.

    - Unknown
  • The bond that links your true family is not one of blood, but of respect and joy in each other's life. Rarely do members of one family grow up under the same roof.

    - Richard Bach
  • It is better to have loved and lost than never to have lost at all.

    - Samuel Butler
  • A doctor can bury his mistakes but an architect can only advise his client to plant vines.

    - Frank Lloyd Wright
  • Never doubt that a small, group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.

    - Margaret Mead
  • Buy on the rumor; sell on the news.

    - Wall Street Proverb
  • If all the rich people in the world divided up their money among themselves there wouldn't be enough to go around.

    - Christina Stead
  • If you don't get a kick out of the job you are doing you'd better hunt another one.

    - Samuel Vauclain
  • I thoroughly disapprove of duels. If a man should challenge me, I would take him kindly and forgivingly by the hand and lead him to a quiet place and kill him.

    - Mark Twain
  • The world is full of suffering but it is also full of people overcoming it.

    - Helen Keller
  • Biography lends to death a new terror.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • For none of us can ever express the exact measure of his needs or his thoughts or his sorrows; and human speech is like a cracked kettle on which we tap crude rhythms for bears to dance to, while we long to make music that will melt the stars.

    - Gustave Flaubert
  • The wise man does not permit himself to set up even in his own mind any comparisons of his friends. His friendship is capable of going to extremes with many people, evoked as it is by many qualities.

    - Charles Dudley Warner
  • Do not condemn the judgement of another because it differs from your own. You may both be wrong.

    - Dandemis
  • It is not enough to succeed. Others must fail.

    - Gore Vidal
  • There are three things which if one does not know, one cannot live long in the world: what is too much for one, what is too little for one, and what is just right for one.

    - Swahili Proverb
  • Lead the life that will make you kindly and friendly to everyone about you, and you will be surprised what a happy life you will lead.

    - Charles M. Schwab
  • The first sign of corruption in a society that is still alive is that the end justifies the means.

    - Georges Bernanos
  • Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read.

    - Frank Zappa
  • Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.

    - Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • I do not have a psychiatrist and I do not want one, for the simple reason that if he listened to me long enough, he might become disturbed.

    - James Thurber
  • There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening, that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all time, this expression is unique. And if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium and will be lost.

    - Martha Graham
  • Reality is the leading cause of stress amongst those in touch with it.

    - Jane Wagner
  • Think of yourself as an incandescent power, illuminated and perhaps forever talked to by God and his messengers.

    - Brenda Ueland
  • Realism...has no more to do with reality than anything else.

    - Hob Broun
  • A friend might well be reckoned the masterpiece of nature.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • However often you may have done them a favour, if you once refuse they forget everything except your refusal.

    - Pliny The Younger
  • Forgiveness is the fragrance the violet sheds on the heel that has crushed it.

    - Author Unknown
  • Words are the leaves of the tree of language, of which, if some fall away, a new succession takes their place.

    - Field Marshall John French
  • We always like those who admire us; we do not always like those whom we admire.

    - Francois De La Rochefoucauld
  • The best way to keep one's word is not to give it.

    - Napoleon Bonaparte
  • When I was a boy I was told that anybody could become President. Now I'm beginning to believe it.

    - Clarence Darrow
  • To fall in love you have to be in the state of mind for it to take, like a disease.

    - Nancy Mitford
  • Bear in mind, if you are going to amount to anything, that your success does not depend upon the brilliancy and the impetuosity with which you take hold, but upon the ever lasting and sanctified bulldoggedness with which you hang on after you have taken hold.

    - Dr. A. B. Meldrum
  • Any fool can criticize, condemn, and complain - and most fools do.

    - Dale Carnegie
  • We do not learn by inference and deduction and the application of mathematics to philosophy, but by direct intercourse and sympathy.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • As I was walking up the stairI met a man who wasn't there.He wasn't there again today.I wish, I wish he'd stay away.

    - Hughes Mearns
  • There are people who make things happen,those who watch what happens,and those who wonder what happened.

    - Unknown
  • Keep your fears to yourself, but share your courage with others.

    - Robert Louis Stevenson
  • If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man.

    - Mark Twain
  • Look to your health; and if you have it, praise God and value it next to conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of, a blessing money can't buy.

    - Izaak Walton
  • The only person you should ever compete with is yourself. You can't hope for a fairer match.

    - Todd Ruthman
  • Lying increases the creative faculties, expands the ego, and lessens the frictions of social contacts.

    - Clare Booth Luce
  • I can name the newscaster on The Simpsons, but I can't name my own congressman. And that's what makes America great.

    - Mark Hoppus
  • It violates right order whenever capital so employees the working or wage-earning classes as to divert business and economic activity entirely to its own arbitrary will and advantage without, the social character of economic life, social justice, and the common good.

    - Pope Pius Xi
  • If thy words be too luxuriant, confine them, lest they confine thee. He that thinks he can never speak enough, may easily speak too much. A full tongue and an empty brain are seldom parted.

    - Francis Quarles
  • The pride of youth is in strength and beauty, the pride of old age is in discretion.

    - Democritus
  • Remember happiness doesn't depend upon who you are or what you have; it depends solely on what you think.

    - Dale Carnegie
  • In dwelling, live close to the ground.In thinking, keep to the simple.In conflict, be fair and generous.In governing, don't try to control.In work, do what you enjoy.In family life, be completely present.

    - Tao Te Ching
  • Practice, the master of all things.

    - Augustus Octavius
  • Make the best use of what is in your power, and take the rest as it happens.

    - Epictetus
  • Neurotics build castles in the air, psychotics live in them. My mother cleans them.

    - Rita Rudner
  • People seldom see the halting and painful steps by which the most insignificant success is achieved.

    - Anne Sullivan
  • Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge?Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?

    - T. S. Eliot
  • Real education should educate us out of self into something far finer; into a selflessness which links us with all humanity.

    - Nancy Astor
  • Sure there are dishonest men in local government. But there are dishonest men in national government too.

    - Richard M. Nixon
  • Every one wishes to have truth on his side, but it is not everyone sincerely wishes to be on the side of truth.

    - Richard Whatley
  • A thought is often original, though you have uttered it a hundred times.

    - Oliver Wendell Holmes
  • If a problem has no solution, it may not be a problem, but a fact - not to be solved, but to be coped with over time.

    - Shimon Peres
  • Of all the nonsense that twists the world, the concept of 'altruism' is the worst. People do what they want to do, every time.

    - Robert Heinlein
  • The cat could very well be man's best friend but would never stoop to admitting it.

    - Doug Larson
  • The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.

    - Mahatma Gandhi
  • Whenever you are asked if you can do a job, tell 'em, 'Certainly I can!' Then get busy and find out how to do it.

    - Theodore Roosevelt
  • Either this man is dead or my watch has stopped.

    - Groucho Marx
  • Love yourself first and everything else falls into line.

    - Lucille Ball
  • Life is far too important a thing ever to talk seriously about.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • Do not accustom yourself to use big words for little matters.

    - Samuel Johnson
  • If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things.

    - Rene Descartes
  • It is better to sit alone than in company with the bad; and it is, better still to sit with the good than alone. It is better to speak to a seeker of knowledge than to remain silent; but silence is better than idle words.

    - Prophet Muhammad
  • If there are no stupid questions, then what kind of questions do stupid people ask? Do they get smart just in time to ask questions?

    - Scott Adams
  • I would rather be ashes than dust. I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by a dryrot. I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in a magnificient glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.

    - Jack London
  • His mother had often said, When you choose an action, you choose the consequences of that action. She had emphasized the corollary of this axiom even more vehemently: when you desired a consequence you had damned well better take the action that would create it.

    - Lois Mcmaster Bujold
  • Wealth is the slave of a wise man. The master of a fool.

    - Seneca
  • Nothing astonishes men so much as common sense and plain dealing.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • An inventor is simply a fellow who doesn't take his education too seriously.

    - Charles F. Kettering
  • Don't bend; don't water it down; don't try to make it logical; don't edit your own soul according to the fashion. Rather, follow your most intense obsessions mercilessly.

    - Franz Kafka
  • If you talk enough, you don't feel you have to _do_ anything.

    - John Updike's Mother
  • The living need charity more than the dead.

    - George Arnold
  • After all it is those who have a deep and real inner life who are best able to deal with the irritating details of outer life.

    - Evelyn Underhill
  • Talent develops in tranquillity, character in the full current of human life.

    - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • There exists no politician in India daring enough to attempt to explain to the masses that cows can be eaten.

    - Indira Gandhi
  • I think the world is run by 'C' students.

    - Al Mcguire
  • It isn't necessary to have relatives in Kansas City in order to be unhappy.

    - Groucho Marx
  • Genius may have its limitations, but stupidity is not thus handicapped.

    - Elbert Hubbard
  • If you want to see the true measure of a man, watch how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • 'Tis better to have loved and lostThan never to have loved at all.

    - Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  • A person may cause evil to others not only by his actions but by his inaction, and in either case he is justly accountable to them for the injury.

    - John Stuart Mill
  • Cannibals prefer those who have no spines.

    - Stanislaw Lem
  • I you don't have a leg to stand on, you can't put your foot down.

    - Dave Weinbaum
  • Rock and roll is the hamburger that ate the world.

    - Peter York
  • Are you going to come quietly, or do I have to use earplugs?

    - Spike Milligan
  • Science is the record of dead religions.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • Humor is the great thing, the saving thing. The minute it crops up, all our irritations and resentments slip away, and a sunny spirit takes their place.

    - Mark Twain
  • Death is not extinguishing the light; it is putting out the lamp because the dawn has come.

    - Rabindranath Tagore
  • Let no man imagine that he has no influence. Whoever he may be, and wherever he may be placed, the man who thinks becomes a light and a power.

    - Henry George
  • As long as the world shall last there will be wrongs, and if no man objected and no man rebelled, those wrongs would last forever.

    - Clarence Darrow
  • After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.

    - Aldous Huxley
  • Some day my boat will come in, and with my luck I'll be at the airport.

    - Graffito
  • The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Gods are fragile things; they may be killed by a whiff of science or a dose of common sense.

    - Chapman Cohen
  • Money, which represents the prose of life, and which is hardly spoken of in parlors without an apology, is, in its effects and laws, as beautiful as roses.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • You get the best out of others when you give the best of yourself.

    - Harvey Firestone
  • Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off the goal.

    - Hannah More
  • The reward for a thing well done is to have done it.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • From their experience or from the recorded experience of others (history), men learn only what their passions and their metaphysical prejudices allow them to learn.

    - Aldous Huxley
  • Truth has not special time of its own. Its hour is now -- always and indeed then most truly when it seems unsuitable to actual circumstances.

    - Albert Schweitzer
  • Before beginning a Hunt, it is wise to ask someone what you are looking for before you begin looking for it.

    - Pooh's Little Instruction Book
  • Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved.

    - Helen Keller
  • ...A good book is the precious lifeblood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life.

    - John Milton
  • He who has never failed somewhere. . . that man can not be great.

    - Herman Melville
  • The beginning is the most important part of the work.

    - Plato
  • Occasionally, I have to think like myself to remember where I put something.

    - Sue S. Taylor
  • Existence would be intolerable if we were never to dream.

    - Anatole France
  • Only when the last tree has been cut downOnly when the last river has been poisonedOnly when the last fish has been caughtOnly then will you find that money cannot be eaten.

    - Cree Indian Prophecy
  • Children have more need of models than of critics.

    - Joseph Joubert
  • Tomorrow is the day when idlers work, and fool reform, and mortal men lay hold on heaven.

    - Young
  • My father taught me to work; he did not teach me to love it.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • Pride does not wish to owe and vanity does not wish to pay.

    - Francois De La Rochefoucauld
  • Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy.

    - Anne Frank
  • History is the short trudge from Adam to atom.

    - Leonard Louis Levinson
  • At points of clarity, I realize that my life on earth is meaningless, and that I am merely a pawn in a bigger game. A game I cannot possible understand or have control of. Thankfully, before depression sets in, I drift back into my cloudy, bewildered daily routine.

    - Joel Patrick Warneke
  • Forget your enemies. It's your friends you frustrate that cause all the problems.

    - Michael J. Tucker
  • Nothing happens unless first a dream.

    - Carl Sandburg
  • Imagination is more important than knowledge...

    - Albert Einstein
  • If you can solve your problem, then what is the need of worrying? If you cannot solve it, then what is the use of worrying?

    - Shantideva
  • Perfect as the wing of a bird may be, it will never enable the bird to fly if unsupported by the air. Facts are the air of science. Without them a man of science can never rise.

    - Ivan Pavlov
  • I cannot teach you violence, as I do not myself believe in it. I can only teach you not to bow your heads before any one even at the cost of your life.

    - Mahatma Gandhi
  • Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.

    - Aristotle
  • Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • You have to have confidence in your ability, and then be tough enough to follow through.

    - Rosalynn Carter
  • What we anticipate seldom occurs; what we least expected generally happens.

    - Benjamin Disraeli
  • There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion.

    - Carl Jung
  • You are going to let the fear of poverty govern your life and your reward will be that you will eat, but you will not live.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • Ideals are like stars: you will not succeed in touching them with your hands, but like the seafaring man on the ocean desert of waters, you choose them as your guides, and following them, you reach your destiny.

    - Carl Schurz
  • A little learning is a dangerous thing but a lot of ignorance is just as bad.

    - Bob Edwards
  • War is not nice.

    - Barbara Bush
  • This above all: to thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.

    - William Shakespeare
  • A child only educated at school is an uneducated child.

    - George Santayana
  • While one person hesitates because he feels inferior, the other is busy making mistakes and becoming superior.

    - Henry C. Link
  • Wonder is what sets us apart from other life forms. No other species wonders about the meaning of existence or the complexity of the universe or themselves.

    - Herbert W. Boyer
  • Young people have an almost biological destiny to be hopeful.

    - Marshall Ganz
  • If studidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?

    - Will Rogers
  • Almost all absurdity of conduct arises from the imitation of those whom we cannot resemble.

    - Samuel Johnson
  • When a man says he approves of something in principle, it means he hasn't the slightest intention of putting it into practice.

    - Otto Von Bismarck
  • I love quotations because it is a joy to find thoughts one might have, beautifully expressed with much authority by someone recognized wiser than oneself.

    - Marlene Dietrich
  • You grow up the day you have your first real laugh -- at yourself.

    - Ethel Barrymore
  • Words -- so innocent and powerless as they are, as standing in a dictionary, how potent for good and evil they become in the hands of one who knows how to combine them.

    - Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Many people seem to think that opportunity means a chance to get money without earning it.

    - Author Unknown
  • It is possible to fly without motors, but not without knowledge and skill.

    - Wilbur Wright
  • If you are near the enemy, make him believe you are far from him.If you are far from the enemy, make him believe you are near.

    - Sun Tzu
  • Laziness is nothing more than the habit of resting before you get tired.

    - Jules Renard
  • To learn to get along without, to realize that what the world is going to demand of us may be a good deal more important than what we are entitled to demand of it - this is a hard lesson.

    - Bruce Catton
  • Great minds have purposes, others have wishes.

    - Washington Irving
  • When of a gossiping circle it was asked, "What are they doing?" The answer was, "Swapping lies."

    - Richard Brinsley Sheridan
  • Time invested in improving ourselves cuts down on time wasted in disapproving of others.

    - Author Unknown
  • People who bite the hand that feeds them usually lick the boot that kicks them.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • All our progress is an unfolding, like a vegetable bud. You have first an instinct, then an opinion, then a knowledge as the plant has root, bud, and fruit. Trust the instinct to the end, though you can render no reason.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Opportunities are often missed because we are broadcasting when we should be listening.

    - Author Unknown
  • We don't bother much about dress and manners in England, because as a nation we don't dress well and we've no manners.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • Don't use a big word where a diminutive one will suffice.

    - Unknown
  • After the last of 16 mounting screws has been removed from an access cover, it will be discovered that the wrong access cover has been removed.

    - De La Lastra's Law
  • Art is not a handicraft, it is the transmission of feeling the artist has experienced.

    - Leo Tolstoy
  • The only gift is a portion of thyself.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • In jealousy there is more of self-love, than of love to another.

    - Francois De La Rochefoucauld
  • It is always the best policy to tell the truth, unless, of course, you are an exceptionally good liar.

    - Jerome K Jerome
  • This art of resting the mind and the power of dismissing from it all care and worry is probably one of the secrets of energy in our great men.

    - Captain J. A. Hadfield
  • Love is a perky elf dancing a merry little jig, then suddenly he turns on you with a miniature machine gun.

    - Matt Groening
  • Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.

    - Mark Twain
  • Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it.

    - Søren Kierkegaard
  • No man can be happy without a friend, nor be sure of his friend until he is unhappy.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • One day at a time- this is enough. Do not look back and grieve over the past, for it is gone; and do not be troubled about the future, for it has not yet come. Live in the present, and make it so beautiful that it will be worth remembering.

    - Ida Scott Taylor.
  • The great advantage of being in a rut is that when one is in a rut, one knows exactly where one is.

    - Arnold Bennett
  • Verbosity leads to unclear, inarticulate things.

    - Dan Quayle
  • Do the thing we fear, and death of fear is certain.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Our observation of nature must be diligent, our reflection profound, and our experiments exact. We rarely see these three means combined; and for this reason, creative geniuses are not common.

    - Denis Diderot
  • That is the true season of love, when we believe that we alone can love, that no one could ever have loved so before us, and that no one will love in the same way after us.

    - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • The thing women have got to learn is that nobody gives you power. You just take it.

    - Roseanne Barr
  • Performance is your reality. Forget everything else.

    - Harold Geneen
  • Youth, which is forgiven everything, forgives itself nothing: age, which forgives itself everything, is forgiven nothing.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • The worst moment for the atheist is when he is really thankful and has nobody to thank.

    - Dante Gabriel Rossetti
  • The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched. They must be felt.

    - Unknown
  • Truth is a fire that burns and shines.

    - Gustav Klimt
  • The supreme end of education is expert discernment in all things--the power to tell the good from the bad, the genuine from the counterfeit, and to prefer the good and the genuine to the bad and the counterfeit.

    - John Wilson
  • Never try to reason the prejudice out of a man. It was not reasoned into him, and cannot be reasoned out.

    - Sydney Smith
  • Be honorable yourself if you wish to associate with honorable people.

    - Welsh Proverb
  • It is no use saying, "We are doing our best." You have got to succeed in doing what is necessary.

    - Sir Winston Churchill
  • No man has a good enough memory to make a successful liar.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • Train up a fig tree in the way it should go, and when you are old sit under the shade of it.

    - Charles Dickens
  • The right to swing my fist ends where the other man's nose begins.

    - Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.
  • The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation's history. I mean in this century's history. But we all lived in this century. I didn't live in this century.

    - Dan Quayle
  • Don't be content by just beating others expectations, beat your own expectations as well. And you should expect nothing less but to win.

    - Beau M. Jackson
  • Courage is the price that Life exacts for granting peace.

    - Amelia Earhart
  • In the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make.

    - The Beatles
  • Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing.

    - Albert Schweitzer
  • Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards.

    - Vernon Sanders Law
  • The only thing that sustains one through life is the consciousness of the immense inferiority of everybody else, and this is a feeling I have always cultivated.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • If Beethoven had been killed in a plane crash at the age of 22, it would have changed the history of music... and of aviation.

    - Tom Stoppard
  • I keep pointing at the child; they keep staring at my finger.

    - Maria Montessori
  • The reason grandparents and grandchildren get along so well is that they have a common enemy.

    - Sam Levenson
  • There was a time when we expected nothing of our children but obedience, as opposed to the present, when we expect everything of them but obedience.

    - Anatole Broyard
  • Do you know what is better than charity and fasting and prayer? It is keeping peace and good relations between people, as quarrels and bad feelings destroy mankind.

    - Prophet Muhammad
  • I hate women because they always know where things are.

    - James Thurber
  • We can have facts without thinking but we cannot have thinking without facts.

    - John Dewey
  • My wife's jealousy is getting ridiculous. The other day she looked at my calendar and wanted to know who May was.

    - Rodney Dangerfield
  • Creativity is a drug I cannot live without.

    - Cecil B. Demille
  • Absence sharpens love, presence strengthens it.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • Be such a man, and live such a life, that if every man were such as you, and every life a life like yours, this earth would be God's Paradise.

    - Phillips Brooks
  • Seriousness is the only refuge of the shallow.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within.

    - Miguel De Cervantes
  • Sow and act and you reap a habit; sow a habit and you reap a character; sow a character and you reap destiny.

    - Frances E. Willard
  • The more you know, the harder it is to take decisive action. Once you become informed, you start seeing complexities and shades of gray. You realize that nothing is as clear and simple as it first appears. Ultimately, knowledge is paralyzing.

    - Bill Watterson
  • A life spent making mistakes is not only most honorable but more useful than a life spent doing nothing.

    - Unknown
  • Cabbage: A familiar kitchen-garden vegetable about as large and wise as a man's head.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • The stream of thought flows on; but most of its segments fall into the bottomless abyss of oblivion. Of some, no memory survives the instant of their passage. Of others, it is confined to a few moments, hours or days. Others, again, leave vestiges which are indestructible, and by means of which they may be recalled as long as life endures.

    - William James
  • When I think of talking, it is of course with a woman. For talking at its best being an inspiration, it wants a corresponding divine quality of receptiveness, and where will you find this but in a woman?

    - Oliver Wendell Holmes
  • Eating is always a decision, nobody forces your hand to pick up food and put it into your mouth.

    - Albert Ellis, Michael Abrams, Lidia Dengelegi
  • Love is an attachment to another self. Humor is a form of self-detachment -- a way of looking at one's existence, one's misfortune, or one's discomfort. If you really love, if you really know how to laugh, the result is the same: you forget yourself.

    - Claude Roy
  • Alcohol is a very necessary article... It makes life bearable to millions of people who could not endure their existence if they were quite sober. It enables Parliament to do things at eleven at night that no sane person would do at eleven in the morning.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • To my embarrassment I was born in bed with a lady.

    - Wilson Mizner
  • People are like stained glass windows; they sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is light within.

    - Elisabeth Kubler-Ross
  • Most people would rather be certain they're miserable, than risk being happy.

    - Robert Anthony
  • It is by the goodness of God that in our country we have those three unspeakably precious things: freedom of speech, freedom of conscience, and the prudence never to practice either of them.

    - Mark Twain
  • Some of the world's greatest feats were accomplished by people not smart enought to know they were impossible.

    - Doug Larson
  • You only live once; but if you live it right, once is enough.

    - Adam Marshall
  • Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering.

    - Yoda
  • A man does not have to be an angel in order to be saint.

    - Albert Schweitzer
  • I am patient with stupidity, but not with those who are proud of it.

    - Edith Sitwell
  • Tread softly, because you tread on my dreams.

    - William Butler Yeats
  • The brave man is not without fear, the brave man does what he must despite his fear.

    - Mark Anthony
  • In every child who is born under no matter what circumstances and of no matter what parents, the potentiality of the human race is born again, and in him, too, once more, and each of us, our terrific responsibility toward human life: toward the utmost idea of goodness, of the horror of terrorism, and of God.

    - James Agee
  • Any time you pull down a fence, always ask why it was put there in the first place.

    - G. K. Chesterton
  • It's very easy to feel someone's pain when you love them.

    - Salma Hayek
  • There's only so much you can do, but if somebody doesn't give you a chance there is nothing you can do.

    - Charlize Theron
  • Bygone troubles are a pleasure to talk about.

    - Yiddish Proverb
  • He who divides and shares is left with the best share.

    - American Proverb
  • Nobody will ever win the Battle of the Sexes. There's just too much fraternizing with the enemy.

    - Henry Kissinger
  • It was we, the people; not we, the white male citizens; nor yet we, the male citizens; but we, the whole people, who formed the Union.... Men, their rights and nothing more; women, their rights and nothing less.

    - Susan B. Anthony
  • Disinterested intellectual curiosity is the life blood of real civilization.

    - G. M. Trevelyan
  • We should every night call ourselves to an account; What infirmity have I mastered today? What passions opposed? What temptation resisted? What virtue acquired? Our vices will abort of themselves if they be brought every day to the shrift.

    - Seneca
  • We have too many high sounding words, and too few actions that correspond with them.

    - Abigail Adams
  • I have plentyof common sense! I just choose to ignore it.

    - Bill Watterson
  • I dream for a living.

    - Steven Spielberg
  • Men are taught to apologize for their weaknesses, women for their strengths.

    - Lois Wyse
  • Just as despair can come to one only from other human beings, hope, too, can be given to one only by other human beings.

    - Elie Wiesel
  • Sports do not build character. They reveal it.

    - Heywood Broun
  • Feelings are real and legitimate; children behave and misbehave for a reason, even if adults cannot figure it out.

    - Unknown
  • We immediately become more effective when we decide to change ourselves rather than asking things to change for us.

    - Stephen Covey
  • SUCCESS, n. The one unpardonable sin against one's fellows. In literature, and particularly in poetry, the elements of success are exceedingly simple, and are admirably set forth in the following lines by the reverend Father Gassalasca Jape, entitled, for some mysterious reason, "John A. Joyce."The bard who would prosper must carry a book,Do his thinking in prose and wearA crimson cravat, a far-away lookAnd a head of hexameter hair.Be thin in your thought and your body'll be fat;If you wear your hair long you needn't your hat.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • JUSTICE, n. A commodity which is a more or less adulterated condition the State sells to the citizen as a reward for his allegiance, taxes and personal service.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts about reality.

    - Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • Humor is everywhere, in that there's irony in just about anything a human does.

    - Bill Nye
  • Youth is happy because it has the capacity to see beauty. Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.

    - Franz Kafka
  • Tempt not a desperate man.

    - Shakespeare
  • No nice men are good at getting taxis.

    - Katharine Whitehorn
  • Getting along with men isn't what's truly important. The vital knowledge is how to get along with one man.

    - Phyllis Mcginley
  • Nothing is illegal if one hundred businessmen decide to do it.

    - Andrew Young
  • "What made the deepest impression upon you?" inquired a friend one day of Lincoln, "when you stood in the presence of the Falls of Niagara, the greatest of natural wonders?" ---- "The thing that stuck me most forcibly when I saw the Falls," Lincoln responded with the characteristic deliberation, "was where in the world did all that water come from?"

    - Author Unknown
  • The strength of women comes from the fact that psychology cannot explain us. Men can be analyzed, women… merely adored.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • So divinely is the world organized that every one of us, in our place and time, is in balance with everything else.

    - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • The best way to divulge a secret is to tell someone not to say anything about it.

    - Charles Fleischer
  • A conscience is what hurts when all your other parts feel so good.

    - Anonymous
  • Because he has never forgiven himself any fault, he can forgive no one else's.

    - Linda Berdoll
  • The most gifted members of the human species are at their creative best when they cannot have their way, and must compensate for what they miss by realizing and cultivating their capacities and talents.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • The old lie; Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.(Sweet and fitting it is to die for the fatherland)

    - Wilfred Owen
  • The head never rules the heart, but just becomes its partner in crime.

    - Mignon Mclaughlin
  • It is your attitude at the beginning of a task that determines success or failure.

    - Corrine Dewlow
  • The trick is not how much pain you feel - but how much joy you feel. Any idiot can feel pain. Life is full of excuses to feel pain, excuses not to live, excuses, excuses, excuses.

    - Erica Jong
  • It is only possible to live happily ever after on a day-to-day basis.

    - Margaret Bonnano
  • All my possessions for a moment of time.

    - Elizabeth I
  • Traveling there was really boring so I headed for the ditch. It was a rough ride but I met more interesting people there.

    - Neil Young
  • I've got a twisted sense of humor, and everything amuses me.

    - Robert Heinlein
  • A mistake may mark a man, but admiting a mistake is the mark of a man.

    - Zak Vora
  • Reverence for life brings us into a spiritual relation with the world which is independent of all knowledge of the universe.

    - Albert Schweitzer
  • It doesn't matter if you win or lose in the big, scary jungle of the real world. Winners and losers... Enemies and allies... We don't live in a comic book! This is the real deal.

    - Takayuki Ikkaku, Arisa Hosaka And Toshihiro Kawabata
  • All the things I really like to do are either illegal, immoral, or fattening.

    - Alexander Woollcott
  • The only devils in this world are those running around in our own hearts, and that is where all our battles should be fought.

    - Mahatma Gandhi
  • PITIFUL, adj. The state of an enemy of opponent after an imaginary encounter with oneself.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • About the time we can make ends meet, somebody moves the ends.

    - Herbert Hoover
  • Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,Old Time is still a-flying;And this same flower that smiles today,Tomorrow will be dying.

    - Robert Herrick
  • Of all the gods, Death only craves not gifts:Nor sacrifice, nor yet drink-offering pouredAvails; no altars hath he, nor is soothedBy hymns of praise. From him alone of allThe powers of heaven Persuasion holds aloof.

    - Aeschylus
  • Life is made up of constant calls to action, and we seldom have time for more than hastily contrived answers.

    - Learned Hand
  • Shall ignorance of good and illDare to direct the eternal will?Seek virtue, and of that possest,To Providence resign the rest.

    - Gay
  • He is happiest who hath power to gather wisdom from a flower.

    - Mary Howitt
  • I prefer liberty to chains of diamonds.

    - Lady Mary Wortley Montagu
  • Sanity is a cozy lie.

    - Susan Sontag
  • If scientific reasoning were limited to the logical processes of arithmetic, we should not get very far in our understanding of the physical world. One might as well attempt to grasp the game of poker entirely by the use of the mathematics of probability.

    - Vannevar Bush
  • They say that women talk too much. If you have worked in congress you know that the filibuster was invented by men.

    - Clare Booth Luce
  • Quarrel not at all. No man resolved to make the most of himself can spare time for personal contention.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • Reflect on your present blessings, of which every man has many; not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

    - Charles Dickens
  • Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.

    - Sir Francis Bacon
  • What if nothing exists and we're all in somebody's dream? Or what's worse, what if only that fat guy in the third row exists?

    - Woody Allen
  • The First Lady is an unpaid public servant elected by one person --- her husband.

    - Lady Bird Johnson
  • It is by not always thinking of yourself, if you can manage it, that you might somehow be happy. Until you can make room in your life for someone as important to you as yourself, you will always be searching and lost....

    - Richard Bach
  • I’m telling you, things are getting out of hand. Or maybe I’m discovering that things were never in my hands.

    - Real Live Preacher
  • The very essence of love is uncertainty.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • Going to work for a large company is like getting on a train - Are you going sixty miles an hour or is the train going sixty miles an hour and you're just sitting still?

    - J. Paul Getty
  • He conquers who endures.

    - Persius
  • If the truth be known, most successes are built on a multitude of failures.

    - Author Unknown
  • I was gratified to be able to answer promptly. I said I don't know.

    - Mark Twain
  • We need never be ashamed of our tears.

    - Charles Dickens
  • It is chiefly through books that we enjoy intercourse with superior minds, and these invaluable means of communication are in the reach of all. In the best books, great men talk to us, give us their most precious thoughts, and pour their souls into ours.

    - William Ellery Channing
  • If a pessimist is always right, is he a realist?

    - Unknown
  • It is a very serious duty, perhaps of all duties the most serious, to look into one's own character and conduct, and accurately read one's own heart. It is virtually looking into eternity, and all its vast and solemn realities, which must appear delightful or awful, according as the heart appears to be conformed or not conform to God.

    - Emmons
  • Action may not always bring happiness, but there is no happiness without action.

    - Benjamin Disraeli
  • It is a common enough case, that of a man being suddenly captivated by a woman nearly the opposite of his ideal.

    - George Eliot
  • Do not pray for easy lives. Pray to be stronger men. Do not pray for tasks equal to your powers. Pray for powers equal to your tasks. Then the doing of your work shall be no miracle, but you shall be the miracle.

    - Phillips Brooks
  • Behind almost every woman you ever heard of stands a man who let her down.

    - Naomi Bliven
  • Love and hate are not opposites. The opposite of love is indifference.

    - A. S. Neill
  • Keep cool and you command everybody.

    - Louis De Saint-Just
  • Dark and difficult times lie ahead. Soon we must all face the choice between what is right and what is easy.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • It is folly to punish your neighbor by fire when you live next door.

    - Publilius Syrus
  • The fundamental qualities for good execution of a plan is first; intelligence; then discernment and judgment, which enable one to recognize the best method as to attain it; the singleness of purpose; and, lastly, what is most essential of all, will-stubborn will.

    - Ferdinand Foch
  • It is in learning music that many youthful hearts learn to love.

    - Ricard
  • I am certainly not one of those who need to be prodded. In fact, if anything, I am the prod.

    - Sir Winston Churchill
  • If you make the world a little better, then you have accomplished a great deal.

    - Unknown
  • Life... is like a grapefruit. It's orange and squishy, and has a few pips in it, and some folks have half a one for breakfast.

    - Douglas Adams
  • Creativity is the power to connect the seemingly unconnected.

    - William Plomer
  • Whenever people agree with me I always feel I must be wrong.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • If we all did the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves.

    - Thomas A. Edison
  • When two men in business always agree, one of them is unnecessary.

    - William Wrigley Jr.
  • I do nothing but go about persuading you all, old and young alike, not to take thought for your persons or your properties, but and chiefly to care about the greatest improvement of the soul. I tell you that virtue is not given by money, but that from virtue comes money and every other good of man, public as well as private. This is my teaching, and if this is the doctrine which corrupts the youth, I am a mischievous person.

    - Socrates
  • Look wise, say nothing, and grunt. Speech was given to conceal thought.

    - Sir William Osler
  • Perpetual devotion to what a man calls his business, is only to be sustained by perpetual neglect of many other things.

    - Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Perhaps better we not obscure the idea that happiness and misery, kindness and greed, and good works and bad deeds are within the capacities of us all, not merely a select few.

    - David P. Mikkelson
  • Fine words! I wonder where you stole them.

    - Jonathan Swift
  • One person with a belief is equal to a force of 99 who have only interests.

    - John Stuart Mill
  • I want to change the pop world one sequin at a time. Artists tend to take themselves way too seriously and don't enjoy the fun of making an impact on culture. I just have a good time and sequins represent a good time.

    - Lady Gaga
  • The neurotic and the artist - since both live out the unconscious of the race - reveal to us what is going to emerge endemically in the society later on.

    - Rollo May
  • Make yourself necessary to somebody. Do not make life hard to any.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • There's a right way and a wrong way to do things. If you make a chair, you want to make a nice chair. You want people to admire it. I think doing something well is a form of respect for humanity in general. I have found that all incompetence comes from not paying attention, which comes from people doing something that they don't want to do. And doing what you don't want to do means either you have no choice, or you don't think that the moments of your life are worth fighting for.

    - Hal Hartley
  • It seems to me that if you or I must choose between two courses of thoughts or action we should remember our dying and try so to live, that our death brings no pleasure on the world.

    - John Steinbeck
  • To succeed in the world, it is much more necessary to possess the penetration to discern who is a fool, than to discover who is a clever man.

    - Charles Talleyrand
  • CARTESIAN, adj. Relating to Descartes, a famous philosopher, author of the celebrated dictum, _Cogito ergo sum_ -- whereby he was pleased to suppose he demonstrated the reality of human existence. The dictum might be improved, however, thus: _Cogito cogito ergo cogito sum_ -- "I think that I think, therefore I think that I am;" as close an approach to certainty as any philosopher has yet made.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • You have not converted a man because you have silenced him.

    - John Viscount Morley
  • Our country, right or wrong. When right, to be kept right, when wrong to be put right.

    - Carl Schurz
  • Getting caught is the mother of invention.

    - Robert Byrne
  • The effort to understand the universe is one of the very few things that lifts human life a little above the level of farce, and gives it some of the grace of tragedy.

    - Steven Weinberg
  • When there's a lot of light, you don't notice the dark. When there's a lot of dark you always notice the light.

    - John Marsden
  • I believe in God, Mozart, and Beethoven.

    - Richard Wagner
  • Life can't be all bad when for ten dollars you can buy all the Beethoven sonatas and listen to them for ten years.

    - William F. Buckley, Jr.
  • Wretched, ephemeral race, children of chance and tribulation, why do you force me to tell you the very thing which it would be most profitable for you not to hear? The very best thing is utterly beyond your reach: not to have been born, not to be, to be nothing. However, the second best thing for you is: to die soon.

    - Aristotle
  • If you're here for four more years or four more weeks, you're here right now. I think when you're somewhere, you ought to be there. It's not about how long you stay in a place, it's about what you do while you're there, and when you go, is that place any better for your having been there?

    - Karen Hall And Jerry Stahl
  • Dick, frankly you do not have the war plan... which makes me quite happy.

    - Donald H. Rumsfeld
  • Pray you now, forget and forgive.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Without doubt one always looks more carefully at what one believes must be seen by many than at what one does only for oneself, and often the things that have seemed to me to be true when I began to concieve them have appeared false to me when I wanted to put them on paper.

    - Rene Descartes
  • Until you can measure something and express it in numbers, you have only the begining of understanding.

    - Lord Kelvin
  • I am more afriad of an army of 100 sheep lead by a lion than an army of 100 lions lead by a sheep.

    - Tallyrand
  • To accomplish great things we must first dream, then visualize, then plan... believe... act!

    - Alfred A. Montapert
  • Religion is a man using a divining rod. Philosophy is a man using a pick and shovel.

    - Author Unknown
  • One day the factory sports coach, who was very strict, pointed at four boys, including me, and ordered us to run in a race. I protested that I was weak and not fit to run, but the coach sent me for a physical examination and the doctor said that I was perfectly well. So I had to run, and when I got started I felt I wanted to win. But I only came in second. That was the way it started.

    - Emil Zatopek
  • Telling the future by looking at the past assumes that conditions remain constant. This is like driving a car by looking in the rearview mirror.

    - Herb Brody
  • Gold for friends,Lead for foes.

    - Anastasio Somoza García
  • The visionary lies to himself, the liar only to others.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Praise youth and it will prosper.

    - Irish Proverb
  • I am in fact a Hobbit, in all but size.

    - J. R. R. Tolkien
  • I always have to dream up there against the stars. If I don't dream I will make it, I won't even get close.

    - Henry J. Kaiser
  • So far as I can remember, there is not one word in the Gospels in praise of intelligence.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • Boredom is a sign of satisfied ignorance, blunted apprehension, crass sympathies, dull understanding, feeble powers of attention, and irreclaimable weakness of character.

    - James Bridie
  • To know what you prefer instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive.

    - Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Mishaps are like knives, that either serve us or cut us, as we grasp them by the blade or the handle.

    - James Russell Lowell
  • It is the way we react to circumstances that determines our feelings.

    - Dale Carnegie
  • Every time you don't follow your inner guidance, you feel a loss of energy, loss of power, a sense of spiritual deadness.

    - Shakti Gawain
  • The worst is notSo long as we can say, "This is the worst."

    - William Shakespeare
  • Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of intelligent effort.

    - John Ruskin
  • The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • Just turn left at Greenland...

    - John Lennon
  • Whatever God's dream about man may be, it seems certain it cannot come true unless man cooperates.

    - Stella Terrill Mann
  • What a mistake to suppose that the passions are strongest in youth! The passions are not stronger, but the control over them is weaker! They are more easily excited, they are more violent and apparent; but they have less energy, less durability, less intense and concentrated power than in the maturer life.

    - Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • Play is an essential function of the passage from immaturity to emotional maturity. Any individual without the opportunities for adequate play in early life will go on seeking them in the stuff of adult life.

    - Margaret Lowenfeld
  • Early morning hath gold in its mouth.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • We ought not to look back unless it is to derive useful lessons from past errors, and for the purpose of profiting by dear-brought experience.

    - George Washington
  • The more I study religions the more I am convinced that man never worshipped anything but himself.

    - Sir Richard Francis Burton
  • Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Maybe it would be better to acknowledge, like the Greeks, that a lot of behavior we call addiction is really a love of pleasure that carries the force of habit. We become addicted mostly because of the central issue in all self-control problems, which is the disproportionate value we place on short-term rewards.

    - Daniel Akst
  • The world is full of fools; and he who would not wish to see one, must not only shut himself up alone, but must also break his looking-glass.

    - Boileau
  • Question with boldness even the existence of God; because, if there is one, he must more approve of the homage of reason than that of blindfolded faith.

    - Thomas Jefferson
  • Exercise alone provides psychological and physical benefits. However, if you also adopt a strategy that engages your mind while you exercise, you can get a whole host of psychological benefits fairly quickly.

    - James Rippe
  • I would fain die a dry death.

    - William Shakespeare
  • I already knew to eat clean and listen to my body, to only eat when I was in a calm mental state. Everyone knew. But when you're fat in the head, it's never about knowing the answers. It's about living them.

    - Stephanie Klein
  • Splitting the atom is like trying to shoot a gnat in the Albert Hall at night and using ten million rounds of ammunition on the off chance of getting it. That should convince you that the atom will always be a sink of energy and never a reservoir of energy.

    - Ernest Rutherford
  • The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved.

    - Victor Hugo
  • Success means doing the best we can with what we have. Success is the doing, not the getting; in the trying, not the triumph. Success is a personal standard, reaching for the highest that is in us, becoming all that we can be. If we do our best, we are a success. Success is the maximumutilization of the ability that you have.

    - Zig Ziglar
  • It's being here now that's important. There's no past and there's no future. Time is a very misleading thing. All there is ever, is the now. We can gain experience from the past, but we can't relive it; and we can hope for the future, but we don't know if there is one.

    - George Harrison
  • The ultimate test of a relationship is to disagree but hold hands.

    - Alexander Penney
  • It has been observed that a pure democracy if it were practicable would be the most perfect government. Experience has proved that no position is more false than this. The ancient democracies in which the people themselves deliberated never possessed one good feature of government. Their very character was tyranny; their figure deformity.

    - Alexander Hamilton
  • It is not enough to limit your love to your own nation, to your own group. You must respond with love even to those outside of it. . . . This concept enables people to live together not as nations, but as the human race.

    - Clarence Jordan
  • It's the place where my prediction from the sixties finally came true: "In the future everyone will be famous for fifteen minutes." I'm bored with that line. I never use it anymore. My new line is, "In fifteen minutes everybody will be famous."

    - Andy Warhol
  • You do not need to be loved, not at the cost of yourself. The single relationship that is truly central and crucial in a life is the relationship to the self. Of all the people you will know in a lifetime, you are the only one you will never lose.

    - Jo Coudert
  • Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans.

    - President John F. Kennedy
  • Some things are so completely ludicrous that a man must laugh or die. To die laughing must be the most glorious of all glorious deaths!

    - Edgar Allan Poe
  • Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity!

    - Bible
  • Folly is often more cruel in the consequences than malice can be in the intent.

    - Aldous Huxley
  • It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.

    - Hunter S. Thompson
  • That is the American story. People, just like you, following their passions, determined to meet the times on their own terms. They weren't doing it for the money. Their titles weren't fancy. But they changed the course of history and so can you.

    - Barack Obama
  • Your parents, they give you your life, but then they try to give you their life.

    - Chuck Palahniuk
  • My eyes are an ocean in which my dreams are reflected.

    - Anna M. Uhlich
  • The pleasures of the world are deceitful; they promise more than they give. They trouble us in seeking them, they do not satisfy us when possessing them and they make us despair in losing them.

    - Madame De Lambert
  • It's not your painting anymore. It stopped being your painting the moment that you finished it.

    - Jeff Melvoin
  • The primary purpose of education is not to teach you to earn your bread, but to make every mouthful sweeter.

    - James R. Angell
  • The noun of self becomes a verb. This flashpoint of creation in the present moment is where work and play merge.

    - Stephen Nachmanovitch
  • There is no being of any race who, if he finds the proper guide, cannot attain to virtue.

    - Cicero
  • The Way is harshness greeted with kindness, fear greeted with fortitude.

    - Sidd'hartha Gautama
  • Dictionaries are like watches; the worst is better than none, and the best cannot be expected to go quite true.

    - Samuel Johnson
  • You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience by which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.

    - Eleanor Roosevelt
  • One may as well be asleep as to read for anything but to improve his mind and morals, and regulate his conduct.

    - Sterne
  • Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite variety.

    - William Shakespeare
  • The chief proof of mans greatness lies in his perception of his own smallness.

    - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  • It was, of course, a lie what you read about my religious convictions, a lie which is being systematically repeated. I do not believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have expressed it clearly. If something is in me which can be called religious then it is the unbounded admiration for the structure of the world so far as our science can reveal it.

    - Albert Einstein
  • You don't need a weather man to know which way the wind blows.

    - Bob Dylan
  • Choosing to live in narrow spaces leads to form of mental agoraphobia and that brings its own terrors. I think the willfully unimaginative see more monsters, they are often more afraid. What is more, those who choose not to empathize enable real monsters. For without ever committing an act of outright evil ourselves, we collude through our own apathy.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • I can't tell if a straw ever saved a drowning man, but I know that a mere glance is enough to make despair pause. For in truth we who are creatures of impulse are creatures of despair.

    - Joseph Conrad
  • If any one faculty of our nature may be called more wonderful than the rest, I do think it is memory. There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences. The memory is sometimes so retentive, so serviceable, so obedient; at others, so bewildered and so weak; and at others again, so tyrannic, so beyond control! We are, to be sure, a miracle every way; but our powers of recollecting and of forgetting do seem peculiarly past finding out.

    - Jane Austen
  • Whatever else can be said about sex, it cannot be called a dignified performance.

    - Helen Lawrenson
  • Property left to a child may soon be lost; but the inheritance of virtue--a good name an unblemished reputation--will abide forever. If those who are toiling for wealth to leave their children, would but take half the pains to secure for them virtuous habits, how much more serviceable would they be. The largest property may be wrested from a child, but virtue will stand by him to the last.

    - William Graham Sumner
  • Any genuine philosophy leads to action and from action back again to wonder, to enduring fact of mystery.

    - Henry Miller
  • It has just been twenty-three years since I began to wander. In the next twenty-three years I wonder if there will come a time when life is no longer a wonderful adventure; when there is not some interesting experience in things or personalities waiting just around the corner. If that time does come, I hope that my release will be swift.

    - Roy Chapman Andrews
  • Only the brave know how to forgive; it is the most refined and generous pitch of virtue human nature can arrive at.

    - Sterne
  • In the career of glory one gains many things; the gout and medals, a pension and rheumatism....And also frozen feet, an arm or leg the less, a bullet lodged between two bones which the surgeon cannot extract....all of these fatigues experienced in your youth, you pay for when you grow old. Because one has suffered in years gone by, it is necessary to suffer more, which does not seem exactly fair.

    - Elzear Blaze
  • There are people who strictly deprive themselves of each and every eatable, drinkable, and smokable which has in any way acquired a shady reputation. They pay this price for health. And health is all they get for it. How strange it is. It is like paying out your whole fortune for a cow that has gone dry.

    - Mark Twain
  • I've never struck a woman in my life, not even my own mother.

    - W. C. Fields
  • Not everything made you stronger. It was possible to survive, yet still be crippled for your trouble. Sometimes it was okay to run away, to skip the test, to chicken out. Or at least to get some help.

    - Scott Westerfeld
  • A man, to be greatly good, must magine intensely and comprehensively; he must put himself in the place of another and in many others; the pains and pleasures of his species must become his own.

    - Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Childhood has no forebodings, but then, it is soothed by no memories of outlived sorrow.

    - George Eliot
  • The important work of moving the world forward does not wait to be done by perfect men.

    - George Eliot
  • When a man takes one step toward God, God takes more steps toward that man than there are sands in the worlds of time.

    - The Work Of The Chariot
  • Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.

    - Thomas A. Edison
  • The best inheritance a parent can give his children is a few minutes of his time each day.

    - O. A. Battista
  • Forgiveness does not always lead to a healed relationship. Some people are not capable of love, and it might be wise to let them go along with your anger. Wish them well, and let them go their way.

    - Real Live Preacher
  • Society, my dear, is like salt water, good to swim in but hard to swallow.

    - Arthur Stringer
  • Cursed be he that moves my bones.

    - William Shakespeare
  • We will discover the nature of our particular genius when we stop trying to conform to our own or to other peoples' models, learn to be ourselves, and allow our natural channel to open.

    - Shakti Gawain
  • Fortune can, for her pleasure, fools advance,And toss them on the wheels of Chance.

    - Juvenal
  • Don't accept rides from strange men, and remember that all men are strange.

    - Robin Morgan
  • I believe in getting into hot water; it keeps you clean.

    - G. K. Chesterton
  • To sin in silence while others doth protest makes cowards out of men.

    - Ella Wheeler Wilcox
  • Come unto these yellow sands,And then take hands:Courtsied when you have, and kiss'dThe wild waves whist.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Apothegms are portable wisdom, the quintessential extracts of thought and feelings.

    - R. W. Alger
  • Men have conceived a twofold use of sleep; it is a refreshing of the body in this life, and a preparing of the soul for the next.

    - John Donne
  • We are like sculptors, constantly carving out of others the image we long for, need, love or desire, often against reality, against their benefit, and always, in the end, a disappointment, because it does not fit them.

    - Anais Nin
  • And dreams in their development have breath,And tears, and tortures, and the touch of joy;They leave a weight upon our waking thoughts,They take a weight from off our waking toils,They do divide our being.

    - Lord Byron
  • The solution is to gradually become free of societal rewards and learn how to substitute for them rewards that are under one's own powers. This is not to say that we should abandon every goal endorsed by society; rather, it means that, in addition to or instead of the goals others use to bribe us with, we develop a set of our own.

    - Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
  • The wages of sin are unreported.

    - Unknown
  • We are not in a position in which we have nothing to work with. We already have capacities, talents, direction, missions, callings.

    - Abraham Harold Maslow
  • When we abolish the slavery of half of humanity, together with the whole system of hypocrisy it implies, then the "division" of humanity will reveal its genuine significance and the human couple will find its true form.

    - Simone De Beauvoir
  • Many people think that if they were only in some other place, or had some other job, they would be happy. Well, that is doubtful. So get as much happiness out of what you are doing as you can and don't put off being happy until some future date.

    - Dale Carnegie
  • The trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit.

    - Moliere
  • Computers make it easier to do a lot of things, but most of the things they make it easier to do don't need to be done.

    - Andy Rooney
  • Merrily, merrily shall I live now,Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Rest assured that there is nothing which wounds the heart of a noble man more deeply than the thought his honour is assailed.

    - Moliere
  • The art of medicine consists in amusing the patient while nature cures the disease.

    - Voltaire
  • Alleluia! We do not have to be right! We do have to love, to be vulnerable, to accept joy and pain, and to grow through them.

    - Madeleine L'Engle
  • Advertising is the modern substitute for argument; its function is to make the worse appear the better.

    - George Santayana
  • Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts. This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell.

    - William Strunk Jr.
  • Doctors pour drugs of which they know little, to cure diseases of which they know less, into patients of whom they know nothing.

    - Moliere
  • A neurosis is a secret that you don't know you are keeping.

    - Kenneth Tynan
  • The trouble with normal is it always gets worse.

    - Bruce Cockburn
  • No one is safe from slander. The best way is to pay no attention to it, but live in innocence and let the world talk.

    - Moliere
  • Laughter, while it lasts, slackens and unbraces the mind, weakens the faculties and causes a kind of remissness and dissolution in all the powers of the soul; and thus it may be looked on as weakness in the composition of human nature. But if we consider the frequent reliefs we receive from it and how often it breaks the gloom which is apt to depress the mind and damp our spirits, with transient, unexpected gleams of joy, one would take care not to grow too wise for so great a pleasure of life.

    - Joseph Addison
  • We clearly realize that freedom's inner kingdom cannot be touched by exterior attacks.

    - Vernon Howard
  • I confess I do not know why, but looking at the stars always makes me dream.

    - Vincent Van Gogh
  • The IQ and the life expectancy of the average American recently passed each other going in opposite directions.

    - George Carlin
  • Let not the sands of time get in your lunch.

    - National Lampoon
  • Please choose the way of peace. ... In the short term there may be winners and losers in this war that we all dread. But that never can, nor never will justify the suffering, pain and loss of life your weapons will cause.

    - Mother Teresa
  • From the beginning of our history the country has been afflicted with compromise. It is by compromise that human rights have been abandoned. I insist that this shall cease. The country needs repose after all its trials; it deserves repose. And repose can only be found in everlasting principles.

    - Charles Sumner
  • Love, I find, is like singing. Everybody can do it enough to impress themselves, though it may not impress the neighbors as being very much.

    - Zora Neale Hurston
  • Most joyful the Poet be;It is through him that all men see.

    - William Ellery Channing
  • I don't care what your liberal agenda is, you'll never accomplish anything if the people don't trust us with their money, and they don't trust us Democrats.

    - Howard Dean
  • The people can always be brought to the bidding of their leaders. All you have to do is tell them that they are in danger of being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger.

    - Hermann Göring
  • You have succeeded in life when all you really want is only what you really need.

    - Vernon Howard
  • An injustice anywhere is an injustice everywhere.

    - Samuel Johnson
  • I loathe people who keep dogs. They are cowards who haven't got the guts to bite people themselves.

    - August Strindberg
  • I stopped believing in Santa Claus when my mother took me to see him in a department store, and he asked for my autograph.

    - Shirley Temple Black
  • You can lead a whore to culture, but you can't make her think.

    - Dorothy Parker
  • The quality will remain when the price is forgotten.

    - Henry Royce
  • Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again.

    - Andre Gide
  • Shortchange your education now and you may be short of change the rest of your life.

    - Author Unknown
  • I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours.

    - Jerome K Jerome
  • There is a luxury in self-reproach. When we blame ourselves, we feel that no one else has a right to blame us. It is the confession, not the priest, that gives us absolution.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • The best index to a person's character is(a) how he treats people who can't do him any good, and(b) how he treats people who can't fight back.

    - Abigail Van Buren
  • Like President Reagan, President Bush has not shied from calling evil by its name or declaring his intention to defeat its latest incarnation, terrorism, just as free men and women of all political persuasions, here and abroad, defeated fascism and communism before.

    - Donald H. Rumsfeld
  • Freedom also includes the right to mismanage your own affairs.

    - Author Unknown
  • I've never gotten over what they call stagefright. I go through it every show. I'm pretty concerned, I'm pretty much thinking about the show. I never get completely comfortable with it, and I don't let the people around me get comfortable with it, in that I remind them that it's a new crowd out there, it's a new audience, and they haven't seen us before. So it's got to be like the first time we go on.

    - Elvis Presley
  • Yes, we have to divide up our time like that, between our politics and our equations. But to me our equations are far more important, for politics are only a matter of present concern. A mathematical equation stands forever.

    - Albert Einstein
  • There are two classes of poets - the poets by education and practice, these we respect; and poets by nature, these we love.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Few men are willing to brave the disapproval of their fellows, the censure of their colleagues, the wrath of their society. Moral courage is a rarer commodity than bravery in battle or great intelligence. Yet it is the one essential, vital quality for those who seek to change a world which yields most painfully to change.

    - Robert F. Kennedy
  • Any great work of art . . . revives and readapts time and space, and the measure of its success is the extent to which it makes you an inhabitant of that world -- the extent to which it invites you in and lets you breathe its strange, special air.

    - Leonard Bernstein
  • While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die.

    - Leonardo Da Vinci
  • Peace at home is peace in the country. Peace in the country is peace in the world.

    - Mustafa Kemal Ataturk
  • You go to war with the Army you have. They’re not the Army you might want or wish to have at a later time.

    - Donald H. Rumsfeld
  • Ignorance, the root and the stem of every evil.

    - Plato
  • Worry a little bit every day and in a lifetime you will lose a couple of years. If something is wrong, fix it if you can. But train yourself not to worry. Worry never fixes anything.

    - Mary Hemingway
  • If a child lives with approval, he learns to live with himself.

    - Dorothy Law Nolte
  • Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is in an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob, and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.

    - Frederick Douglass
  • Resistance is useless.

    - Doctor Who
  • The leadership instinct you are born with is the backbone. You develop the funny bone and the wishbone that go with it.

    - Elaine Agather
  • Live truth instead of professing it.

    - Elbert Hubbard
  • He who learns but does not think, is lost! He who thinks but does not learn is in great danger.

    - Confucius
  • How hard it is, sometimes, to trust the evidence of one's senses! How reluctantly the mind consents to reality.

    - Norman Douglas
  • The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail.

    - William Faulkner
  • All the world's a cage.

    - Jeanne Phillips
  • A subject for a great poet would be God's boredom after the seventh day of creation.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The point of public relations slogans like "Support our troops" is that they don't mean anything... That's the whole point of good propaganda. You want to create a slogan that nobody's going to be against, and everybody's going to be for. Nobody knows what it means, because it doesn't mean anything. Its crucial value is that it diverts your attention from a question that does mean something: Do you support our policy? That's the one you're not allowed to talk about.

    - Noam Chomsky
  • You're alive. Do something. The directive in life, the moral imperative was so uncomplicated. It could be expressed in single words, not complete sentences. It sounded like this: Look. Listen. Choose. Act.

    - Barbara Hall
  • Reality is something you rise above.

    - Liza Minnelli
  • The best way to get approval is not to need it.

    - Hugh Macleod
  • People in high life are hardened to the wants and distresses of mankind as surgeons are to their bodily pains.

    - G. K. Chesterton
  • I want to believe in intelligent design, and hence I am suspicious of anything that seems to confirm my desire to believe.

    - James Lileks
  • The peril of every fine faculty is the delight of playing with it for pride. Talent is commonly developed at the expense of character, and the greater it grows, the more is the mischief. Talent is mistaken for genius, a dogma or system for truth, ambition for greatest, ingenuity for poetry, sensuality for art.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • He was a genius - that is to say, a man who does superlatively and without obvious effort something that most people cannot do by the uttermost exertion of their abilities.

    - Robertson Davies
  • A thorn defends the rose, harming only those who would steal the blossom.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly American criminal class except Congress.

    - Mark Twain
  • It is quite possible for people who have never met us and who have spent only twenty minutes thinking about us to come to a better understanding of who we are than people who have known us for years.

    - Malcolm Gladwell
  • There are many methods for predicting the future. For example, you can read horoscopes, tea leaves, tarot cards, or crystal balls. Collectively, these methods are known as "nutty methods." Or you can put well-researched facts into sophisticated computer models, more commonly referred to as "a complete waste of time."

    - Scott Adams
  • Neither great poverty nor great riches will hear reason.

    - Henry Fielding
  • A word to the wise is enough.

    - Titus Maccius Plautus
  • No great genius has ever existed without some touch of madness.

    - Aristotle
  • Well may we say God save the Queen, because nothing will save the Governor-General.

    - Gough Whitlam
  • I am not an American who "will cut the cloth of my conscience to fit this year's fashions."

    - Lillian Hellman
  • Character is doing the right thing when nobody's looking. There are too many people who think that the only thing that's right is to get by, and the only thing that's wrong is to get caught.

    - J. C. Watts
  • How is it possible to find meaning in a finite world, given my waist and shirt size?

    - Woody Allen
  • If happiness could be brought, few of us could pay the price.

    - Author Unknown
  • Quality is never an accident.

    - William A. Foster
  • Shallow understanding accompanies poor compassion, great understanding goes with great compassion.

    - Thich Nhat Hanh
  • I never feel that I have comprehended an emotion, or fully lived even the smallest events, until I have reflected upon it in my journal; my pen is my truest confidant, holding in check the passions and disappointments that I dare not share even with my beloved.

    - Stephanie Barron
  • If one speaks or acts with a cruel mind, misery follows, as the cart follows the horse... If one speaks or acts with a pure mind, happiness follows, as a shadow follows its source.

    - The Dhammapada
  • Half of the modern drugs could well be thrown out of the window, except that the birds might eat them.

    - Dr. Martin Henry Fischer
  • With foxes we must play the fox.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • All things are difficult before they are easy.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • To the person in the bell jar, blank and stopped as a dead baby, the world itself is a bad dream.

    - Sylvia Plath
  • Have you ever observed that we pay much more attention to a wise passage when it is quoted than when we read it in the original author?

    - Philip G. Hamerton
  • Money is the sinew of love as well as war.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • There is no gravity. The earth sucks.

    - Graffito
  • Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned,Nor hell a fury like a woman scorned.

    - William Congreve
  • The slave has but one master, the ambitious man has as many as can help in making his fortune.

    - Jean De La Bruyere
  • It is as natural to die as to be born; and to a little infant perhaps the one is as painful as the other.

    - Sir Francis Bacon
  • A good life is a series of joyful meetings and joyful moments.

    - Sir Francis Bacon
  • Knowledge is the eye of desire and can become the pilot of the soul.

    - Will Durant
  • Humor can be dissected as a frog can, but the thing dies in the process and the innards are discouraging to any but the pure scientific mind.

    - E. B. White
  • Never take the advice of someone who has not had your kind of trouble.

    - Sydney J. Harris
  • Our repeated failure to fully act as we would wish must not discourage us. It is the sincere intention that is the essential thing, and this will in time release us from the bondage of habits which at present seem almost insuperable.

    - Thomas Troward
  • The slanderer and the assassin differ only in the weapon they use; with the one it is the dagger, with the other the tongue. The former is worse that the latter, for the last only kills the body, while the other murders the reputation.

    - Tryon Edwards
  • All sects are different, because they come from men; morality is everywhere the same, because it comes from God.

    - Voltaire
  • Since when was genius found respectable?

    - Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  • There be three things which make a nation great and prosperous: a fertile soil, busy workshops, easy conveyance for men and goods from place to place.

    - Sir Francis Bacon
  • Man will occasionally stumble over the truth, but usually manages to pick himself up, walk over or around it, and carry on.

    - Winston Spencer Churchill
  • There is a growing suspicion that what the world needs now is a religion that will cover the other six days of the week.

    - Author Unknown
  • First it is necessary to stand on your own two feet. But the minute a man finds himself in that position, the next thing he should do is reach out his arms.

    - Kristin Hunter
  • Instant gratification takes too long.

    - Carrie Fisher
  • We struggle with the complexities and avoid the simplicities.

    - Norman Vincent Peale
  • Blues is easy to play, but hard to feel.

    - Jimi Hendrix
  • Ah, what shall I be at fifty,should nature keep me alive,if I find the world so bitterwhen I am but twenty-five?

    - Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  • One has a greater sense of intellectual degradation after an interview with a doctor than from any human experience.

    - Alice James
  • If one asks for success and prepares for failure, he will get the situation he has prepared for.

    - Florence Scovel Shinn
  • That is not dead which can eternal lieAnd with strange aeons even death may die.

    - H. P. Lovecraft
  • When I have a kid, I wanna put him in one of those strollers for twins, then run around the mall looking frantic.

    - Steven Wright
  • To know oneself is to study oneself in action with another person.

    - Bruce Lee
  • So we and our elaborately evolving computers may meet each other halfway. Someday a human being, named perhaps Fred White, may shoot a robot named Pete Something-or-other, which has come out of a General Electric factory, and to his surprise see it weep and bleed. And the dying robot may shoot back and, to its surprise, see a wisp of gray smoke arise from the electric pump that it supposed was Mr. White's beating heart. It would be rather a great moment of truth for both of them.

    - Philip K. Dick
  • It's not what we eat but what we digest that makes us strong; not what we gain but what we save that makes us rich; not what we read but remember that makes us learned; and not what we profess but what we practice that gives us integrity.

    - Sir Francis Bacon
  • Everyone should free their mind and soul. Some are ready to free them now, and some will be ready to free them in the future. Some will never be ready and that is what makes their lives not worth living.

    - Emad Hasan
  • Strong reasons make strong actions.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Being defeated is often a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it permanent.

    - Marilyn Vos Savant
  • The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care.

    - Sir Philip Sidney
  • All normal people love meat. If I went to a barbeque and there was no meat, I would say 'Yo Goober! Where's the meat!?' I'm trying to impress people here, Lisa. You don't win friends with salad.

    - Matt Groening
  • The outward freedom that we shall attain will only be in exact proportion to the inward freedom to which we may have grown at a given moment. And if this is a correct view of freedom, our chief energy must be concentrated on achieving reform from within.

    - Mahatma Gandhi
  • War is cruel and you cannot refine it.

    - William Tecumseh Sherman
  • Brass bands are all very well in their place - outdoors and several miles away.

    - Sir Thomas Beecham
  • Flowers are the sweetest things God ever made and forgot to put a soul into.

    - Henry Ward Beecher
  • Maps encourage boldness. They're like cryptic love letters. They make anything seem possible.

    - Mark Jenkins
  • Poetry cannot be translated; and, therefore, it is the poets that preserve the languages; for we would not be at the trouble to learn a language if we could have all that is written in it just as well in a translation. But as the beauties of poetry cannot be preserved in any language except that in which it was originally written, we learn the language.

    - John Wilson
  • When you strike at a king, you must kill him.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Would you want to do business with a person who was 99% honest?

    - Sidney Madwed
  • For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?

    - Bible
  • An expert is a person who avoids small error as he sweeps on to the grand fallacy.

    - Benjamin Stolberg
  • There is a great deal of difference between an eager man who wants to read a book and the tired man who wants a book to read.

    - G. K. Chesterton
  • There's a thin line between Saturday night and Sunday morning.

    - Jimmy Buffett
  • It is certain that either wise bearing or ignorant carriage is caught, as men take diseases, one from another; therefore, let all take heed as to the society in which they mingle, for in a little while they will be like it.

    - Rule Of Life
  • When we cannot hope to win, it is an advantage to yield.

    - Quintilian
  • Nature herself has never attempted to effect great changes rapidly.

    - Quintilian
  • Jenny replied to this with a bitterness which might have surprized a judicious person, who had observed the tranquillity with which she bore all the affronts to her chastity; but her patience was perhaps tired out, for this is a virtue which is very apt to be fatigued by exercise.

    - Henry Fielding
  • With hope or without hope we will follow the trail of our enemies. And woe to them, if we prove the swifter!

    - J. R. R. Tolkien
  • Never offend people with style when you can offend them with substance.

    - Sam Brown
  • Difficulties are meant to rouse, not discourage. The human spirit is to grow strong by conflict.

    - William Ellery Channing
  • The West won the world not by the superiority of its ideas or values or religion but rather by its superiority in applying organized violence. Westerners often forget this fact, non-Westerners never do.

    - Samuel P. Huntington
  • Any great truth can -- and eventually will -- be expressed as a cliche -- a cliche is a sure and certain way to dilute an idea. For instance, my grandmother used to say, 'The black cat is always the last one off the fence.' I have no idea what she meant, but at one time, it was undoubtedly true.

    - Solomon Short
  • My theology, briefly, is that the universe was dictated but not signed.

    - Christopher Morley
  • I never did a day's work in my life. It was all fun.

    - Thomas A. Edison
  • My work is a game, a very serious game.

    - M. C. Escher
  • Education is a progressive discovery of our own ignorance.

    - Will Durant
  • The great majority of us are required to live a life of constant, systematic duplicity. Your health is bound to be affected if, day after day, you say the opposite of what you feel, if you grovel before what you dislike and rejoice at what bring you nothing but misfortune. Our nervous system isn't just a fiction, it's part of our physical body, and our soul exists in space and is inside us, like teeth in our mouth. It can't be forever violated with impunity.

    - Boris Pasternak
  • If the Phone Doesn't Ring, It's Me

    - Jimmy Buffett
  • The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.

    - William James
  • We must come to see that peace is not merely a distant goal we seek, but it is a means by which we arrive at that goal. We must pursue peaceful ends through peaceful means.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • If my theory of relativity proves to be correct, Germany will claim me a German, and France will claim me a citizen of the world. However, if it proves wrong, France will say I’m a German, and Germany will say that I’m a jew.

    - Albert Einstein
  • A wise man's day is worth a fool's life.

    - Arabic
  • Shopping is better than sex. If you're not satisfied after shopping you can make an exchange for something you really like.

    - Adrienne E. Gusoff
  • He who multiplies riches multiplies cares.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • Experience teaches only the teachable.

    - Aldous Huxley
  • Be on the alert to recognize your prime at whatever time of your life it may occur.

    - Muriel Spark
  • There will always be a part, and always a very large part of every community, that have no care but for themselves, and whose care for themselves reaches little further than impatience of immediate pain, and eagerness for the nearest good.

    - Samuel Johnson
  • Here is the test to find whether your mission on earth is finished. If you're alive, it isn't.

    - Richard Bach
  • Health food makes me sick.

    - Calvin Trillin
  • If you want to build a ship, don't drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea.

    - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  • There are no wise few. Every aristocracy that has ever existed has behaved, in all essential points, exactly like a small mob.

    - G. K. Chesterton
  • Yesterday is not ours to recover, but tomorrow is ours to win or to lose.

    - Lyndon B. Johnson
  • To think is to act.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything.

    - Joseph Stalin
  • Do not be wise in words - be wise in deeds.

    - Jewish Proverb
  • Skiing consists of wearing $3,000 worth of clothes and equipment and driving 200 miles in the snow in order to stand around at a bar and drink.

    - P. J. O'Rourke
  • You're never as good as everyone tells you when you win, and you're never as bad as they say when you lose.

    - Lou Holtz
  • Friendship improves hapiness and reduces misery, by doubting our joys and dividing our grief.

    - Joseph Addison
  • Be master of your petty annoyances and conserve your energies for the big, worthwhile things. It isn't the mountain ahead that wears you out - it's the grain of sand in your shoe.

    - Robert W. Service
  • Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job.

    - Douglas Adams
  • A man cannot be comfortable without his own approval.

    - Mark Twain
  • My country owes me nothing. It gave me, as it gives every boy and girl, a chance. It gave me schooling, independence of action, opportunity for service and honor. In no other land could a boy from a country village, without inheritance or influential friends, look forward with unbounded hope.

    - Herbert Hoover
  • STRATEGY is; A style of thinking, a conscious and deliberate process, an intensive implementation system, the science of insuring FUTURE SUCCESS.

    - Pete Johnson
  • Both the cockroach and the bird would get along very well without us, although the cockroach would miss us most.

    - Joseph Wood Krutch
  • The history of the human race, viewed as a whole may be regarded as the realization of a hidden plan of nature to bring about a political constitution, internally, and for this purpose, also externally perfect, as the only state in which all the capacities implanted by her in mankind can be fully developed.

    - Immanuel Kant
  • Criminals do not die by the hands of the law. They die by the hands of other men.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • Taste is not only a part and index of morality, it is the only morality. The first, and last, and closest trial question to any living creature is "What do you like?" Tell me what you like, I'll tell you what you are.

    - John Ruskin
  • Man is only miserable so far as he thinks himself so.

    - Jacopo Sannazaro
  • We two are to ourselves a crowd.

    - Ovid
  • Nobody in the game of football should be called a genius. A genius is somebody like Norman Einstein.

    - Joe Theismann
  • The reason most people never reach their goals is that they don't define them, or ever seriously consider them as believable or achievable. Winners can tell you where they are going, what they plan to do along the way, and who will be sharing the adventure with them.

    - Denis Waitley
  • Too many have dispensed with generosity in order to practice charity.

    - Albert Camus
  • The capacity of human beings to bore one another seems to be vastly greater than that of any other animal.

    - H. L. Mencken
  • EXHORT, v.t. In religious affairs, to put the conscience of another upon the spit and roast it to a nut-brown discomfort.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • You are beautiful, but you are empty. One could not die for you. To be sure, an ordinary passerby would think that my rose looked just like you--the rose that belongs to me. But in herself alone she is more important than all the hundreds of you other roses: because it is she that I have watered.

    - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  • How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?

    - William Shakespeare
  • Success, in a generally accepted sense of the term, means the opportunity to experience and to realize to the maximum the forces that are within us.

    - David Sarnoff
  • The main source of our wealth is goodness. The affections and the generous qualities that God admires in a world full of greed.

    - Alfred A. Montapert
  • The art of conversation consist as much in listening politely, as in talking agreeably.

    - Atwell
  • He who has not a good memory should never take upon himself the trade of lying.

    - Michel De Montaigne
  • He that cannot decidedly say, "No," when tempted to evil, is on the highway to ruin. He loses the respect even of those who would tempt him, and becomes but the pliant tool and victim of their evil designs.

    - J. Hawes
  • Sin has many tools, but a lie is the handle that fits them all.

    - Oliver Wendell Holmes
  • Every person, all the events of your life, are there because you have drawn them there. What you choose to do with them is up to you.

    - Richard Bach
  • Documentation is like sex: when it is good, it is very, very good; and when it is bad, it is better than nothing.

    - Dick Brandon
  • War is like love; it always finds a way.

    - Bertolt Brecht
  • There is a difference between happiness and wisdom: he that thinks himself the happiest man is really so; but he that thinks himself the wisest is generally the greatest fool.

    - Sir Francis Bacon
  • Conceit is God's gift to little men.

    - Bruce Barton
  • Everything that is really great and inspiring is created by the individual who can labor in freedom.

    - Albert Einstein
  • There's no fool like an old fool --- you can't beat experience.

    - Jacob Braude
  • If thou desire the love of God and man, be humble, for the proud heart, as it loves none but itself, is beloved of none but itself. Humility enforces where neither virtue, nor strength, nor reason can prevail.

    - Francis Quarles
  • Feeding the starving poor only increases their number.

    - Ben Bova
  • The ability to focus attention on important things is a defining characteristic of intelligence.

    - Robert J. Shiller
  • She was conscious that the things she did were the things she had always wanted to do.

    - Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald
  • A cynic is not merely one who reads bitter lessons from the past, he is one who is prematurely disappointed in the future.

    - Sydney J. Harris
  • The happiest is the person who suffers the least pain; the most miserable who enjoys the least pleasure.

    - Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Many a man has finally succeeded only because he has failed after repeated efforts. If he had never met defeat he would never have known any great victory.

    - Orison Swett Marden
  • Pick battles big enough to matter, small enough to win.

    - Jonathan Kozol
  • Why have many saints been so perfectly contemplative? Because they always studied to mortify themselves from worldly desires, that they might freely, with all the power of their heart, tend to our Lord.

    - Thomas A Kempis
  • When we can say "no" not only to things that are wrong and sinful, but also to things pleasant, profitable, and good which would hinder and clog our grand duties and our chief work, we shall understand more fully what life is worth, and how to make the most of it.

    - Charles A. Stoddard
  • It is a mistake to suppose that men succeed through success; they much oftener succeed through failures. Precept, study, advice, and example could never have taught them so well as failure has done.

    - Samuel Smiles
  • Not the senses I have but what I do with them is my kingdom.

    - Helen Keller
  • He who is slowest in making a promise is most faithful in its performance.

    - Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Lies are usually caused by undue fear of men.

    - Hasidic Saying
  • I think there is a choice possible to us at any moment, as long as we live. But there is no sacrifice. There is a choice, and the rest falls away. Second choice does not exist. Beware of those who talk about sacrifice.

    - Muriel Rukeyser
  • Everyone who achieves success in a great venture, solved each problem as they came to it. They helped themselves. And they were helped through powers known and unknown to them at the time they set out on their voyage. They kept going regardless of the obstacles they met.

    - W. Clement Stone
  • A great leader never sets himself above his followers except in carrying responsibilities.

    - Jules Ormont
  • Look at all the sentences which seem true and question them.

    - David Riesman
  • FLOP, v. Suddenly to change one's opinions and go over to another party. The most notable flop on record was that of Saul of Tarsus, who has been severely criticised as a turn-coat by some of our partisan journals.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Kites rise highest against the wind - not with it.

    - Winston Spencer Churchill
  • When we are born, we cry, that we are comeTo this great stage of fools.

    - William Shakespeare
  • There is nothing good or bad, but thinking makes it so.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Common sense is the knack of seeing things as they are and doing things as they ought to be done.

    - Josh Billings
  • It may be that our role on this planet is not to worship God-but to create him.

    - Arthur C. Clarke
  • When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.

    - Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • Everyone has his day and some days last longer than others.

    - Winston Spencer Churchill
  • Oscar Wilde said, 'The only way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it.' He’s got it wrong. The unrestrained appeasement of desire only expands hungers. Does not our experience tell us so?

    - Ravi Zacharias
  • Every success is built on the ability to do better than good enough.

    - Author Unknown
  • Weak people cannot be sincere.

    - Francois De La Rochefoucauld
  • Those that think it permissible to tell white lies soon grow color blind.

    - Austin O'Malley
  • What other dungeon is so dark as one's own heart! What jailer so inexorable as one's self!

    - Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Take away the right to say "fuck" and you take away the right to say "fuck the government."

    - Lenny Bruce
  • A nation or civilization that continues to produce soft-minded men purchases its own spiritual death on an installment plan.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • For man, as for flower and beast and bird, the supreme triumph is to be most vividly, most perfectly alive.

    - David H. Lawrence
  • We have flown the air like birds and swum the seas like fishes, but have yet to learn the simple act of walking the earth like brothers.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • It is better to wear out than to rust out.

    - Bishop Richard Cumberland
  • You will make all kinds of mistakes but as long as you are generous and true and fierce you cannot hurt the world, or even seriously distress her.

    - Winston Spencer Churchill
  • A handful of common sense is worth a bushel of learning.

    - Author Unknown
  • Nine out of ten people who change their minds are wrong the second time too.

    - Author Unknown
  • Necessity has no law.

    - William Langland
  • Be modest! It is the kind of pride least likely to offend.

    - Jules Renard
  • If a man is called to be a streetsweeper, he should sweep streets even as Michelangelo painted or Beethoven composed music or Shakespeare wrote poetry. He should sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will pause and say, "Here lived a great streetsweeper who did his job well."

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • All technology should be assumed guilty until proven innocent.

    - David Brower
  • He that thinks himself the wisest is generally the least so.

    - C. C. Colton
  • One who condones evils is just as guilty as the one who perpetrates it.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • He conquered with his weapons, but was conquered by his vices.

    - Lucius Annaeus Seneca
  • We shape our buildings and they shape us.

    - Winston Spencer Churchill
  • Cowardice asks the question - is it safe?Expediency asks the question - is it politic?Vanity asks the question - is it popular?But conscience asks the question - is it right?And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular; but one must take it because it is right.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • The soul would have no rainbow had the eyes no tears.

    - John Vance Cheney
  • Clever liars give details, but the cleverest don't.

    - Author Unknown
  • Falsehood has an infinity of combinations, but truth has only one mode of being.

    - Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • I’ve seen too much hate to want to hate, myself, and every time I see it, I say to myself, hate is too great a burden to bear. Somehow we must be able to stand up against our most bitter opponents and say:”We shall match your capacity to inflict suffering by our capacity to endure suffering. We will meet your physical force with soul force. Do to us what you will and we will still love you.... But be assured that we’ll wear you down by our capacity to suffer, and one day we will win our freedom. We will not only win freedom for ourselves; we will appeal to your heart and conscience that we will win you in the process, and our victory will be a double victory.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • The biggest shortage of all is the shortage of common sense.

    - Author Unknown
  • Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars... Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • If you tell a lie -- tell a big one.

    - Joseph Goebbels
  • He [Somoza] may be a son of a bitch, but he's our son of a bitch.

    - Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • The truth is the kindest thing we can give folks in the end.

    - Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • I am grateful for even the sharpest criticism, as long as it sticks to the point.(Ich bin dankbar fur die schärfste Kritik, wenn sie nur sachlich bleibt.)

    - Otto Von Bismarck
  • The quality, not the longevity, of one's life is what is important.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Slight not what's near, while aiming at what's far.

    - Euripides
  • If, after all, men cannot always make history have meaning, they can always act so that their own lives have one.

    - Albert Camus
  • The reason why so few good books are written is that so few people who can write know anything.

    - Walter Bagehot
  • Dogs feel very strongly that they should always go with you in the car, in case the need should arise for them to bark violently at nothing right in your ear.

    - Dave Barry
  • FORCE, n."Force is but might," the teacher said --"That definition's just."The boy said naught but through instead,Remembering his pounded head:"Force is not might but must!"

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • For good or ill, your conversation is your advertisement. Every time you open your mouth you let men look into your mind. Do they see it well clothed, neat, busineswise?

    - Bruce Burton
  • He who cannot be a good follower cannot be a good leader.

    - Aristotle
  • Love is the only force capable of transforming an enemy into a friend.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • If life were fair, Dan Quayle would be making a living asking 'Do you want fries with that?'

    - John Cleese
  • He had the entertainment of thinking that if he had for that moment stopped the clock it was to promote the next minute this still livelier motion.

    - Henry James
  • Silence is one of the hardest arguments to refute.

    - Josh Billings
  • A bore is a man who deprives you of solitude without providing you with company.

    - Gian Vincenzo Gravina
  • Success isn't necessarily permanent - but neither is failure.

    - Author Unknown
  • A man sooner or later discovers that he is the master-gardener of his soul, the director of his life.

    - James Allen
  • The word 'meaningful' when used today is nearly always meaningless.

    - Paul Johnson
  • The secret of success is to do all you can do without thought of success.

    - Author Unknown
  • Life is a struggle, but not a warfare.

    - John Burroughs
  • Wisdom born of experience should tell us that war is obsolete. There may have been a time when war served as a negative good by preventing the spread and growth of an evil force... If we assume that life is worth living, if we assume that mankind has the right to survive, then we must find an alternative to war.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • There cannot be greater rudeness than to interrupt another in the current of his discourse.

    - John Locke
  • I am convinced that the world is not a mere bog in which men and women trample themselves in the mire and die. Something magnificent is taking place here amid the cruelties and tragedies, and the supreme challenge to intelligence is that of making the noblest and best in our curious heritage prevail.

    - Charles Austin Beard
  • Good place to put things--cellars.

    - Doctor Who
  • It is remarkable how similar the pattern of love is to the pattern of insanity.

    - Andy & Larry Wachowski
  • Exterminate.

    - The Daleks (Doctor Who)
  • Good order is the foundation of all things.

    - Edmund Burke
  • FRIENDLESS, adj. Having no favors to bestow. Destitute of fortune. Addicted to utterance of truth and common sense.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Go ahead, make my day.

    - Dean Riesner
  • It is by universal misunderstanding that all agree. For if, by ill luck, people understood each other, they would never agree.

    - Charles Baudelaire
  • We don't know what we want, but we are ready to bite somebody to get it.

    - Will Rogers
  • Work is not always required. There is such a thing as sacred idleness.

    - George Mcdonald
  • The game of life is not much in holding a good hand, as in playing a poor hand well.

    - H.T. Leslie
  • As empty vessels make the loudest sound, so they that have least with are the greatest babblers.

    - Plato
  • Absolute faith corrupts as absolutely as absolute power.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • Anyone who can handle a needle convincingly can make us see a thread which is not there.

    - E. H. Gombrich
  • He who feels no compassion will become insane.

    - Hasidic Saying
  • When an individual fear or apathy passes by the unfortunate, life is of no account.

    - Haniel Long
  • Reality is that which refuses to go away when I stop believing in it.

    - Philip K. Dick
  • Family isn't about whose blood you have. It's about who you care about.

    - Trey Parker And Matt Stone
  • You teach best what you most need to learn.

    - Richard Bach
  • Life is an escalator: You can move forward or backward; you can not remain still.

    - Patricia Russell-Mccloud
  • The most important thing in life is to learn how to give out love, and to let it come in.

    - Morrie Schwartz
  • Life has its own hidden forces which you can only discover by living.

    - Søren Kierkegaard
  • Blessed are those who can give without remembering, and take without forgetting.

    - Princess Elizabeth Asquith Bibesco
  • Never discourage anyone...who continually makes progress, no matter how slow.

    - Plato
  • The course of life is unpredictable, no one can write his autobiography in advance.

    - Rabbi Abraham Heschel
  • Gather in your resources, rally all your faculties, marshal all your energies, focus all your capacities upon mastery of at least one field of endeavor.

    - John Haggai
  • A little tact and wise management may often evade resistance, and carry a point, where direct force might be in vain.

    - Author Unknown
  • Most people get interested in stocks when everyone else is. The time to get interested is when no one else is. You can't buy what is popular and do well.

    - Warren Buffett
  • He who lives by the sword, will eventually be wiped out by some bastard with a sawn off shotgun

    - Steady Eddy
  • A truly elegant taste is generally accompanied with excellency of heart.

    - Henry Fielding
  • You will never truly know yourself or the strength of your relationships until both have been tested by adversity.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • Here's a rule I recommend: Never practice two vices at once.

    - Tallulah Bankhead
  • Concentration is my motto - first honesty, then industry, then concentration.

    - Andrew Carnegie
  • We should be taught not to wait for inspiration to start a thing. Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action.

    - Frank Tibolt
  • Anything that is of value in life only multiplies when it is given.

    - Deepak Chopra
  • Love and magic have a great deal in common. They enrich the soul, delight the heart. And they both take practice.

    - Nora Roberts
  • There was never anything by the wit of man so well devised, or so sure established, which in continuance of time hath not been corrupted.

    - Book Of Common Prayer
  • What is life but being conscious? And good and evil are manifestations of consciousness. If you reject one, you're not getting the whole thing that's there to be had.

    - Jerry Garcia
  • Popularity? It is glory's small change.

    - Victor Hugo
  • A gift, with a kind countenance, is a double present.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • It is good to rub and polish our brain against that of others

    - Michel De Montaigne
  • Life is a tough proposition and the first hundred years are the hardest.

    - Wilson Mizner
  • To live is to function. That is all there is in living.

    - Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.
  • When there is no peril in the fight there is no glory in the triumph.

    - Pierre Corneille
  • It is necessary to work, if not from inclination, at least from despair. Everything considered, work is less boring than amusing oneself.

    - Charles Baudelaire
  • It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are.

    - E E Cummings
  • KISS, n. A word invented by the poets as a rhyme for "bliss." It is supposed to signify, in a general way, some kind of rite or ceremony appertaining to a good understanding; but the manner of its performance is unknown to this lexicographer.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • The true aim of everyone who aspires to be a teacher should be, not to impart his own opinions, but to kindle minds.

    - Frederick William Robertson
  • I will govern my life and thoughts as if the whole world were to see the one and read the other, for what does it signify to make anything a secret to my neighbor, when to God, who is the searcher of our hearts, all our privacies are open?

    - Seneca
  • I could never think well of a man's intellectual or moral character, if he was habitually unfaithful to his appointments.

    - Nathaniel Emmons
  • The test of a first-fate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. One should, for example, be able to see that things are hopeless and yet be determined to make them otherwise.

    - F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • There is no wealth but life.

    - John Ruskin
  • Those who stare at the past have their backs turned to the future.

    - Unknown
  • Faith in the ability of a leader is of slight service unless it be united with faith in his justice.

    - George Goethals
  • A really great man is known by three signs... generosity in the design, humanity in the execution, moderation in success.

    - Otto Von Bismarck
  • Never give a sucker an even break.

    - W. C. Fields
  • We learn from experience that men never learn anything from experience.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • Retirement at sixty-five is ridiculous. When I was sixty-five I still had pimples.

    - George Burns
  • We all carry around so much pain in our hearts. Love and pain and beauty. They all seem to go together like one little tidy confusing package. It's a messy business, life. It's hard to figure--full of surprises. Some good. Some bad.

    - Henry Bromel
  • The end of life is to be like God, and the soul following God will be like Him.

    - Socrates
  • The good devout man first makes inner preparation for the actions he has later to perform. His outward actions do not draw him into lust and vice; rather it is he who bends them into the shape of reason and right judgement. Who has a stiffer battle to fight than the man who is striving to conquer himself.

    - Thomas A Kempis
  • The two most abundant things in the universe are Hydrogren and stupidity.

    - Harlan Ellison
  • In the education of children there is nothing like alluring the interest and affection, otherwise you only make so many asses laden with books.

    - Michel De Montaigne
  • Reason and emotion are not antagonists. What seems like a struggle is a struggle between two opposing ideas or values, one of which, automatic and unconscious, manifests itself in the form of a feeling.

    - Nathaniel Branden
  • Who overcomes by force hath overcome but half his foe.

    - John Milton
  • What I wanted to do was work with kids with behavioral and emotional handicaps. It's a puzzle, learning each child, because each child is different.

    - Clay Aiken
  • He is a benefactor of mankind who contracts the great rules of life into short sentences, that may be easily impressed on the memory, and so recur habitually to the mind.

    - Samuel Johnson
  • When we are capable of living in the moment free from the tyranny of "shoulds," free from the nagging sensation that this moment isn't right, we will have peaceful hearts.

    - Joan Borysenko
  • All human beings should try to learn before they die what they are running from, and to, and why.

    - James Thurber
  • The law must be stable, but it must not stand still.

    - Roscoe Pound
  • Why don't you want to do what you know you should do? The reason you don't is that you are in conflict with yourself.

    - Tom Hopkins
  • Life was meant to be lived, and curiosity must be kept alive. One must never, for whatever reason, turn his back on life.

    - Hyman Rickover
  • Government, is the last analysis, is organized opinion. Where there is little or no public opinion, there is likely to be bad government.

    - Mackenzie King
  • All confidence which is not absolute and entire, is dangerous. There are few occasions but where a man ought either to say all, or conceal all; for, how little so ever you have revealed of your secret to a friend, you have already said too much if you think it not safe to make him privy to all particulars.

    - Francis Beaumont
  • A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!

    - William Shakespeare
  • No matter how hard you work for success if your thought is saturated with the fear of failure, it will kill your efforts, neutralize your endeavors and make success impossible.

    - Baudjuin
  • Any colour - so long as it's black.

    - Henry Ford
  • He who chooses the beginning of the road chooses the place it leads to. It is the means that determines the end.

    - Harry Emerson Fosdick
  • GORGON, n.The Gorgon was a maiden boldWho turned to stone the Greeks of oldThat looked upon her awful brow.We dig them out of ruins now,And swear that workmanship so badProves all the ancient sculptors mad.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Happiness depends upon ourselves.

    - Aristotle
  • The name of peace is sweet, and the thing itself is beneficial, but there is a great difference between peace and servitude. Peace is freedom in tranquillity, servitude is the worst of all evils, to be resisted not only by war, but even by death.

    - Cicero
  • Three failures denote uncommon strength. A weakling has not enough grit to fail thrice.

    - Minna Thomas Antrim
  • A good conscience is to the soul what health is to the body; it preserves constant ease and serenity within us; and more than countervails all the calamities and afflictions which can befall us from without.

    - Joseph Addison
  • Bad temper is its own scourge. Few things are more bitter than to feel bitter. A man's venom poisons himself more than his victim.

    - Charles Buxton
  • Revolution is not a onetime event.

    - Audre Lorde
  • Visible goodwill is the strongest negotiation strategy. Don't let somebody else determine your behavior.

    - Dr. S. U. Sunrei
  • [Spring is] when life's alive in everything.

    - Christina Rossetti
  • We all take different paths in life, but no matter where we go, we all take a little of each other everywhere.

    - Tim Mcgraw
  • The very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. Instead of altering their views to fit the facts, they alter the facts to fit their views...which can be very uncomfortable if you happen to be one of the facts that needs altering.

    - Doctor Who
  • Procrastination is the thief of time.

    - Edward Young
  • Simplicity is the peak of civilization.

    - Jessie Sampter
  • I believe in the forgiveness of sin and the redemption of ignorance.

    - Adlai E. Stevenson, Jr
  • When you have only two pennies left in the world, buy a loaf of bread with one, and a lily with the other.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • If you don't risk anything you risk even more.

    - Erica Jong
  • Our envy of others devours us most of all.

    - Alexander Solzhenitsyn
  • I will not add another word.

    - Horace
  • Thought means life, since those who do not think so do not live in any high or real sense. Thinking makes the man.

    - Amos Bronson Alcott
  • No man really becomes a fool until he stops asking questions.

    - Charles Steinmetz
  • If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • It doesn't matter if people are interested. It's about you taking your stuff and shouting out into the void.

    - Jadelr And Cristina Cordova
  • I bet you if I had met him [Trotsky] and had a chat with him, I would have found him a very interesting and human fellow, for I never yet met a man that I didn't like.

    - Will Rogers
  • None but a coward dares to boast that he has never known fear.

    - Ferdinand Foch
  • What you do speaks so loud that I cannot hear what you say.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • The idea that men are created free and equal is both true and misleading: men are created different; they lose their social freedom and their individual autonomy in seeking to become like each other.

    - David Riesman
  • A tart temper never mellows with age, and a sharp tongue is the only edged tool that grows keener with constant use.

    - Washington Irving
  • There are three ingredients in the good life: learning, earning, and yearning.

    - Christopher Morley
  • Conscience has nothing to do as lawgiver or judge; but is a witness against me if I do wrong, and which approves if I do right. To act against conscience is to act against reason and God's Law.

    - Arthur Phelps
  • It's odd that you can get so anesthetized by your own pain or your own problem that you don't quite fully share the hell of someone close to you.

    - Lady Bird Johnson
  • LOW-BRED, adj. "Raised" instead of brought up.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • "It happens to each according to his consciousness," is the Law of Consciousness.

    - L. S. Barksdale
  • An eye for eye only ends up making the whole world blind.

    - Mahatma Gandhi
  • Our greatest natural resource is the minds of our children.

    - Walt Disney
  • I cannot live without books.

    - Thomas Jefferson
  • Infinite striving to be the best is man's duty, it is it's own reward. Everything else is in God's hands.

    - Mahatma Gandhi
  • If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.

    - Harry S Truman
  • Life is a banquet, and most poor suckers are starving.

    - Rosalind Russell
  • The whole drift of my education goes to persuade me that the world of our present consciousness is only one out of many worlds of consciousness that exist.

    - William James
  • To get the best out of a man go to what is best in him.

    - Daniel Considine
  • Freedom is not worth having if it does not include the freedom to make mistakes.

    - Mahatma Gandhi
  • Youth is a wonderful thing. What a crime to waste it on children.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • Mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.

    - Charles Dickens
  • If I have any beliefs about immortality, it is that certain dogs I have known will go to heaven, and very, very few persons.

    - James Thurber
  • HABEAS CORPUS. A writ by which a man may be taken out of jail when confined for the wrong crime.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • Nobody is ever met at the airport when beginning a new adventure. It's just not done.

    - Elizabeth Warnock Fernea
  • Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books; but love from look, toward school with heavy looks.

    - William Shakespeare
  • When I only begin to read, I forget I'm on this world. It lifts me on wings with high thoughts.

    - Anzia Yezierska
  • The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • Results are what you expect, and consequences are what you get.

    - Author Unknown
  • When you have an efficient government, you have a dictatorship.

    - Harry S Truman
  • GRAPE, n.Hail noble fruit! -- by Homer sung,Anacreon and Khayyam;Thy praise is ever on the tongueOf better men than I am.The lyre in my hand has never swept,The song I cannot offer:My humbler service pray accept --I'll help to kill the scoffer.The water-drinkers and the cranksWho load their skins with liquor --I'll gladly bear their belly-tanksAnd tap them with my sticker.Fill up, fill up, for wisdom coolsWhen e'er we let the wine rest.Here's death to Prohibition's fools,And every kind of vine-pest!Jamrach Holobom

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Every serious-minded person knows that a large part of the effort required in moral discipline consists in the courage needed to acknowledge the unpleasant consequences of one's past and present acts.

    - John Dewey
  • We read frequently if unknowingly, in quest of a mind more original than our own.

    - Harold Bloom
  • Carry out a random act of kindness, with no expectation of reward, safe in the knowledge that one day someone might do the same for you.

    - Diana Spencer
  • To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already three parts dead.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • I dwell in possibility...

    - Emily Dickinson
  • The follies which a man regrets the most in his life are those which he didn't commit when he had the opportunity.

    - Helen Rowland
  • One should as a rule respect public opinion in so far as is necessary to avoid starvation and to keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny, and is likely to interfere with happiness in all kinds of ways.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • Statistician: A man who believes figures don't lie, but admits that under analysis some of them won't stand up either.

    - Evan Esar
  • Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings.

    - William Wordsworth
  • A week is a long time in politics.

    - Harold Wilson
  • The best cure for worry, depression, melancholy, brooding, is to go deliberately forth and try to lift with one's sympathy the gloom of somebody else.

    - Arnold Bennett
  • Whoever controls the media--the images--controls the culture.

    - Allen Ginsberg
  • Every man, wherever he goes, is encompassed by a cloud of comforting convictions, which move with him like flies on a summer day.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • To know the road ahead, ask those coming back.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • Too often we...enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought.

    - John F. Kennedy
  • If the aborigine drafted an IQ test, all of Western civilization would presumably flunk it.

    - Stanley Garn
  • Courage is doing what you're afraid to do. There can be no courage unless you're scared.

    - Eddie Rickenbacker
  • The eternal silence of these infinite spaces fills me with dread.

    - Blaise Pascal
  • Most of the basic truths of life sound absurd at first hearing.

    - Elizabeth Goudge
  • The only thing that will redeem mankind is cooperation.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • If a man cannot forget, he will never amount to much.

    - Søren Kierkegaard
  • Success in business requires training and discipline and hard work. But if you're not frightened by these things, the opportunities are just as great today as they ever were.

    - David Rockefeller
  • He who is not contented with what he has, would not be contented with what he would like to have.

    - Socrates
  • We do not inherit this land from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children.

    - Haida Indian Saying
  • Live as you will have wished to have lived when you are dying.

    - Christian Furchtegott Gellert
  • The illusion that times that were are better than those that are, has probably pervaded all ages.

    - Horace Greeley
  • Always try to do something for the other fellow and you will be agreeably surprised how things come your way - how many pleasing things are done for you.

    - Claude M Bristol
  • When mom found my diaphram, I told her it was a bathing cap for my cat.

    - Liz Winston
  • Learn to be pleased with everything; with wealth, so far as it makes us beneficial to others; with poverty, for not having much to care for; and with obscurity, for being unenvied.

    - Plutarch
  • I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations.

    - James Madison
  • I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts.

    - John Locke
  • The worst loneliness is not to be comfortable with yourself.

    - Mark Twain
  • To be always fortunate, and to pass through life with a soul that has never known sorrow, is to be ignorant of one half of nature.

    - Seneca
  • Marvelous Truth, confront us at every turn, in every guise.

    - Denise Levertov
  • When it comes to sex, the most important six inches are the ones between the ears.

    - Dr. Ruth Westheimer
  • Honesty pays, but it doesn't seem to pay enough to suit some people.

    - Kin Hubbard
  • Partake of some of life's sweet pleasures. And yes, get comfortable with yourself.

    - Oprah Winfrey
  • Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

    - Robert Heinlein
  • I have never found, in a long experience of politics, that criticism is ever inhibited by ignorance.

    - Harold Macmillan
  • For a thinking creature of high intellect there can be no pleasure separate from emotion. If you deny men emotion you deny them pleasure.

    - Dean Koontz
  • It is nobler to declare oneself wrong than to insist on being right - especially when one is right.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Ethical axioms are found and tested not very differently from the axioms of science. Truth is what stands the test of experience.

    - Albert Einstein
  • I am ashamed of confessing that I have nothing to confess.

    - Fanny Burney
  • Only strength can cooperate. Weakness can only beg.

    - Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • PLENIPOTENTIARY, adj. Having full power. A Minister Plenipotentiary is a diplomatist possessing absolute authority on condition that he never exert it.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • We must uphold the promise of Roosevelt, Truman, Kennedy, Johnson, Carter, and Clinton and never allow the President and his Republican friends to threaten Social Security by putting it on the Wall Street trading block.

    - John Kerry
  • The sign of an intelligent people is their ability to control emotions by the application of reason.

    - Marya Mannes
  • Truth has beauty, power and necessity.

    - Sylvia Ashton-Warner
  • Van Gogh became a painter because he had no ear for music.

    - Nikki Harris
  • Talking with you is sort of the conversational equivalent of an out of body experience.

    - Calvin & Hobbes
  • Think like a wise man but communicate in the language of the people.

    - William Butler Yeats
  • Courage is grace under pressure.

    - Ernest Hemingway
  • I don't want to be a passenger in my own life.

    - Diane Ackerman
  • He who laughs last didn't get it.

    - Helen Giangregorio
  • When a resolute young fellow steps up to the great bully, the world, and takes him boldly by the beard, he is often surprised to find it comes off in his hand, and that it was only tied on to scare away the timid adventurers.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Courage is a special kind of knowledge; the knowledge of how to fear what ought to be feared and how not to fear what ought not to be feared.

    - David Ben-Gurion
  • If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?

    - Albert Einstein
  • Logic merely enables one to be wrong with authority.

    - Doctor Who
  • You don't just luck into things as much as you'd like to think you do. You build step by step, whether it's friendships or opportunities.

    - Barbara Bush
  • I was brought up to believe that how I saw myself was more important than how others saw me.

    - Anwar El-Sadat
  • Only in quiet waters do things mirror themselves undistorted. Only in a quiet mind is adequate perception of the world.

    - Hans Margolius
  • There is an applause superior to that of the multitudes: one's own.

    - Elizabeth Elton Smith
  • According to classical aerodynamics, it is impossible for a bumblebee to fly.

    - Doctor Who
  • A suspicious mind always looks on the black side of things.

    - Publilius Syrus
  • All of the significant battles are waged within the self.

    - Sheldon Kopp
  • But did thee feel the earth move?

    - Ernest Hemingway
  • Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death.

    - Harold Wilson
  • Ever notice that what the hell is always the right decision?

    - Marilyn Monroe
  • Be humble for you are made of earth. Be noble for you are made of stars.

    - Serbian Proverb
  • Conscience is the root of all true courage; if a man would be brave let him obey his conscience.

    - James F. Clarke
  • My bounce-around life had taught me that dreams were dangerous things - they look solid in your mind, but you just try to reach for them. It's like gathering clouds.

    - Kirby Larson
  • I was always looking outside myself for strength and confidence but it comes from within. It is there all the time.

    - Anna Freud
  • HEAT, n.Heat, says Professor Tyndall, is a modeOf motion, but I know now how he's provingHis point; but this I know -- hot words bestowedWith skill will set the human fist a-moving,And where it stops the stars burn free and wild._Crede expertum_ -- I have seen them, child.Gorton Swope

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • It's a poor sort of memory that only works backward.

    - Lewis Carroll
  • If life was fair, Elvis would be alive and all the impersonators would be dead.

    - Johnny Carson
  • The day soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you have stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help them or concluded that you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership.

    - Colin Powell
  • You can be pleased with nothing when you are not pleased with yourself.

    - Lady Mary Wortley Montagu
  • I cannot conceive otherwise than that He, the Infinite Father, expects or requires no worship or praise from us, but that He is even infinitely above it.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • ME, pro. The objectionable case of I. The personal pronoun in English has three cases, the dominative, the objectionable and the oppressive. Each is all three.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • It is a sad fact that 50 percent of marriages in this country end in divorce. But hey, the other half end in death. You could be one of the lucky ones!

    - Richard Jeni
  • Sometimes we are lucky enough to know our lives have been changed, to discard the old and embrace the new and run headlong down an immutable course. It happened to me... on that summer's day when my eyes were opened to the sea.

    - Jacques Yves-Cousteau
  • What you risk reveals what you value.

    - Jeanette Winterson
  • Anger is a signal, and one worth listening to.

    - Harriet Lerner
  • I quote others only in order the better to express myself.

    - Michel De Montaigne
  • You don't have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.

    - Ray Bradbury
  • Instead of loving your enemies, treat your friends a little better.

    - Ed Howe
  • The fickleness of the women I love is only equalled by the infernal constancy of the women who love me.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • An idea is a feat of association.

    - Robert Frost
  • Depend not on fortune, but on conduct.

    - Publilius Syrus
  • 'Tis the most tender part of love, each other to forgive.

    - John Sheffield
  • Dare to be yourself.

    - Andre Gide
  • If you look for truth, you may find comfort in the end; if you look for comfort you will not get either comfort or truth only soft soap and wishful thinking to begin, and in the end, despair.

    - C. S. Lewis
  • Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • There is no They, Only Us.

    - Graffito
  • People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading.

    - Logan Pearsall Smith
  • If it is to be, it is up to me.

    - Unknown
  • Adversity has the effect of eliciting talents, which in prosperous circumstances would have lain dormant.

    - Horace
  • He had a certain frankness and generosity, qualities indeed which turn to a man's ruin, unless tempered with discretion.

    - Cornelius Tacitus
  • MAMMALIA, n.pl. A family of vertebrate animals whose females in a state of nature suckle their young, but when civilized and enlightened put them out to nurse, or use the bottle.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • In every aspect of our lives, we are always asking ourselves, How am I of value? What is my worth? Yet I believe that worthiness is our birthright.

    - Oprah Winfrey
  • The secret of education lies in respecting the pupil.

    - Emerson
  • No great man ever complains of want of opportunity.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Our lives improve only when we take chances - and the first and most difficult risk we can take is to be honest with ourselves.

    - Walter Anderson
  • Truth is the only safe ground to stand upon.

    - Elizabeth Cady Stanton
  • It should be a very happy marriage --- they are both so much in love with him.

    - Irene Thomas
  • Beware of the man whose God is in the skies.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • I have always regarded myself as the pillar of my life.

    - Meryl Streep
  • PLUNDER, v. To take the property of another without observing the decent and customary reticences of theft. To effect a change of ownership with the candid concomitance of a brass band. To wrest the wealth of A from B and leave C lamenting a vanishing opportunity.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • If toast always lands butter-side down, and cats always land on their feet, what happen if you strap toast on the back of a cat and drop it?

    - Steven Wright
  • All the world is queer save thee and me. And even thou art a little queer.

    - Sir Robert Owen
  • The ultimate indignity is to be given a bedpan by a stranger who calls you by your first name.

    - Maggie Kuhn
  • Learning is not compulsory... neither is survival.

    - W. Edwards Deming
  • The guy who takes a chance, who walks the line between the known and unknown, who is unafraid of failure, will succeed.

    - Gordon Parks
  • Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.

    - Adelle Davis
  • Falling out of love is very enlightening. For a short while you see the world with new eyes.

    - Iris Murdoch
  • There's a pinch of the madman in every great man.

    - Unknown
  • This Rock has become an object of veneration in the United States. I have seen bits of it carefully preserved in several towns in the Union. Does this sufficiently show that all human power and greatness is in the soul of man? Here is a stone which the feet of a few outcasts pressed for an instant; and the stone becomes famous; it is treasured by a great nation; its very dust is shared as a relic.

    - Alexis De Tocqueville
  • PRAY, v. To ask that the laws of the universe be annulled in behalf of a single petitioner confessedly unworthy.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Nothing is so good as it seems beforehand.

    - George Eliot
  • We must dare to think "unthinkable" thoughts. We must learn to explore all the options and possibilities that confront us in a complex and rapidly changing world. We must learn to welcome and not to fear the voices of dissent. We must dare to think about "unthinkable things" because when things become unthinkable, thinking stops and action becomes mindless.

    - J. William Fulbright
  • Never refuse any advance of friendship, for if nine out of ten bring you nothing, one alone may repay you.

    - Madame De Tencin
  • A promise made is a debt unpaid.

    - Robert W. Service
  • Better keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you must see the world.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • All growth is a leap in the dark, a spontaneous unpremeditated act without the benefit of experience.

    - Henry Miller
  • Never grow a wishbone where your backbone ought to be.

    - Clementine Paddleford
  • A man is so in the way in the house.

    - Elizabeth Gaskell
  • One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.

    - Jane Austen
  • The easiest way for your children to learn about money is for you not to have any.

    - Katharine Whitehorn
  • Sport is imposing order on what was chaos.

    - Anthony Starr
  • If you see in any given situation only what everybody else can see, you can be said to be so much a representative of your culture than you are a victim of it.

    - S. I. Hayakawa
  • When spider webs unite, they can tie up a lion.

    - Ethiopian Proverb
  • If you can walk you can dance, if you can talk you can sing.

    - Zimbabwean Proverb
  • Character can not be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved.

    - Helen Keller
  • Heirlooms we don't have in our family. But stories we've got.

    - Rose Cherin
  • If there is one thing worse than being an ugly duckling in a house of swans, it's having the swans pretend there's no difference.

    - Teena Booth
  • Daughters go into analysis hating their fathers and come out hating their mothers. They never come out hating themselves.

    - Laurie Jo Wojcik
  • Here's a message to the new borns, waiting to breathe: if you believe then you can achieve. Just look at me, against all odds 'though life is hard, we carry on, livin' in the projects, broke with no lights on. To all the seeds that follow me- protect your essence, born with less, but you still precious.

    - Tupac Shakur
  • We cannot destroy kindred: Our chains stretch a little sometimes, but they never break.

    - Marie De Rabutin-Chantal
  • To play it safe is not to play.

    - Robert Altman
  • Where large sums of money are concerned, it is advisable to trust nobody.

    - Agatha Christie
  • The more you run over a dead cat, the flatter it gets.

    - Unknown
  • There is in us a lyric germ or nucleus which deserves respect; it bids a man to ponder or create; and in this dim corner of himself he can take refuge and find consolations which the society of his fellow creatures does not provide.

    - Norman Douglas
  • I think it's the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately.

    - George Carlin
  • The real object of education is to have a man in the condition of continually asking questions.

    - Bishop Creighton
  • I am my nearest neighbour.

    - Cornelius Tacitus
  • The family is changing not disappearing. We have to broaden our understanding of it, look for the new metaphors.

    - Mary Catherine Bateson
  • Listen; there's a hell of a good universe next door: let's go.

    - E E Cummings
  • You can never plan the future by the past.

    - Edmund Burke
  • Honesty may be the best policy, but it's important to remember that apparently, by elimination, dishonesty is the second-best policy.

    - George Carlin
  • Grief can take care of itself, but to get the full value of a joy you must have somebody to divide it with.

    - Mark Twain
  • Baby: an alimentary canal with a loud voice at one end and no responsibility at the other.

    - Elizabeth Adamson
  • When I'm good, I'm very, very good. When I'm bad, I'm better.

    - Mae West
  • The scornful nostril and the high head gather not the odors that lie on the track of truth.

    - George Eliot
  • I like any reaction I can get with my music. Just anything to get people to think. I mean if you can get a whole room full of drunk, stoned people to actually wake up and think, you're doing something.

    - Jim Morrison
  • The resounding echo of the mortal coil, echoes in the ears of those who are unprepared for it. To some, it sounds like a symphony - to others, a death toll.

    - George Melton
  • No man deserves punishment for his thoughts.

    - Anonymous
  • It is through creating, not possessing, that life is revealed.

    - Vida D. Scudder
  • One thing the inventors can't seem to get the bugs out of is fresh paint.

    - Unknown
  • Politeness is half good manners and half good lying.

    - Mary Wilson Little
  • It is only rarely that one can see in a little boy the promise of a man, but one can almost always see in a little girl the threat of a woman.

    - Alexandre Dumas
  • It is a mistake to try to look too far ahead. The chain of destiny can only be grasped one link at a time.

    - Sir Winston Churchill
  • Seize opportunity by the beard, for it is bald behind.

    - Bulgarian Proverb
  • Not life, but good life, is to be chiefly valued.

    - Socrates
  • An apology for the devil: it must be remembered that we have heard only one side of the case; God has written all the books.

    - Samuel Butler
  • It is only with one's heart that one can see clearly. What is essential is invisible to the eye.

    - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  • I am still determined to be cheerful and happy, in whatever situation I may be; for I have also learned from experience that the greater part of our happiness or misery depends upon our dispositions, and not upon our circumstances.

    - Martha Washington
  • Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently. For in the very torrent, tempest, and as I may say, whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness.

    - William Shakespeare
  • To value riches is not to be covetous. They are the gift of God, and, like every gift of his, good in themselves, and capable of a good use. But to overvalue riches, to give them a place in the heart which God did not design them to fill, this is covetousness.

    - H. L. Wayland
  • Whenever you look at a piece of work and you think the fellow was crazy, then you want to pay some attention to that. One of you is likely to be, and you had better find out which one it is. It makes an awful lot of difference.

    - Charles F. Kettering
  • No matter how love-sick a woman is, she shouldn't take the first pill that comes along.

    - Dr. Joyce Brothers
  • A hobby a day keeps the doldrums away.

    - Phyllis Mcginley
  • I do believe it is possible to create, even without ever writing a word or painting a picture, by simply molding one's inner life. And that too is a deed.

    - Etty Hillesum
  • If you want to be free, there is but one way; it is to guarantee an equally full measure of liberty to all your neighbors. There is no other.

    - Carl Schurz
  • 'Tis better to hear a truth which brings a tear, than a lie which brings a smile.

    - J. D. Higgins
  • The skill of writing is to create a context in which other people can think.

    - Edwin Schlossberg
  • A fool judges people by the presents they give him.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • War does not determine who is right-only who is left.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • This is on me.

    - Dorothy Parker
  • I have seen soldiers panic at the first sight of battle, and a wounded squire pulling arrows out from his wound to fight and save his dying horse. Nobility is not a birth right but is defined by one's action.

    - Kevin Costner
  • Take a chance! All life is a chance. The man who goes furthest is generally the one who is willing to do and dare.

    - Dale Carnegie
  • The phone company handles 84 billion calls a year --- everything from kings, queens, and presidents to the scum of the earth.

    - Lily Tomlin
  • Life is beautiful. Life is sad.

    - Vladimir Nabokov
  • Instant gratification is not soon enough.

    - Meryl Streep
  • Even in literature and art, no man who bothers about originality will ever be original: whereas if you simply try to tell the truth (without caring twopence how often it has been told before) you will, nine times out of ten, become original without ever having noticed it.

    - C. S. Lewis
  • Things don't fall apart. Things hold. Lines connect in thin ways that last and last and lives become generations made out of pictures and words just kept.

    - Lucille Clifton
  • The stupid neither forgive nor forget; the naive forgive and forget; the wise forgive but do not forget.

    - Thomas Szasz
  • Men are jerks. Women are psychotic.

    - Kilgore Trout
  • False face must hide what the false heart doth know.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Get the facts, or the facts will get you. And when you get them, get them right, or they will get you wrong.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • Education begins a gentleman, conversation completes him.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • I have learned throughout my life as a composer chiefly through my mistakes and pursuits of false assumptions, not by my exposure to founts of wisdom and knowledge.

    - Igor Stravinsky
  • Have you ever taken something out of the clothes hamper because it had become, relatively, the cleanest thing?

    - Katharine Whitehorn
  • People often say that 'beauty is in the eye of the beholder,' and I say that the most liberating thing about beauty is realizing that you are the beholder. This empowers us to find beauty in places where others have not dared to look, including inside ourselves.

    - Salma Hayek
  • I am treating you as my friend asking you share my present minuses in the hope I can ask you to share my future pluses.

    - Katherine Mansfield
  • Striving for excellence motivates you; striving for perfection is demoralizing.

    - Harriet Braiker
  • Expose yourself to your deepest fear; after that, fear has no power, and the fear of freedom shrinks and vanishes. You are free.

    - Jim Morrison
  • My life may not be scintillating. But living it is more interesting than watching yours.

    - Kevin Cheng
  • Do not be afraid to give up the good to go for the great.

    - Kenny Rogers
  • The joy of a spirit is the measure of its power.

    - Ninon De Lenclos
  • From the persistence of noise comes the insistence of rage.From the emergence of tone comes the divergence of thought.From the enlightenment of music comes the wisdom of... silence.

    - Visions Of Gregorian Chants
  • The loftier the building, the deeper must the foundation be laid.

    - Thomas A Kempis
  • Live among men as if God beheld you; speak to God as if men were listening.

    - Seneca
  • Set all things in their own peculiar place, and know that order is the greatest grace.

    - John Dryden
  • Birds sing after a storm; why shouldn't people feel as free to delight in whatever sunlight remains to them?

    - Rose Kennedy
  • Until you lose your reputation, you never realize what a burden it was or what freedom really is.

    - Margaret Mitchell
  • Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling.

    - Margaret Lee Runbeck
  • Can I ever know you Or you know me?

    - Sara Teasdale
  • In the long run, you hit only what you aim at: Therefore aim high.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • Everyone who gets sleepy at night should have a simple decent place to lay their heads, on terms they can afford to pay.

    - Millard Fuller
  • Eating without conversation is only stoking.

    - Marcelene Cox
  • Mothers, food, love, and career, the four major guilt groups.

    - Cathy Guisewite
  • The person who makes a success of living is the one who see his goal steadily and aims for it unswervingly. That is dedication.

    - Cecil B. Demille
  • The way to do research is to attack the facts at the point of greatest astonishment.

    - Celia Green
  • It is easier to exclude harmful passions than to rule them, and to deny them admittance than to control them after they have been admitted.

    - Seneca
  • Life is like a blanket too short. You pull it up and your toes rebel, you yank it down and shivers meander about your shoulder; but cheerful folks manage to draw their knees up and pass a very comfortable night.

    - Marion Howard
  • Science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality.

    - Carl Sagan
  • Everybody knows if you are too careful you are so occupied in being careful that you are sure to stumble over something.

    - Gertrude Stein
  • The only thing that lasts longer than a friend's love is the stupidity that keeps us from knowing any better.

    - Randy K. Milholland
  • I'm just a person trapped inside a woman's body.

    - Elayne Boosler
  • The enthusiasm of a woman's love is even beyond the biographer's.

    - Jane Austen
  • We can't take any credit for our talents. It's how we use them that counts.

    - Madeleine L'Engle
  • Each generation writes off earlier errors as the result of bad thinking, of less able minds--and then confidently embarks on making fresh errors of its own.

    - Michael Crichton
  • Who would ever think that so much went on in the soul of a young girl?

    - Anne Frank
  • To be a saint does not exclude fine dresses nor a beautiful house.

    - Katherine Tynan Hinkson
  • My father was often angry when I was most like him.

    - Lillian Hellman
  • I never came upon any of my discoveries through the process of rational thinking.

    - Albert Einstein
  • One cannot fix one's eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy.

    - Jane Austen
  • No matter how much spin, effort, lunch or dinner you give the media, they will not fail to notice whether you have won or lost.

    - Robin Renwick
  • The sin which makes you sad and repentant is more liked by Allah than the good deed which turns you arrogant.

    - Imam Ali
  • If what I do prove well, it won't advance.They'll say it's stolen, or else it was by chance.

    - Anne Bradstreet
  • Children today are tyrants. They contradict their parents, gobble their food, and tyrannize their teachers.

    - Socrates
  • The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious.

    - Albert Einstein
  • It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?"

    - Pooh's Little Instruction Book
  • I ran the wrong kind of business, but I did it with integrity.

    - Sydney Biddle Barrows
  • Until you walk a mile in another man's moccasins you can't imagine the smell.

    - Robert Byrne
  • It takes far less courage to kill yourself than it takes to make yourself wake up one more time. It is harder to stay where you are than to get out.

    - Judith Rossner
  • If the wind will not serve, take to the oars.

    - Latin Proverb
  • If I can't have too many truffles, I'll do without truffles.

    - Colette
  • You don't die of a broken heart, you only wish you did.

    - Marilyn Peterson
  • Family dinners are more often than not an ordeal of nervous indigestion, preceded by hidden resentment and ennui and accompanied by psychosomatic jitters.

    - M. F. K. Fisher
  • Success is liking yourself, liking what you do, and liking how you do it.

    - Maya Angelou
  • Statistically the probability of any one of us being here is so small that you would think the mere possibility of existence would keep us all in a contented dazzlement of surprise.

    - Lewis Thomas
  • It is men who wait to be selected, and not those who seek, from whom we may expect the most efficient service.

    - Ulysses S. Grant
  • Listen and attend with the ear of your heart.

    - Saint Benedict
  • Gifts allow us to demonstrate exactly how little we know about a person. And nothing pisses a person off more than being shoved into the wrong pigeonhole.

    - Pam Davis
  • I decided that it was not wisdom that enabled [poets] to write their poetry, but a kind of instinct or inspiration, such as you find in seers and prophets who deliver all their sublime messages without knowing in the least what they mean.

    - Socrates
  • Nothing is said that has not been said before.

    - Terence
  • The golden moments in the stream of life rush past us and we see nothing but sand; the angels come to visit us, and we only know them when they are gone.

    - George Eliot
  • I prefer complexity to certainty, cheerful mysteries to sullen facts.

    - Claude T. Bissell
  • Death … It’s the only thing we haven’t succeeded in completely vulgarizing.

    - Aldous Huxley
  • Those who are unhappy have no need for anything in this world but people capable of giving them their attention.

    - Simone Weil
  • One can search the brain with a microscope and not find the mind, and can search the stars with a telescope and not find God.

    - J. Gustav White
  • It does no harm just once in a while to acknowledge that the whole country isn't in flames, that there are people in the country besides politicians, entertainers, and criminals.

    - Charles Kuralt
  • ...as to moral feeling, this supposed special sense, the appeal to it is indeed superficial when those who cannot think believe that feeling will help them out, even in what concerns general laws: and besides, feelings which naturally differ infinitely in degree cannot furnish a uniform standard of good and evil, nor has any one a right to form judgments for others by his own feelings...

    - Immanuel Kant
  • When we conquer without danger our triumph is without glory.

    - Pierre Corneille
  • To be beneficent when we can is a duty; and besides this, there are many minds so sympathetically constituted that, without any other motive of vanity or self-interest, they find a pleasure in spreading joy around them, and can take delight in the satisfaction of others so far as it is their own work. But I maintain that in such a case an action of this kind, however proper, however amiable it may be, has nevertheless no true moral worth, but is on a level with other inclinations. ... For the maxim lacks the moral import, namely, that such actions be done from duty, not from inclination.

    - Immanuel Kant
  • It's always useful to know where a friend-and-relation is, whether you want him or whether you don't.

    - Rabbit
  • Anger dwells only in the bosom of fools.

    - Albert Einstein
  • To believe with certainty we must begin by doubting.

    - King Stanislas I Of Poland
  • Everyone has talent. What is rare is the courage to follow the talent to the dark place where it leads.

    - Erica Jong
  • For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?

    - Jane Austen
  • I was raised almost entirely on turnips and potatoes, but I think that the turnips had more to do with the effect than the potatoes.

    - Marlene Dietrich
  • The conscientious objector is a revoultionary. On deciding to disobey the law he sacrifices his personal interests to the most important cause of working for the betterment of society.

    - Albert Einstein
  • Act as if the maxim of your action were to become through your will a general natural law

    - Immanuel Kant
  • If you can read this, thank a teacher.

    - Anonymous Teacher
  • Let us have a care not to disclose our hearts to those who shut up theirs against us.

    - Francis Beaumont
  • Men generally believe what they wish.

    - Gaius Julius Caesar
  • A heart is a fragile thing, that's why we protect them so vigorously, give them away so rarely, and why it means so much when we do. Some hearts are more fragile then others, purer somehow. Like crystal in a world of glass. Even the way they shatter is beautiful.

    - John E. Pogue
  • What is more mortifying than to feel that you have missed the plum for want of courage to shake the tree?

    - Logan Pearsall Smith
  • America has never been an empire. We may be the only great power in history that had the chance, and refused – preferring greatness to power and justice to glory.

    - George W. Bush
  • In this business you either sink or swim or you don't.

    - David Smith
  • We simply rob ourselves when we make presents to the dead.

    - Publilius Syrus
  • To live is so startling it leaves little time for anything else.

    - Emily Dickinson
  • If you can't sleep, then get up and do something instead of lying there and worrying. It's the worry that gets you, not the loss of sleep.

    - Dale Carnegie
  • A little government and a little luck are necessary in life, but only a fool trusts either of them.

    - P. J. O'Rourke
  • Heroism on command, senseless violence, and all the loathsome nonsense that goes by the name of patriotism -- how passionately I hate them!

    - Albert Einstein
  • When the grandmothers of today hear the word ``Chippendales,'' they don't necessary think of chairs.

    - Joan Kerr
  • Time is on the side of the oppressed today, it's against the oppressor. Truth is on the side of the oppressed today, it's against the oppressor. You don't need anything else.

    - Malcolm X
  • QUIXOTIC, adj. Absurdly chivalric, like Don Quixote. An insight into the beauty and excellence of this incomparable adjective is unhappily denied to him who has the misfortune to know that the gentleman's name is pronounced Ke-ho-tay.When ignorance from out of our lives can banishPhilology, 'tis folly to know Spanish.Juan Smith

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • There are two ways of resisting war: the legal way and the revolutionary way. The legal way involves the offer of alternatinve service not as a privilege for a few but as a right for all. The revolutionary view involves an uncompromising resistance, with a view to breaking the power of militarism in time of peace or the resources of the state in time of war.

    - Albert Einstein
  • I do not believe the Union will disolve, I believe it will become all one thing, or all the other.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • Call home at least once a week. It's a proven fact that we call home less the older we get. And that's wrong. It should be the other way around. As we get older, our parents get older.

    - Randy Pausch
  • We inhereit from our ancestors gifts so often taken for granted... Each of us contains within... this inheritance of soul. We are links between the ages, containing past and present expectations, sacred memories and future promise.

    - Edward Sellner
  • You should always believe what you read in the newspapers, for that makes them more interesting.

    - Dame Rose Macaulay
  • I don't mind being miserable as long as I'm painting well.

    - Grace Hartigan
  • Love is not a crime, denying it is. Having dreams is not a crime, not chasing them is. Making mistakes is not a crime, not learning from them is. Life is not a crime, not living it is.

    - Alexander Senturia
  • Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    - Albert Einstein
  • After a certain high level of technical skill is achieved, science and art tend to coalesce in esthetics, plasticity, and form. The greatest sceintists are always artists as well.

    - Albert Einstein
  • Summer afternoon - Summer afternoon... the two most beautiful words in the English language.

    - Henry James
  • Writers should be read but not seen. Rarely are they a winsome sight.

    - Edna Ferber
  • Old age means realizing you will never own all the dogs you wanted to.

    - Joe Gores
  • Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome.

    - Booker T. Washington
  • The books that help you most are those which make you think that most. The hardest way of learning is that of easy reading; but a great book that comes from a great thinker is a ship of thought, deep freighted with truth and beauty.

    - Theodore Parker
  • The difference between a rut and a grave is the depth.

    - Gerald Burrill
  • Nothing is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced. It is an open secret that the dangerous increase of crime in this counrty is closely related with this.

    - Albert Einstein
  • For he who sees a need but waits to be asked is already set on cruel refusal.

    - Dante Alighieri
  • All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • In summer, the song sings itself.

    - William Carlos Williams
  • The summer night is like a perfection of thought.

    - Wallace Stevens
  • "Human reason is by nature architectonic."

    - Immanuel Kant
  • Give a man religion without reminding him of his filth, and the result will be arrogance in a three- piece suit. Max Lucado

    - Max Lucado
  • We often do good in order that we may do evil with impunity.

    - Francois De La Rochefoucauld
  • Fear is a journey, a terrible journey, but sorrow is at least an arriving.

    - Alan Paton
  • Beware the fury of a patient man.

    - John Dryden
  • I don't care what is written about me so long as it isn't true.

    - Dorothy Parker
  • I didn't know how babies were made until I was pregnant with my fourth child.

    - Loretta Lynn
  • Women are at last becoming persons first and wives second, and that is as it should be.

    - May Sarton
  • Most women's magazines simply try to mold women into bigger and better consumers.

    - Gloria Steinem
  • I married a German. Every night I dress up as Poland and he invades me.

    - Bette Midler
  • We are drawn to our television sets each April the way we are drawn to the scene of an accident.

    - Vincent Canby
  • The world is so full of a number of thingsI'm sure we should all be as happy as kings.

    - Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Wit is educated insolence.

    - Aristotle
  • It is always easier to believe than to deny. Our minds are naturally affirmative.

    - John Burroughs
  • The cloning of humans is on most of the lists of things to worry about from Science, along with behaviour control, genetic engineering, transplanted heads, computer poetry and the unrestrained growth of plastic flowers.

    - Lewis Thomas
  • Is sloppiness in speech caused by ignorance or apathy? I don't know and I don't care.

    - William Safire
  • You don't have to cook fancy or complicated masterpieces - just good food from fresh ingredients.

    - Julia Child
  • It's just a ride and we can change it any time we want. It's only a choice. No effort, no work, no job, no savings and money, a choice, right now, between fear and love. The eyes of fear want you to put bigger locks on your door, buy guns, close yourself off. The eyes of love instead see all of us as one.

    - Bill Hicks
  • All the sounds of the earth are like music.

    - Oscar Hammerstein Ii
  • It's pretty clear now that what looked like it might have been some kind of counterculture is, in reality, just the plain old chaos of undifferentiated weirdness.

    - Jerry Garcia
  • Our national flower is the concrete cloverleaf.

    - Lewis Mumford
  • I don't like composers who think. It gets in the way of their plagiarism.

    - Howard Dietz
  • If it weren't for Philo T. Farnsworth, inventor of television, we'd still be eating frozen radio dinners.

    - Johnny Carson
  • Es tan corto el amor, y tan largo el olvido.(Love is so short, and forgetting is so long.)

    - Pablo Neruda
  • Do not employ handsome servants.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • The happiest people seem to be those who have no particular reason for being happy except that they are so.

    - William Ralph Inge
  • Try to love someone who you want to hate, because they are just like you, somewhere inside, in a way you may never expect, in a way that resounds so deeply within you that you cannot believe it.

    - Margaret Cho
  • Have not all races had their first unity from a mythology that marries them to rock and hill?

    - William Butler Yeats
  • It is a familiar beast to man, and signifies love.

    - William Shakespeare
  • I stopped believing in Santa Claus at age six when my mother took me to see him in a store and he asked for my autograph.

    - Shirley Temple Black
  • If the world were merely seductive, that would be easy. If it were merely challenging, that would be no problem. But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world, and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.

    - E. B. White
  • I can endure my own despair but not another's hope.

    - William Walsh
  • This is the short and the long of it.

    - William Shakespeare
  • I will make a Star-chamber matter of it.

    - William Shakespeare
  • The beginning is always today.

    - Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
  • Why, then the world's mine oyster,Which I with sword will open.

    - William Shakespeare
  • She is a friend of my mind... The pieces I am, she gather them and give them back to me in all the right order.

    - Toni Morrison
  • Every English poet should master the rules of grammar before he attempts to bend or break them.

    - Robert Graves
  • We work in the dark - we do what we can - we give what we have. Our doubt is our passion, and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art.

    - Henry James
  • A friend is a second self.

    - Aristotle
  • Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.

    - William Shakespeare
  • I don't like to think of laws as rules you have to follow, but more as suggestions.

    - George Carlin
  • Strong beliefs win strong men, and then make them stronger.

    - Walter Bagehot
  • I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to. It belongs to you. It belongs to you. I was never the likeliest candidate for this office. We didn't start with much money or many endorsements. Our campaign was not hatched in the halls of Washington. It began in the backyards of Des Moines and the living rooms of Concord and the front porches of Charleston. It was built by working men and women who dug into what little savings they had to give $5 and $10 and $20 to the cause.

    - Barack Obama
  • Happiness is not achieved by the conscious pursuit of happiness; it is generally the by-product of other activities.

    - Aldous Huxley
  • If I hadn't started painting, I would have raised chickens.

    - Grandma Moses
  • My favorite animal is steak.

    - Fran Lebowitz
  • ABNORMAL, adj. Not conforming to standard. In matters of thought and conduct, to be independent is to be abnormal, to be abnormal is to be detested. Wherefore the lexicographer adviseth a striving toward the straiter [sic] resemblance of the Average Man than he hath to himself. Whoso attaineth thereto shall have peace, the prospect of death and the hope of Hell.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • ABRUPT, adj. Sudden, without ceremony, like the arrival of a cannon- shot and the departure of the soldier whose interests are most affected by it. Dr. Samuel Johnson beautifully said of another author's ideas that they were "concatenated without abruption."

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • ABSOLUTE, adj. Independent, irresponsible. An absolute monarchy is one in which the sovereign does as he pleases so long as he pleases the assassins. Not many absolute monarchies are left, most of them having been replaced by limited monarchies, where the sovereign's power for evil (and for good) is greatly curtailed, and by republics, which are governed by chance.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Even with the best of maps and instruments, we can never fully chart our journeys.

    - Gail Pool
  • Difficulties show men what they are. In case of any difficulty remember that God has pitted you against a rough antagonist that you may be a conqueror, and this cannot be without toil.

    - Epictetus
  • We have two ears and one mouth so we may listen more and talk the less.

    - Epictetus
  • The revolution is not an apple that falls when it is ripe. You have to make it fall.

    - Che Guevara
  • I've always been crazy, but it's kept me from going insane.

    - Waylon Jennings
  • Never be ashamed! There's some who'll hold it against you, but they're not worth bothering with.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • It is far more important to me to preserve an unblemished conscience than to compass any object however great.

    - William Ellery Channing
  • No one is ready for a thing until he believes he can acquire it.

    - Napoleon Hill
  • What we’re saying today is that you're either part of the solution or you’re part of the problem.

    - Eldridge Cleaver
  • Women's virtue is man's greatest invention.

    - Cornelia Otis Skinner
  • Drop out of school before your mind rots from our mediocre educational system.

    - Frank Zappa
  • It's not the men in my life that count, it's the life in my men.

    - Mae West
  • Technology: No Place for Wimps!

    - Scott Adams
  • Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome.

    - Arthur Ashe
  • The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried.

    - G. K. Chesterton
  • REASON, v.i. To weight probabilities in the scales of desire.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • We all like stories that make us cry. It's so nice to feel sad when you've nothing in particular to feel sad about.

    - Anne Sullivan
  • Thank you for sending me a copy of your book. I'll waste no time reading it.

    - Moses Hadas
  • Love is not just an ecstasy, not just an intense feeling. It is a driving force. It is something that carries us through our life of joyful duty.

    - Arthur Henry King
  • This book fills a much-needed gap.

    - Moses Hadas
  • The key to immortality is first to live a life worth remembering.

    - Bruce Lee
  • I never see what has been done; I only see what remains to be done.

    - Madame Curie
  • Love is the reason for it all.

    - Dorothy Fields
  • The world to a blind man is his touch. The world to a stupid man is his mouth. The world to a great man is his vision.

    - Paul Harvey
  • The Christian resolution to find the world ugly and bad has made the world ugly and bad.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • What a grand thing, to be loved! What a grander thing still, to love!

    - Victor Hugo
  • I am not one of those who in expressing opinions confine themselves to facts.

    - Mark Twain
  • Emotions have taught mankind to reason.

    - Vauvenargues
  • A dead thing goes with the stream. Only a living thing can go against it.

    - G. K. Chesterton
  • The longest journey is the journey inward.

    - Dag Hammarskjold
  • A hypocrite is a person who--but who isn't?

    - Don Marquis
  • Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast.

    - William Shakespeare
  • I pack my trunk, embrace my friends, embark on the sea, and at last wake up in Naples, and there beside me is the Stern Fact, the Sad Self, unrelenting, identical, that I fled from.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • It's not practice that makes perfect....but perfect practice that makes perfect.

    - Cal Ripken Sr.
  • ACADEMY, n. [from ACADEME] A modern school where football is taught.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • WASHINGTONIAN, n. A Potomac tribesman who exchanged the privilege of governing himself for the advantage of good government. In justice to him it should be said that he did not want to.They took away his vote and gave insteadThe right, when he had earned, to _eat_ his bread.In vain -- he clamors for his "boss," pour soul,To come again and part him from his roll.Offenbach Stutz

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Brevity is the soul of wit.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Love isn't a decision. It's a feeling. If we could decide who we loved, it would be much simpler, but much less magical.

    - Trey Parker And Matt Stone
  • No poet sings because he must sing. At least no great poet does. A great poet sings because he chooses to sing

    - Author Unknown
  • No matter what we have come through, or how many perils we have safely passed, or how many imperfect and jagged - in some places perhaps irreparably - our life has been, we cannot in our heart of hearts imagine how it could have been different. As we look back on it, it slips in behind us in orderly array, and, with all its mistakes, acquires a sort of eternal fitness, and even, at times, of poetic glamour.

    - Randolph Silliman Bourne
  • I thank God I am as honest as any man living that is an old man and no honester than I.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Men are so stupid and concerned with their present needs, they will always let themselves be deceived.

    - Machiavelli
  • Every great and commanding moment in the annals of the world is the triumph of some enthusiasm.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • I can't be running back and forth forever between grief and high delight.

    - J. D. Salinger
  • It all depends on how we look at things, and not on how they are themselves.

    - Carl Jung
  • The word "happiness" would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness.

    - Carl Jung
  • A successful lie is doubly a lie; an error which has to be corrected is a heavier burden than the truth.

    - Dag Hammarskjold
  • Imperfection is inherited, therefore we all sin, but fighting the war of sin is the greatest war of all because we all die in the end no matter how hard we fight.

    - Tupac Shakur
  • I tasted too what was called the sweet of revenge - but it was transient, it expired even with the object, that provoked it.

    - Ann Radcliffe
  • RECONSIDER, v. To seek a justification for a decision already made.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • One man has enthusiasm for 30 minutes, another for 30 days, but it is the man who has it for 30 years who makes a success of his life.

    - Edward B. Butler
  • Oh, what a dear ravishing thing is the beginning of an Amour!

    - Aphra Behn
  • My soldiers ask of me, why surrender a military advantage in the field ... I could not answer.

    - General Douglas Macarthur
  • I think that their flight from and hatred of technology is self-defeating. The Buddha rests quite as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer of the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain or in the petals of a flower. To think otherwise is to demean the Buddha--which is to demean oneself.

    - Robert M. Pirsig
  • The very purpose of existence is to reconcile the glowing opinion we have of ourselves with the appalling things that other people think about us.

    - Quentin Crisp
  • I suggest that the only books that influence us are those for which we are ready, and which have gone a little farther down our own particular path than we have yet got ourselves.

    - E. M. Forster
  • Read much, but not many books.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • By listening to his language of his locality the poet begins to learn his craft. It is his function to lift, by use of imagination and the language he hears, the material conditions and appearances of his environment to the sphere of the intelligence where they will have new currency.

    - William Carlos Williams
  • WEAKNESSES, n.pl. Certain primal powers of Tyrant Woman wherewith she holds dominion over the male of her species, binding him to the service of her will and paralyzing his rebellious energies.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Knowledge rests not upon truth alone, but upon error also.

    - Carl Jung
  • There is no kind of dishonesty into which otherwise good people more easily and frequently fall than that of defrauding the government.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • Blaise Pascal used to mark with charcoal the walls of his playroom, seeking a means of making a circle perfectly round and a triangle whose sides and angle were all equal. He discovered these things for himself and then began to seek the relationship which existed between them. He did not know any mathematical terms and so he made up his own. Using these names he made axioms and finally developed perfect demonstrations, until he had come to the thirty-second proposition of Euclid.

    - C. M. Cox
  • ACEPHALOUS, adj. In the surprising condition of the Crusader who absently pulled at his forelock some hours after a Saracen scimitar had, unconsciously to him, passed through his neck, as related by de Joinville.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • FAMOUS, adj. Conspicuously miserable.Done to a turn on the iron, beholdHim who to be famous aspired.Content? Well, his grill has a plating of gold,And his twistings are greatly admired.Hassan Brubuddy

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Fear less, hope more;Whine less, breathe more;Talk less, say more;Hate less, love more;And all good things are yours.

    - "Swedish Proverb"
  • There it was, hidden in alphabetical order.

    - Rita Holt
  • Passion makes the world go round. Love just makes it a safer place.

    - Ice T
  • I'm kind of hooked to the game of art and literature; my heroes are artists and writers.

    - Jim Morrison
  • In democracy it's your vote that counts; In feudalism it's your count that votes.

    - Mogens Jallberg
  • And so faith is closing your eyes and following the breath of your soul down to the bottom of life, where existence and nonexistence have merged into irrelevance. All that matters is the little part you play in the vast drama.

    - Real Live Preacher
  • When ideas fail, words come in very handy.

    - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • Do not fall prey to the false belief that mastery and domination are synonymous with manliness.

    - Kent Nerburn
  • A jest's prosperity lies in the earOf him that hears it, never in the tongueOf him that makes it.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Wind buffs up empty bladders; opinion, fools.

    - Socrates
  • My meaning in saying he is a good man, is to have you understand me that he is sufficient.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Art is either plagiarism or revolution.

    - Paul Gauguin
  • I started concentrating so hard on my vision that I lost sight.

    - Robin Green
  • Isn't it strange that I who have written only unpopular books should be such a popular fellow?

    - Albert Einstein
  • Love is or it ain't. Thin love ain't love at all.

    - Toni Morrison
  • I have thought too much to stoop to action.

    - Adam De L'Isle
  • America is the only country that went from barbarism to decadence without civilization in between.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • Men who never get carried away should be.

    - Malcolm Forbes
  • It isn't kind to cultivate a friendship just so one will have an audience.

    - Lawana Blackwell
  • When you're part of a team, you stand up for your teammates. Your loyalty is to them. You protect them through good and bad, because they'd do the same for you.

    - Yogi Berra
  • A sex symbol becomes a thing. I hate being a thing.

    - Marilyn Monroe
  • Orthodox medicine has not found an answer to your complaint. However, luckily for you, I happen to be a quack.

    - Richter Cartoon Caption
  • Not everyone who drinks is a poet. Some of us drink because we're not poets.

    - Dudley Moore
  • If you want to improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid.

    - Epictetus
  • Why is it that, as a culture, we are more comfortable seeing two men holding guns than holding hands?

    - Ernest Gaines
  • I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me.

    - Ralph Ellison
  • Error of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it.

    - Thomas Jefferson
  • You think your pains and heartbreaks are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, or who have ever been alive.

    - James Baldwin
  • Every silver lining has a touch of grey.

    - Jerry Garcia
  • Youth cannot know how age thinks and feels. But old men are guilty if they forget what it was to be young.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • All we actually have is our body and its muscles that allow us to be under our own power.

    - Allegra Kent
  • I cannot think well of a man who sports with any woman's feelings; and there may often be a great deal more suffered than a stander-by can judge of.

    - Jane Austen
  • ADORE, v.t. To venerate expectantly.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Few men during their lifetime come anywhere near exhausting the resources dwelling in them. There are deep wells of strength that are never used.

    - Richard E. Byrd
  • Treat a person as he is, and he will remain as he is. Treat him as he could be, and will become as he should be.

    - Jimmy Johnson
  • Art is a collaboration between God and the artist, and the less the artist does the better.

    - Andre Gide
  • When truth is nothing but the truth, its unnatural, it's an abstraction that resembles nothing in the real world. In nature there are always so many other irrelevant things mixed up with the essential truth.

    - Aldous Huxley
  • Another unsettling element in modern art is that common symptom of immaturity, the dread of doing what has been done before.

    - Edith Wharton
  • There is a noble manner of being poor and who does not know it will never be rich.

    - Seneca
  • I've always tried to go a step past wherever people expected me to end up.

    - Beverly Sills
  • Excess on occasion is exhilarating. It prevents moderation from acquiring the deadening effect of a habit.

    - W. Somerset Maugham
  • He waited for the mask to drop off, but at the same time he did not question her right to wear it.

    - F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Brothers? Oh, I hate brothers. My older brother just doesn't know when to die, and my younger brothers seem to do nothing but.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • If you put butter and salt on it, it tastes like salty butter.

    - Terry Pratchett
  • Walk through life eager and open to self-improvement and that which is going to best help you evolve, because that's really why were here: to evolve as human beings.

    - Oprah Winfrey
  • True repentance means making amends with the person when at all possible.

    - Lawana Blackwell
  • The fields were fruitful and starving men moved on the roads. The granaries were full and the children of the poor grew up rachitic.

    - John Steinbeck
  • If you believe the doctors, nothing is wholesome; if you believe the theologians, nothing is innocent; if you believe the military, nothing is safe.

    - Lord Salisbury
  • So, throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.

    - Charles Dickens
  • I once said Gazza's IQ was less than his shirt number and he asked me: "What's an IQ?"

    - George Best
  • The mirror never sees itself. The reflection never is itself.

    - J. Gregory Keyes
  • No profit grows where is no pleasure ta'en;In brief, sir, study what you most affect.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Marriage isn't for life any more -- life is too long. Marriage is for love. Love gladly accepts responsibility. Love wants commitment. Marriage should be celebrated as the optimistic and glorious thing that it is. We can't call it a failure if it doesn't last forever.

    - Jeanette Winterson
  • Everyone has a fair turn to be as great as he pleases.

    - Jeremy Collier
  • First secure an independent income, then practice virtue.

    - Greek Proverb
  • It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • If we deny love that is given to us, if we refuse to give love because we fear pain or loss, then our lives will be empty, our loss greater.

    - Unknown
  • True poverty does not come from God.

    - Yiddish Proverb
  • You get fifteen democrats in a room, and you get twenty opinions.

    - Senator Patrick Leahy
  • Love as Thought is Truth.Love as Action is Right Conduct.Love as Understanding is Peace.Love as Feeling is Non-violence.

    - Bhagawan Sri Sathya Sai Baba
  • I generally avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.

    - Mae West
  • The creative act is not performed by the artist alone; the spectator brings the work in contact with the external world by deciphering and interpreting its inner qualifications and thus adds his contribution to the creative act.

    - Marcel Duchamp
  • True is it that we have seen better days.

    - William Shakespeare
  • I don't travel in circles where people say, 'I have faith, I believe this in my heart and nothing you can say or do can shake my faith.' That's just a long-winded religious way to say, 'Shut up.'

    - Penn Jillette
  • He who has not first laid his foundations may be able with great ability to lay them afterwards, but they will be laid with trouble to the architect and danger to the building.

    - Niccolo Machiavelli
  • Trying is the first step towards failure.

    - Homer Simpson
  • The imbecility of men is always inviting the impudence of power.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • The silent bear no witness against themselves.

    - Aldous Huxley
  • ZIGZAG, v.t. To move forward uncertainly, from side to side, as one carrying the white man's burden. (From _zed_, _z_, and _jag_, an Icelandic word of unknown meaning.)He zedjagged so uncomen wydeThet non coude pas on eyder syde;So, to com saufly thruh, I beenConstreynet for to doodge betwene.Munwele

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Help others get ahead. You will always stand taller with someone else on your shoulders.

    - Bob Moawad
  • Forgiveness is letting go of the hope that the past can be changed.

    - Oprah Winfrey
  • It is impossible to imagine Goethe or Beethoven being good at billiards or golf.

    - H. L. Mencken
  • Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more,Or close the wall up with our English dead!In peace there's nothing so becomes a manAs modest stillness and humility;But when the blast of war blows in our ears,Then imitate the action of the tiger:Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Duty without love is deplorable.Duty with love is desirable.Love without duty is Divine.

    - Bhagawan Sri Sathya Sai Baba
  • As you cannot have a sweet and wholesome abode unless you admit the air and sunshine freely into your rooms, so a strong body and a bright, happy, or serene countenance can only result from the free admittance into the mind of thoughts of joy and goodwill and serenity.

    - James Allen
  • I like trees because they seem more resigned to the way they have to live than other things do.

    - Willa Cather
  • Our wisdom comes usually from our experience, and our experience comes largely from our experience.

    - Author Unknown
  • People will accept your ideas much more readily if you tell them Benjamin Franklin said it first.

    - David H. Comins
  • Nothing is easy to the unwilling.

    - Nikki Giovanni
  • Talent does what it can, Genius does what it must.

    - Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • What we play is life.

    - Louis Armstrong
  • With or without religion, you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.

    - Steven Weinberg
  • Sex alleviates tension. Love causes it.

    - Woody Allen
  • He is able who thinks he is able.

    - The Buddha
  • If we aren't capable of being hurt we aren't capable of feeling joy.

    - Madeleine L'Engle
  • Prayer does not change God, but changes him who prays.

    - Søren Kierkegaard
  • ALLEGIANCE, n.This thing Allegiance, as I suppose,Is a ring fitted in the subject's nose,Whereby that organ is kept rightly pointedTo smell the sweetness of the Lord's anointed. G.J.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • I am for those means which will give the greatest good to the greatest number.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • You pray in your distress and in your need; would that you might also pray in the fullness of your joy and in your days of abundance.

    - Kahlil Gibran
  • Tradition is what you resort to when you don't have the time or the money to do it right.

    - Kurt Herbert Alder
  • Each friend represents a world in us, a world possibly not born until they arrive, and it is only by this meeting that a new world is born.

    - Anais Nin
  • Let the minor genius go his light way and enjoy his life - the great nature cannot so live, he is never really in holiday mood, even though he often plucks flowers by the wayside and ties them into knots and garlands like little children and lays out on a sunny morning.

    - W. B. Yeats
  • It is the youth who sees a great opportunity hidden in just these simple services, who sees a very uncommon situation, a humble position, who gets on in the world.

    - Orison Swett Marden
  • Goodness is the only investment that never fails.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • Monsieur l'abbé, I detest what you write, but I would give my life to make it possible for you to continue to write.

    - Voltaire
  • Cats are smarter than dogs. You can't get eight cats to pull a sled through snow.

    - Jeff Valdez
  • As a kid, I knew I wanted to be either a cartoonist or an astronaut. The latter was never much of a possibility, as I don't even like riding in elevators.

    - Bill Watterson
  • War may sometimes be a necessary evil. But no matter how necessary, it is always an evil, never a good. We will not learn how to live together in peace by killing each other's children.

    - Jimmy Carter
  • Everyone is kneaded out of the same dough but not baked in the same oven.

    - Yiddish Proverb
  • All good things are wild, and free.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • There are times when God asks nothing of his children except silence, patience and tears.

    - C. S. Robinson
  • In forming a judgment, lay your hearts void of foretaken opinions; else, whatsoever is done or said, will be measured by a wrong rule; like them who have jaundice, to whom everything appears yellow.

    - Sir Philip Sidney
  • Et tu, Brute!

    - William Shakespeare
  • It is bad luck to be superstitious.

    - Andrew W. Mathis
  • Attacking is the only secret. Dare and the world always yields; or if it beats you sometimes, dare it again and it will succumb.

    - William Makepeace Thackeray
  • That is the hardest thing of all. It is much harder to judge yourself than to judge others. If you succeed in judging yourself, it's because you're truly a wise man.

    - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  • Never despair; but if you do, work on in despair.

    - Edmund Burke
  • Troubles are often the tools God fashions us for better things.

    - Henry Ward Beecher
  • While we have the gift of life, it seems to me that only tragedy is to allow part of us to die - whether it is our spirit, our creativity, or our glorious uniqueness.

    - Gilda Radner
  • I think the mark of a great ruler, is not his ability to make war but to achieve peace.

    - Monica Fairview
  • We have seen better days.

    - William Shakespeare
  • This bud of love, by summer's ripening breath,May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Never argue with a fool. Someone watching may not be able to tell the difference.

    - Anonymous
  • Circumstances rule men and not men rule circumstances.

    - Euripides
  • Your life can't go according to plan if you have no plan.

    - Author Unknown
  • Those who trust to chance must abide by the results of chance.

    - Calvin Coolidge
  • Communism doesn't work because people like to own stuff.

    - Frank Zappa
  • A thousand cups of wine do not suffice when true friends meet, but half a sentence is too much when there is no meeting of minds.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • He is richest who is content with the least.

    - Socrates
  • We have been taught to believe that negative equals realistic and positive equals unrealistic.

    - Susan Jeffers
  • Culture makes all men gentle.

    - Menander
  • If your children look up to you, you've made a success of life's biggest job.

    - Author Unknown
  • The computing field is always in need of new cliches.

    - Alan Perlis
  • A person who trusts no one can't be trusted.

    - Jerome Blattner
  • The ability to delude yourself may be an important survival tool.

    - Jane Wagner
  • There are pauses amidst study, and even pauses of seeming idleness, in which a process goes on which may be likened to the digestion of food. In those seasons of repose, the powers are gathering their strength for new efforts; as land which lies fallow recovers itself for tillage.

    - J. W. Alexander
  • The idea is there, locked inside, and all you have to do is remove the excess stone.

    - Michelangelo
  • It's amazing that the amount of news that happens in the world every day always just exactly fits the newspaper.

    - Jerry Seinfeld
  • If God wanted us to fly, He would have given us tickets.

    - Mel Brooks
  • The pleasures which we most rarely experience give us the greatest delight.

    - Desiderius Erasmus
  • The grace of God means something like: Here is your life. You might never have been, but you are because the party wouldn't have been complete without you. Here is the world. Beautiful and terrible things will happen. Don't be afraid. I am with you. Nothing can ever separate us. It's for you I created the universe. I love you. There's only one catch. Like any other gift, the gift of grace can be yours only if you'll reach out and take it. Maybe being able to reach out and take it is a gift too.

    - Frederick Buechner
  • In order for people to be happy, sometimes they have to take risks. It's true these risks can put them in danger of being hurt.

    - Meg Cabot
  • When you make a mistake, there are only three things you should ever do about it: admit it, learn from it, and don't repeat it.

    - Paul "Bear" Bryant
  • Many books require no thought from those who read them, and for a very simple reason; they made no such demand upon those who wrote them.

    - Charles Caleb Colton
  • There is one way to handle the ignorant and malicious critic. Ignore him.

    - Author Unknown
  • We are prisoners of ideas.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • As for what concerns me in particular I have only in my life carried to an extreme what you have not dared to carry halfway, and what's more, you have taken your cowardice for good sense, and have found comfort in deceiving yourselves.

    - Fyodor Dostoevsky
  • Conscience and reputation are two things. Conscience is due to yourself, reputation to your neighbour.

    - Saint Augustine
  • Fame - a few words upon a tombstone, and the truth of those not to be depended on.

    - John Christian Bovee
  • Conversation is an exercise of the mind; gossip is merely an exercise of the tongue.

    - Author Unknown
  • I trust that everything happens for a reason, even when we're not wise enough to see it.

    - Oprah Winfrey
  • Be you in what line of life you may, it will be amongst your misfortunes if you have not time properly to attend to pecuniary [monetary] matters. Want of attention to these matters has impeded the progress of science and of genius itself.

    - William Cobbett
  • The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them.

    - Lois Mcmaster Bujold
  • Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • Among those whom I like or admire, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can: all of them make me laugh.

    - W. H. Auden
  • To say the least, a town life makes one more tolerant and liberal in one's judgement of others.

    - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • Of all the possessions of this life fame is the noblest; when the body has sunk into the dust the great name still lives.

    - Johann Von Schiller
  • First say to yourself what you would be; and then do what you have to do.

    - Epictetus
  • A good friend of my son's is a son to me.

    - Lois Mcmaster Bujold
  • In my wide association in life, meeting with many and great men in various parts of the world, I have yet to find the man, however great or exalted his station, who did not do better work and put forth greater effort under a spirit of approval than he would ever do under a spirit of criticism.

    - Charles M. Schwab
  • I was going to have cosmetic surgery until I noticed that the doctor's office was full of portraits by Picasso.

    - Rita Rudner
  • It is one of the severest tests of friendship to tell your friend his faults. So to love a man that you cannot bear to see a stain upon him, and to speak painful truth through loving words, that is friendship.

    - Henry Ward Beecher
  • Sin bravely...We will never have all the facts to make a perfect judgement, but with the aid of basic experience we must leap bravely into the future.

    - Russell R. Mcintyre
  • I like this place, and willingly would waste my time in it.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Historians are like deaf people who go on answering questions that no one has asked them.

    - Leo Tolstoy
  • Insignificant events can take on monumental proportions when your head is full of practically nothing.

    - Grace Slick
  • Being natural is simply a pose.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • The less their ability, the more their conceit.

    - Ahad Haam
  • You are young, my son, and, as the years go by, time will change and even reverse many of your present opinions. Refrain therefore awhile from setting yourself up as a judge of the highest matters.

    - Plato
  • In these matters the only certainty is that nothing is certain.

    - Pliny The Elder
  • Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, a charm to sadness, gaiety and life to everything. It is the essence of order, and leads to all that is god, just, and beautiful, of which it is the invisible, but never less, dazzaling, passionate, and eternal form.

    - Plato
  • Practical wisdom is only to be learned in the school of experience. Precepts and instruction are useful so far as they go, but, without the discipline of real life, they remain of the nature of theory only.

    - Samuel Smiles
  • Our lives teach us who we are.

    - Salman Rushdie
  • Nothing in life is static; it either gets better, or it gets worse.

    - Lloyd Dobyns And Clare Crawford-Mason
  • The world wants to be cheated. So cheat.

    - Xaviera Hollander
  • The term "learning disability" has appeal because it implies a specific neurological condition for which no one can be held particularly responsible, and yet it escapes the stigma of mental retardation. There is no implication of neglect, emotional disturbance, or improper training or education, nor does it imply a lack of motivation on the part of the child. For these cosmetic reasons, it is a rather nice term to have around.

    - U. S. Government Study On The Labeling Of Children
  • No one can disgrace us but ourselves.

    - Josh Billings
  • Abundance is, in large part, an attitude.

    - Sue Patton Thoele
  • In idleness there is a perpetual despair.

    - Thomas Carlyle
  • It is not that the child lives in a world of imagination, but that the child within us survives and starts into life only at rare moments of recollection, which makes us believe, and it is not true, that, as children, we were imaginative?

    - Cesare Pavese
  • To endure oneself may be the hardest task in the universe. You cannot hire a wise man or any other intellect to solve it for you. There's no writ of inquest or calling of witness to provide answers. No servant or disciple can dress the wound. You dress it yourself or continue bleeding for all to see.

    - Frank Herbert
  • Being convinced one knows the whole story is the surest way to fail.

    - Philip Crosby
  • Those that respect the law and love sausage should watch neither being made.

    - Mark Twain
  • Even the wisest counsel is useless when it is unheeded.

    - Stephanie Barron
  • What you keep by you, you may change and mend but words, once spoken, can never be recalled.

    - Earl Of Roscommon
  • Fish and visitors smell in three days.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • Habits are cobwebs at first; cables at last.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • The true law of the race is progress and development. Whatever civilization pauses in the march of conquest, it is overthrown by the barbarian.

    - Simms
  • Judge of thine improvement, not by what thou speakest or writest, but by the firmness of thy mind, and the government of thy passions and affections.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • It is characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • All charming people have something to conceal, usually their total dependence on the appreciation of others.

    - Cyril Connolly
  • The best rules to form a young man, are, to talk little, to hear much, to reflect alone upon what has passed in company, to distrust one's own opinions, and value others that deserve it.

    - Sir W. Temple
  • Could we have entered into the mind of Sir Isaac Newton, and have traced all the steps by which he produced his great works, we might see nothing very extraordinary in the process.

    - Joseph Priestley
  • The average person living to age 70 has 613,000 hours of life. This is too long a period not to have fun.

    - Author Unknown
  • Go to other people's funerals or they won't come to yours.

    - Yogi Berra
  • A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  • The public is wonderfully tolerant. It forgives everything except genius.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • If you have the opportunity to play this game of life you need to appreciate every moment. A lot of people don`t appreciate the moment until it's passed.

    - Kanye West
  • There are days when any electrical appliance in the house, including the vacuum cleaner, offers more entertainment than the TV set.

    - Harriet Van Horne
  • We now accept the fact that learning is a lifelong process of keeping abreast of change. And the most pressing task is to teach people how to learn.

    - Peter Drucker
  • Individuals may form communities, but it is institutions alone that can create a nation.

    - Benjamin Disraeli
  • Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.

    - Peter Drucker
  • The eye sees only what the mind is prepared to comprehend.

    - Henri Bergson
  • Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.

    - Cicero
  • Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowlege: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science.

    - Charles Darwin
  • Well has it been said that there is no grief like the grief which does not speak.

    - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • Work is not man's punishment. It is his reward and his strength and his pleasure.

    - George Sand
  • Men are wise in proportion, not to their experience, but to their capacity for experience.

    - James Boswell
  • GENEROUS, adj. Originally this word meant noble by birth and was rightly applied to a great multitude of persons. It now means noble by nature and is taking a bit of a rest.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • GENTEEL, adj. Refined, after the fashion of a gent.Observe with care, my son, the distinction I reveal:A gentleman is gentle and a gent genteel.Heed not the definitions your "Unabridged" presents,For dictionary makers are generally gents.G.J.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MALTHUSIAN, adj. Pertaining to Malthus and his doctrines. Malthus believed in artificially limiting population, but found that it could not be done by talking. One of the most practical exponents of the Malthusian idea was Herod of Judea, though all the famous soldiers have been of the same way of thinking.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • PORTABLE, adj. Exposed to a mutable ownership through vicissitudes of possession.His light estate, if neither he did make itNor yet its former guardian forsake it,Is portable improperly, I take it.Worgum Slupsky

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MATERIAL, adj. Having an actual existence, as distinguished from an imaginary one. Important.Material things I know, or fell, or see;All else is immaterial to me.Jamrach Holobom

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MINE, adj. Belonging to me if I can hold or seize it.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MINOR, adj. Less objectionable.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MINSTREL, adj. Formerly a poet, singer or musician; now a nigger with a color less than skin deep and a humor more than flesh and blood can bear.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • PRESENTABLE, adj. Hideously appareled after the manner of the time and place.In Boorioboola-Gha a man is presentable on occasions of ceremony if he have his abdomen painted a bright blue and wear a cow's tail; in New York he may, if it please him, omit the paint, but after sunset he must wear two tails made of the wool of a sheep and dyed black.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • SYMBOLIC, adj. Pertaining to symbols and the use and interpretation of symbols.They say 'tis conscience feels compunction;I hold that that's the stomach's function,For of the sinner I have notedThat when he's sinned he's somewhat bloated,Or ill some other ghastly fashionWithin that bowel of compassion.True, I believe the only sinnerIs he that eats a shabby dinner.You know how Adam with good reason,For eating apples out of season,Was "cursed." But that is all symbolic: The truth is, Adam had the colic.G.J.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MONOSYLLABIC, adj. Composed of words of one syllable, for literary babes who never tire of testifying their delight in the vapid compound by appropriate googoogling. The words are commonly Saxon -- that is to say, words of a barbarous people destitute of ideas and incapable of any but the most elementary sentiments and emotions.The man who writes in SaxonIs the man to use an ax onJudibras

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MORAL, adj. Conforming to a local and mutable standard of right. Having the quality of general expediency.It is sayd there be a raunge of mountaynes in the Easte, on one syde of the which certayn conducts are immorall, yet on the other syde they are holden in good esteeme; wherebye the mountayneer is much conveenyenced, for it is given to him to goe downe eyther way and act as it shall suite his moode, withouten offence._Gooke's Meditations_

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • RASH, adj. Insensible to the value of our advice."Now lay your bet with mine, nor letThese gamblers take your cash.""Nay, this child makes no bet." "Great snakes!How can you be so rash?"Bootle P. Gish

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • RATIONAL, adj. Devoid of all delusions save those of observation, experience and reflection.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Science is one thing, wisdom is another. Science is an edged tool, with which men play like children, and cut their own fingers.

    - Sir Arthur Eddington
  • If there is anything the nonconformist hates worse than a conformist, it's another nonconformist who doesn't conform to the prevailing standard of nonconformity.

    - Bill Vaughan
  • Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.

    - Theodore Roosevelt
  • How can a question be answered that asks a lifetime of questions?

    - Norman Maclean
  • The least of learning is done in the classrooms.

    - Thomas Merton
  • For the skeptic there remains only one consolation: if there should be such a thing as superhuman law it is administered with subhuman inefficiency.

    - Eric Ambler
  • If thou are a master, be sometimes blind; if a servant, sometimes deaf.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • If absolute power corrupts absolutely, does absolute powerlessness make you pure?

    - Harry Shearer
  • The less a man makes declarative statements the less apt he is to look foolish in retrospect.

    - Quentin Tarantino
  • To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.

    - Thomas Paine
  • They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself.

    - Andy Warhol
  • To fly we have to have resistance.

    - Maya Lin
  • Oregano is the spice of life.

    - Henry J. Tillman
  • ABSENT, adj. Peculiarly exposed to the tooth of detraction; vilifed; hopelessly in the wrong; superseded in the consideration and affection of another.To men a man is but a mind. Who caresWhat face he carries or what form he wears?But woman's body is the woman. O,Stay thou, my sweetheart, and do never go,But heed the warning words the sage hath said:A woman absent is a woman dead.Jogo Tyree

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • DEGENERATE, adj. Less conspicuously admirable than one's ancestors. The contemporaries of Homer were striking examples of degeneracy; it required ten of them to raise a rock or a riot that one of the heroes of the Trojan war could have raised with ease. Homer never tires of sneering at "men who live in these degenerate days," which is perhaps why they suffered him to beg his bread -- a marked instance of returning good for evil, by the way, for if they had forbidden him he would certainly have starved.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • INCOMPOSSIBLE, adj. Unable to exist if something else exists. Two things are incompossible when the world of being has scope enough for one of them, but not enough for both -- as Walt Whitman's poetry and God's mercy to man. Incompossibility, it will be seen, is only incompatibility let loose. Instead of such low language as "Go heel yourself -- I mean to kill you on sight," the words, "Sir, we are incompossible," would convey and equally significant intimation and in stately courtesy are altogether superior.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • EVERLASTING, adj. Lasting forever. It is with no small diffidence that I venture to offer this brief and elementary definition, for I am not unaware of the existence of a bulky volume by a sometime Bishop of Worcester, entitled, _A Partial Definition of the Word "Everlasting," as Used in the Authorized Version of the Holy Scriptures_. His book was once esteemed of great authority in the Anglican Church, and is still, I understand, studied with pleasure to the mind and profit of the soul.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • OFFENSIVE, adj. Generating disagreeable emotions or sensations, as the advance of an army against its enemy. "Were the enemy's tactics offensive?" the king asked. "I should say so!" replied the unsuccessful general. "The blackguard wouldn't come out of his works!"

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • OLD, adj. In that stage of usefulness which is not inconsistent with general inefficiency, as an _old man_. Discredited by lapse of time and offensive to the popular taste, as an _old_ book."Old books? The devil take them!" Goby said."Fresh every day must be my books and bread."Nature herself approves the Goby ruleAnd gives us every moment a fresh fool.Harley Shum

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • RESPLENDENT, adj. Like a simple American citizen beduking himself in his lodge, or affirming his consequence in the Scheme of Things as an elemental unit of a parade.The Knights of Dominion were so resplendent in their velvet-and-gold that their masters would hardly have known them."Chronicles of the Classes"

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • PERIPATETIC, adj. Walking about. Relating to the philosophy of Aristotle, who, while expounding it, moved from place to place in order to avoid his pupil's objections. A needless precaution -- they knew no more of the matter than he.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • CARNIVOROUS, adj. Addicted to the cruelty of devouring the timorous vegetarian, his heirs and assigns.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • CLOSE-FISTED, adj. Unduly desirous of keeping that which many meritorious persons wish to obtain."Close-fisted Scotchman!" Johnson criedTo thrifty J. Macpherson;"See me -- I'm ready to divideWith any worthy person."Sad Jamie: "That is very true --The boast requires no backing;And all are worthy, sir, to you,Who have what you are lacking."Anita M. Bobe

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • The phrases that men hear or repeat continually, end by becoming convictions and ossify the organs of intelligence.

    - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • I visualize things in my mind before I have to do them. It is like having a mental workshop.

    - Jack Youngblood
  • Imagination is the pontoon bridge making way for the timid feet of reason.

    - Author Unknown
  • Folks who never do any more than they are paid for, never get paid more than they do.

    - Elbert Hubbard
  • Something unknown is doing we don't know what.

    - Sir Arthur Eddington
  • Behind every successful man there are usually a lot of unsuccessful years.

    - Author Unknown
  • We sleep, but the loom of life never stops, and the pattern which was weaving when the sun went down is weaving when it comes up in the morning.

    - Henry Ward Beecher
  • A bone to the dog is not charity. Charity is the bone shared with the dog, when you are just as hungry as the dog.

    - Jack London
  • There are two main human sins from which all the others derive: impatience and indolence. It was because of impatience that they were expelled from Paradise, it is because of indolence that they do not return. Yet perhaps there is only one major sin: impatience. Because of impatience they were expelled, because of impatience they do not return.

    - Franz Kafka
  • Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.

    - Mark Twain
  • As a twig is bent the tree inclines.

    - Virgil
  • Good habits are formed; bad habits we fall into.

    - Author Unknown
  • Love is the triumph of imagination over intelligence.

    - H. L. Mencken
  • Approach each new problem not with a view of finding what you hope will be there, but to get the truth, the realities that must be grappled with. You may not like what you find. In that case you are entitled to try to change it. But do not deceive yourself as to what you do find to be the facts of the situation.

    - Bernard M. Baruch
  • It is not a lucky word, this name "impossible"; no good comes of those who have it so often in their mouths.

    - Thomas Carlyle
  • The rule is perfect: in all matters of opinion our adversaries are insane.

    - Mark Twain
  • You can never have a revolution in order to establish a democracy. You must have a democracy in order to have a revolution

    - G. K. Chesterton
  • DANCE, v.i. To leap about to the sound of tittering music, preferably with arms about your neighbor's wife or daughter. There are many kinds of dances, but all those requiring the participation of the two sexes have two characteristics in common: they are conspicuously innocent, and warmly loved by the vicious.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • You cannot keep a man down without staying down with him.

    - Steve Biko
  • Whoever does not love his work cannot hope that it will please others.

    - Unknown
  • What did my hands do before they held you?

    - Sylvia Plath
  • A slave begins by demanding justice and ends by wanting to wear a crown.

    - Albert Camus
  • It is said that if Noah's ark had had to be built by a company; they would not have laid the keel yet; and it may be so. What is many men's business is nobody's business. The greatest things are accomplished by individual men.

    - Charles Haddon Spurgeon
  • No one goes there nowadays, it's too crowded.

    - Yogi Berra
  • The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been found.

    - Calvin Trillin
  • To err is dysfunctional, to forgive co-dependent.

    - Berton Averre
  • Until and unless you discover that money is the root of all good, you ask for your own destruction. When money ceases to become the means by which men deal with one another, then men become the tools of other men. Blood, whips and guns--or dollars. Take your choice--there is no other.

    - Ayn Rand
  • Great artists have no country.

    - Alfred Du Masset
  • If you have no confidence in self, you are twice defeated in the race of life. With confidence, you have won even before you have started.

    - Marcus Garvey
  • At least two-thirds of our miseries spring from human stupidity, human malice and those great motivators and justifiers of malice and stupidity: idealism, dogmatism and proselytizing zeal on behalf of religous or political ideas.

    - Aldous Huxley
  • The joy of discovery is certainly the liveliest that the mind of man can ever feel.

    - Claude Bernard
  • Perpetual worry will get you to one place ahead of time - the cemetery.

    - Author Unknown
  • A smiling face is half the meal.

    - Latvian Proverb
  • God has so made the mind of man that a peculiar deliciousness resides in the fruits of personal industry.

    - Wilberforce
  • One must not lose desires. They are mighty stimulants to creativeness, to love, and to long life.

    - Alexander A. Bogomoletz
  • We are indeed much more than what we eat, but what we eat can nevertheless help us to be much more than what we are.

    - Adelle Davis
  • I ask you to look both ways. For the road to a knowledge of the stars leads through the atom; and important knowledge of the atom has been reached through the stars.

    - Sir Arthur Eddington
  • Nobody cares if you can't dance well. Just get up and dance.

    - Dave Barry
  • DANGER, n.A savage beast which, when it sleeps,Man girds at and despises,But takes himself away by leapsAnd bounds when it arises.Ambat Delaso

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • What is grace? It is the inspiration from on high: it is love; it is liberty. Grace is the spirit of law. This discovery of the spirit of law belongs to Saint Paul; and what he calls "grace" from a heavenly point of view, we, from an earthly point, call "rigtheousness."

    - Victor Hugo
  • Be warned against all 'good' advice because 'good' advice is necessarily 'safe' advice, and though it will undoubtedly follow a sane pattern, it will very likely lead one into total sterility--one of the crushing problems of our time.

    - Jules Feiffer
  • The uncompromising attitude is more indicative of an inner uncertainty than a deep conviction. The implacable stand is directed more against the doubt within than the assailant without.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • Cheese - milk's leap toward immortality.

    - Clifton Fadiman
  • DEFENCELESS, adj. Unable to attack.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • DEPENDENT, adj. Reliant upon another's generosity for the support which you are not in a position to exact from his fears.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • If you had the seeds of pestilence in your body you would not have a more active contagion that you have in your tempers, tastes, and principles. Simply to be in this world, whatever you are, is to exert an influence, compared with which mere language and persuasion are feeble.

    - Horace Bushnell
  • People unfit for freedom - who cannot do much with it - are hungry for power. The desire for freedom is an attribute of a "have" type of self. It says: leave me alone and I shall grow, learn, and realize my capacities. The desire for power is basically an attribute of a "have not" type of self.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • Self-reverence, self knowledge, self-control. These three alone lead life to sovereign power.

    - Lord Tennyson
  • He who wishes to exert a useful influence must be careful to insult nothing. Let him not be troubled by what seems absurd, but concentrate his energies to the creation of what is good. He must not demolish, but build. He must raise temples where mankind may come and partake of the purest pleasure.

    - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • Technological progress has merely provided us with more efficient means for going backwards.

    - Aldous Huxley
  • What force is more potent than love?

    - Igor Stravinsky
  • I have loved like a child collecting shells along the shore line, discarding one shell for another of seemingly more outward beauty with no knowledge of the pearls that were hidden within.

    - Robert Anthony
  • The man who acquires the ability to take full possession of his own mind may take possession of anything else to which he is justly entitled.

    - Andrew Carnegie
  • The thought manifests as the word; The word manifests as the deed; The deed develops into habit; And habit hardens into character. So watch the thought and its ways with care, And let it spring from love Born out of concern for all beings.

    - The Buddha
  • Some have half-baked ideas because their ideals are not heated up enough.

    - Author Unknown
  • Safeguard the health both of body and soul.

    - Cleobulus
  • Possession is eleven points in the law.

    - Colley Cibber
  • This is the miracle that happens every time to those who really love; the more they give, the more they possess.

    - Rainer Maria Rilke
  • Before a man can wake up and find himself famous he has to wake up and find himself.

    - Author Unknown
  • Life isn't simple. But the beauty of it is, you can always start over. It'll get easier.

    - Alacia Bessette
  • Wisdom is knowing what to do next; virtue is doing it.

    - David Starr Jordan
  • The lover knows much more about absolute good and universal beauty than any logician or theologian, unless the latter, too, be lovers in disguise.

    - George Santayana
  • However mean your life is, meet it and live it: do not shun it and call it hard names. Cultivate poverty like a garden herb, like sage. Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends. Things do not change, we change. Sell your clothes and keep your thoughts. God will see that you do want society.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • Let us hope that we are all preceded in this world by a love story.

    - Don Snyder
  • All television is children's television.

    - Richard P. Adler
  • To know a person's religion we need not listen to his profession of faith but must find his brand of intolerance.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • We cannot fail to win unless we fail to try.

    - Tom Clancy
  • Grow old along with me the best is yet to be.

    - Robert Browning
  • What a blessing it would be if we could open and shut our ears as easily as we open and shut our eyes!

    - Georg Christoph Lichtenberg
  • Calamities are of two kinds: misfortunes to ourselves, and good fortune to others.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Strain every nerve to gain your point.

    - Cicero
  • Pain is inevitable; suffering is optional.

    - Unknown
  • Writers should be read, but neither seen nor heard.

    - Daphne Du Maurier
  • The cruelest lies are often told in silence.

    - Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Old houses mended,Cost little less than new before they ’re ended.

    - Colley Cibber
  • When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's ultimate comfort.

    - Jane Austen
  • Familiarity may breed contempt in some areas of human behavior, but in the field of social ideas it is the touchstone of acceptability.

    - J. William Galbraith
  • The peaceful transfer of authority is rare in history, yet common in our country. With a simple oath, we affirm old traditions and make new beginnings.

    - George W. Bush
  • Malice sucks up the greater part of her own venom, and poisons herself.

    - Michel De Montaigne
  • Most people rust out due to lack of challenge. Few people rust out due to overuse.

    - Unknown
  • Those who educate children well are more to be honored than parents, for these only gave life, those the art of living well.

    - Aristotle
  • God is really only another artist, he made the elephant, giraffe and cat. He has no real style but keeps trying new ideas.

    - Pablo Picasso
  • People wish to be settled. It is only as far as they are unsettled that there is any hope for them.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • It has been my fate, and one's fate one accepts. It's a dreadful thing to have to say, in so wicked a world.

    - Henry James
  • There is an expiry date on blaming your parents for steering you in the wrong direction. The moment you are old enough to take the wheel, the responsibility lies with you.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • Be noble minded! Our own heart, and not other men's opinions of us, forms our true honor.

    - Johann Von Schiller
  • Where humor is concerned there are no standards - no one can say what is good or bad, although you can be sure that everyone will.

    - John Kenneth Galbraith
  • Men are not so weak as you think. They can always leave anybody or any place without a pang - if they find another person or another place they like better. If they feel pricks and scruples it is merely because they cannot make up their mind that the change will be absolutely to their advantage.

    - John Oliver Hobbes
  • Nothing changes your opinion of a friend so surely as success - yours or his.

    - Franklin P. Jones
  • No more important duty can be urged upon those who are entering the great theater of life than simple loyalty to their best convictions.

    - Edwin Hubbel Chapin
  • DISABUSE, v.t. The present your neighbor with another and better error than the one which he has deemed it advantageous to embrace.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps, for he is the only animal that is struck with the difference between what things are and what they ought to be.

    - William Hazlitt
  • In this world of change naught which comes stays and naught which goes is lost.

    - Madame Swetchine
  • Thank goodness you're a failure-- it's why I so distinguish you! Anything else to-day is too hideous. Look about you--look at the successes. Would you BE one, on your honour?

    - Henry James
  • In the absence of clearly-defined goals, we become strangely loyal to performing daily trivia until ultimately we become enslaved by it.

    - Robert Heinlein
  • Imitation is the sincerest of flattery.

    - Charles Caleb Colton
  • Jealousy would be far less torturous if we understood that love is a passion entirely unrelated to our merits.

    - Paul Eldridge
  • The pendulum of the mind alternates between sense and nonsense, not between right and wrong.

    - Carl Jung
  • Free advice is worth the price.

    - Robert Half
  • Some people are so fond of ill-luck that they run half- way to meet it.

    - Douglas Jerrold
  • Life is like one big Mardi Gras. But instead of showing your boobs, show people your brain, and if they like what they'll, you'll have more beads than you know what to do with.

    - Ellen Degeneres
  • Men are confused. They're conflicted. They want a woman who's their intellectual equal, but they're afraid of women like that. They want a woman they can dominate, but then they hate her for being weak. It's an ambivalence that goes back to a man's relationship with his mother. Source of his life, center of his universe, object of both his fear and his love.

    - Diane Frolov And Andrew Schneider
  • Let me not be understood as saying that there are no bad laws, nor that grievances may not arise for the redress of which no legal provisions have been made. I mean to say no such thing. But I do mean to say that although bad laws, if they exist, should be repealed as soon as possible, still, while they continue in force, for the sake of example they should be religiously observed.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • Good manners and good morals are sworn friends and fast allies.

    - C. A. Bartol
  • The point is to develop the childlike inclination for play and the childlike desire for recognition and to guide the child over to important fields for society. Such a school demands from the teacher that he be a kind of artist in his province.

    - Albert Einstein
  • Life is just a mirror, and what you see out there, you must first see inside of you.

    - Wally 'Famous' Amos
  • The wisest keeps something of the vision of a child. Though he may understand a thousand things that a child could not understand, he is always a beginner, close to the original meaning of life.

    - John Macy
  • Unique among the nations, America recognized the source of our character as being godly and eternal, not being civic and temporal. And because we have understood that our source is eternal, America has been different. We have no king but Jesus.

    - John Ashcroft
  • Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. If no use is made of the labors of past ages, the world must remain always in the infancy of knowledge.

    - Cicero
  • A complex system that works is invariably found to have evolved from a simple system that works.

    - John Gaule
  • My interest is in the future because I am going to spend the rest of my life there.

    - Charles F. Kettering
  • Solitude, the safeguard of mediocrity.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • To be 70 years young is sometimes far more cheerful and hopeful than to be 40 years old.

    - Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.
  • Hatred paralyzes life; love releases it. Hatred confuses life; love harmonizes it. Hatred darkens life; love illuminates it.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Memory depends very much on the perspicuity, regularity, and order of our thoughts. Many complain of the want of memory, when the defect is in the judgment; and others, by grasping at all, retain nothing.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • A straw vote only shows which way the hot air blows.

    - O. Henry
  • Be not simply good - be good for something.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • Silence is a text easy to misread.

    - A. A. Attanasio
  • I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • A man's character is his guardian divinity.

    - Heraclitus
  • In the long run, we are all dead.

    - John Maynard Keynes
  • We must not say every mistake is a foolish one.

    - Cicero
  • For aught that I could ever read,Could ever hear by tale or history,The course of true love never did run smooth.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Go after a man's weakness, and never, ever, threaten unless you're going to follow through, because if you don't, the next time you won't be taken seriously.

    - Roy M. Cohn
  • The grand aim of all science is to cover the greatest number of empirical facts by logical deduction from the smallest number of hypotheses or axioms.

    - Albert Einstein
  • Our memories are card indexes consulted, and then put back in disorder by authorities whom we do not control.

    - Cyril Connolly
  • Nothing can bring you peace but yourself.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • The true spirit of delight, the exaltation, the sense of being more than Man, which is the touchstone of the highest excellence, is to be found in mathematics as surely as in poetry.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • What's the use of a good quotation if you can't change it?

    - Doctor Who
  • Gravity. It keeps you rooted to the ground. In space, there's not any gravity. You just kind of leave your feet and go floating around. Is that what being in love is like?

    - Josh Brand And John Falsey
  • 'I think therefore I am' is the statement of an intellectual who underrates toothaches.

    - Miles Kindera
  • A man is what he is, not what men say he is. His character no man can touch. His character is what he is before his God and his Judge; and only he himself can damage that. His reputations what men say he is. That can be damaged; but reputation is for time, character is for eternity

    - John Ballantine Gough
  • Gravity is a habit that is hard to shake off.

    - Terry Pratchett
  • To see a man fearless in dangers. untainted with lusts, happy in adversity, composed in a tumult, and laughing at all those things which are generally either coveted or feared, all men must acknowledge that this can be from nothing else but a beam of divinity that influences a mortal body.

    - Seneca
  • All animals except man know that the ultimate of life is to enjoy it.

    - Samuel Butler
  • Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.

    - Unknown
  • ILLUSTRIOUS, adj. Suitably placed for the shafts of malice, envy and detraction.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • IMMORAL, adj. Inexpedient. Whatever in the long run and with regard to the greater number of instances men find to be generally inexpedient comes to be considered wrong, wicked, immoral. If man's notions of right and wrong have any other basis than this of expediency; if they originated, or could have originated, in any other way; if actions have in themselves a moral character apart from, and nowise dependent on, their consequences -- then all philosophy is a lie and reason a disorder of the mind.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • EDIBLE, adj. Good to eat, and wholesome to digest, as a worm to a toad, a toad to a snake, a snake to a pig, a pig to a man, and a man to a worm.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • ECCENTRICITY, n. A method of distinction so cheap that fools employ it to accentuate their incapacity.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • ECONOMY, n. Purchasing the barrel of whiskey that you do not need for the price of the cow that you cannot afford.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Bullwinkle: You just leave that to my pal. He's the brains of the outfit.General: What does that make you?Bullwinkle: What else? An executive...

    - Jay Ward
  • No mind, however loving, could bear to see plainly into all the recess of another mind.

    - Dr. Thomas Arnold Bennett
  • If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles.

    - Doug Larson
  • So live that your memories will be part of your happiness.

    - Author Unknown
  • Old minds are like old horses; you must exercise them if you wish to keep them in working order.

    - John Adams
  • What the mass media offers is not popular art, but entertainment which is intended to be consumed like food, forgotten, and replaced by a new dish.

    - W. H. Auden
  • We can remember minutely and precisely only the things which never really happened to us.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • If you don't like your own character there may be a new one ready-made and waiting for you. The snake sheds its skin with impunity, relying on the same nature which you rely on.

    - Author Unknown
  • We are who people think we are.

    - David Foster
  • Inject a few raisins of conversation into the tasteless dough of life.

    - O. Henry
  • Barring that natural expression of villainy which we all have, the man looked honest enough.

    - Mark Twain
  • It is unbecoming for young men to utter maxims.

    - Aristotle
  • Memory tempers prosperity, mitigates adversity, control youth, and delights old age.

    - Firmianus Lactantius
  • Character is the indelible mark that determines the only true value of all people and all their work

    - Orison Swett Marden
  • You must keep sending work out; you must never let a manuscript do nothing but eat its head off in a drawer. You send that work out again and again, while you're working on another one. If you have talent, you will receive some measure of success - but only if you persist.

    - Isaac Asimov
  • The difference between the impossible and the possible lies in determination.

    - Tommy Lasorda
  • Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.

    - Carl Sagan
  • If you explore beneath shyness or party chit-chat, you can sometimes turn a dull exchange into an intriguing one. I've found this to be particularly true in the case of professors or intellectuals, who are full of fascinating information, but need encouragement before they'll divulge it.

    - Joyce Carol Oates
  • Nihilism is best done by professionals.

    - Iggy Pop
  • His mother should have thrown him away and kept the stork.

    - Mae West
  • We must not make a scarecrow of the law, setting it up to fear the birds of prey, and let it keep one shape, till custom make it their perch and not their terror.

    - William Shakespeare
  • To harken to evil conversation is the road to wickedness.. (Pravis Assuescere Sermonibus Est Via Ad Rem Ipsam)

    - Anonymous
  • A bookstore is one of the only pieces of evidence we have that people are still thinking.

    - Jerry Seinfeld
  • My home is not a place, it is people.

    - Lois Mcmaster Bujold
  • IMMORTALITY, n.A toy which people cry for,And on their knees apply for,Dispute, contend and lie for,And if allowedWould be right proudEternally to die for.G.J.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • The test of any man's character is how he takes praise.

    - Author Unknown
  • Some people make headlines while others make history.

    - Philip Elmer-Dewitt
  • Write what you like; there is no other rule.

    - O. Henry
  • When you make the finding yourself - even if you're the last person on Earth to see the light - you'll never forget it.

    - Carl Sagan
  • As a teen, you're constantly trying to figure out who you are... But it's okay not to know right now. Your whole life you're going to be growing and changing.

    - Mandy Moore
  • I don't sleep with happily married men.

    - Britt Ekland
  • To pity distress is but human; to relieve it is Godlike.

    - Horace Mann
  • All we are saying is give peace a chance.

    - John Lennon
  • That is true wisdom, to know how to alter one's mind when occasion demands it.

    - Terence
  • Confronted with the choice, the American people would choose the policeman's truncheon over the anarchist's bomb.

    - Spiro T. Agnew
  • In the future everyone will be famous for fifteen minutes.

    - Andy Warhol
  • Measure not the work until the day's out and the labor done.

    - Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  • A lot of people mistake a short memory for a clear conscience.

    - Doug Larson
  • Of all forms of tyranny the least attractive and the most vulgar is the tyranny of mere wealth, the tyranny of plutocracy.

    - Theodore Roosevelt
  • A man always has two reasons for what he does-a good one and the real one.

    - J. Pierpont Morgan
  • Life is what happens while you are making other plans.

    - John Lennon
  • People have a hard time letting go of their suffering. Out of a fear of the unknown, they prefer suffering that is familiar.

    - Thich Nhat Hanh
  • Without freedom from the past, there is no freedom at all, because the mind is never new, fresh, innocent.

    - Krishnamurti
  • A well cultivated mind is made up of all the minds of preceding ages; it is only the one single mind educated by all previous time.

    - Fontenelle
  • Variety is the soul of pleasure.

    - Aphra Behn
  • The trouble with her is that she lacks the power of conversation but not the power of speech.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • A stale mind is the devil's breadbox.

    - Mary Bly
  • Free speech is intended to protect the controversial and even outrageous word; and not just comforting platitudes too mundane to need protection.

    - General Colin Powell
  • I come from a family where gravy is considered a beverage.

    - Erma Bombeck
  • We are rich only through what we give, and poor only through what we refuse.

    - Anne-Sophie Swetchine
  • Quitting smoking is easy, I've done it thousands of times.

    - Mark Twain
  • Conspicuous consumption of valuable goods is a means of reputability to the gentleman of leisure.

    - Thorstein Veblen
  • When an idea is wanting, a word can always be found to take its place.

    - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • You may deceive all the people part of the time, and part of the people all the time, but not all the people all the time.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • IMPOSTOR n. A rival aspirant to public honors.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • This time, like all times, is a very good one, if we but know what to do with it.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • There is a boundary to men's passions when they act from feelings; but none when they are under the influence of imagination.

    - Edmund Burke
  • Of all God's creatures there is only one that cannot be made the slave of the lash. That one is the cat. If man could be crossed with cat it would improve man, but it would deteriorate the cat.

    - Mark Twain
  • Television is for appearing on - not for looking at.

    - Noel Coward
  • Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact you must give it to no one, not even an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements. Lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket--safe, dark, motionless, airless--it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. To love is to be vulnerable.

    - C. S. Lewis
  • The perfection preached in the Gospels never yet built up an empire. Every man of action has a strong dose of egotism, pride, hardness, and cunning. But all those things will be forgiven him, indeed, they will be regarded as high qualities, if he can make of them the means to achieve great ends.

    - Charles De Gaulle
  • Houston, Tranquility Base here. The eagle has landed.

    - Neil Armstrong
  • Her only flair is in her nostrils.

    - Pauline Kael
  • The best way out is always through.

    - Robert Frost
  • Why should we think upon things that are lovely? Because thinking determines life. It is a common habit to blame life upon the environment. Environment modifies life but does not govern life. The soul is stronger than its surroundings.

    - William James
  • Whether you believe you can do a thing or not, you are right.

    - Henry Ford
  • The fog comeson little cat feet.It sits lookingover harbor and cityon silent haunchesand then moves on.

    - Carl Sandburg
  • Fall seven times, stand up eight.

    - Japanese Proverb
  • The National Rifle Association says, 'Guns don't kill people. People do'. But I think the gun helps.

    - Eddie Izzard
  • In the right light, at the right time, everything is extraordinary.

    - Aaron Rose
  • Intimacy is what makes a marriage, not a ceremony, not a piece of paper from the state.

    - Kathleen Norris
  • In studying the history of the human mind one is impressed again and again by the fact that the growth of the mind is the widening of the range of consciousness, and that each step forward has been a most painful and laborious achievement. One could almost say that nothing is more hateful to man than to give up even a particle of his unconsciousness. Ask those who have tried to introduce a new idea!

    - Carl Jung
  • Nothing is really so poor and melancholy as art that is interested in itself and not in its subject.

    - George Santayana
  • When Alexander the Great visited Diogenes and asked whether he could do anything for the famed teacher, Diogenes replied: 'Only stand out of my light.' Perhaps some day we shall know how to heighten creativity. Until then, one of the best things we can do for creative men and women is to stand out of their light.

    - John W. Gardner
  • A man is the sum of his actions, of what he has done, of what he can do, nothing else.

    - Andre Malraux
  • The one thing more difficult than following a regimen is not imposing it on others.

    - Marcel Proust
  • I used to believe that marriage would diminish me, reduce my options. That you had to be someone less to live with someone else when, of course, you have to be someone more.

    - Candice Bergen
  • If the whole human race lay in one grave, the epitaph on its headstone might well be: "It seemed a good idea at the time."

    - Rebecca West
  • The man who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything.

    - E. J. Phelps
  • For too long, many nations, including my own, tolerated, even excused, oppression in the Middle East in the name of stability. Oppression became common, but stability never arrived. We must take a different approach. We must help the reformers of the Middle East as they work for freedom, and strive to build a community of peaceful, democratic nations.

    - George W. Bush
  • Confidence in nonsense is a requirement for the creative process.

    - Unknown
  • I'm just trying to look at something without blinking.

    - Toni Morrison
  • It is not growing like a treein bulk doth make man better be;Or standing long an oak, three hundred year,To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere,A lily of a dayis fairer in MayAlthough it fall and die that night,It was the plant of flower and light,In small proportions we just beauties see;And in short measures, life may perfect be.

    - Benjamin Johnson
  • ENOUGH, pro. All there is in the world if you like it.Enough is as good as a feast -- for that matterEnougher's as good as a feast for the platter.Arbely C. Strunk

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • The sole advantage of power is that you can do more good.

    - Baltasar Gracian
  • Do not bite at the bait of pleasure till you know there is no hook beneath it.

    - Thomas Jefferson
  • The shoe that fits one person pinches another; there is no recipe for living that suits all cases.

    - Carl Jung
  • In waking a tiger, use a long stick.

    - Mao Tse-Tung
  • One ought every day at least to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.

    - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • Knowledge is a comfortable and necessary retreat and shelter for us in advanced age, and if we do not plant it while young, it will give us no shade when we grow old.

    - Phillip Chesterfield
  • Give a man a fish and he has food for a day; teach him how to fish and you can get rid of him of the entire weekend.

    - Zenna Schaffer
  • ESOTERIC, adj. Very particularly abstruse and consummately occult. The ancient philosophies were of two kinds, -- _exoteric_, those that the philosophers themselves could partly understand, and _esoteric_, those that nobody could understand. It is the latter that have most profoundly affected modern thought and found greatest acceptance in our time.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Existence precedes and rules essence.

    - Jean-Paul Sartre
  • It is the simple things in life that make living worthwhile - sweet fundamental things such as love.

    - Laura Ingalls Wilder
  • It's not how much we give, but how much love we put into giving.

    - Mother Teresa
  • In all our efforts to provide "advantages" we have actually produced the busiest, most competitive, highly pressured, and over-organized generation of youngsters in our history.

    - Eda J. Le Shan
  • We started off trying to set up a small anarchist community, but people wouldn't obey the rules.

    - Alan Bennett
  • Friendships that have stood the test of time and change are surely best.

    - Joseph Parry
  • The will to do, the soul to dare.

    - Sir Walter Scott
  • Never expose yourself unnecessarily to danger; a miracle may not save you...and if it does, it will be deducted from your share of luck or merit.

    - The Talmud
  • So long as we live among men, let us cherish humanity.

    - Andre Gide
  • Wear a smile and have friends,wear a scowl and have wrinkles.

    - George Eliot
  • English was good enough for Jesus Christ and it's good enough for the children of Texas.

    - Miriam "Ma" Ferguson
  • Get up, stand upStand up for your rightsGet up, stand upDon't give up the fight.

    - Bob Marley
  • We improve ourselves by victories over ourself. There must be contests, and you must win.

    - Edward Gibbon
  • The child's true constructive energy, a dynamic power, has remained unnoticed for thousands of years. Just as men have trodden the earth, and later tilled its surface, without thought for the immense wealth hidden in its depths, so the men of our day make progress after progress in civilized life, without noticing the treasures that lie hidden in the psychic world of infancy.

    - Maria Montessori
  • The best effect of fine persons is felt after we have left their presence.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • I truly feel that there are as many ways of loving as there are people in the world and as there are days in the life of those people.

    - Mary S. Calderone
  • Having something to say is overrated.

    - Adair Lara
  • Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.

    - Aristotle
  • I must govern the clock, not be governed by it.

    - Golda Meir
  • When the rich wage war it's the poor who die.

    - Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Man's mind stretched to a new idea never goes back to its original dimensions.

    - Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.
  • It wasn't until late in life that I discovered how easy it is to say 'I don't know'.

    - W. Somerset Maugham
  • Experience shows that success is due less to ability that to zeal. The winner is he who gives himself to his work, body and soul.

    - Charles Buxton
  • If you want to say it with flowers, a single rose says : "I'm cheap!"

    - Delta Burke
  • And yesterday he would have killed me to get to his foe. But now we serve each other. Only a fool walks into the future backward.

    - Terry Goodkind
  • Jews can't serve on juries because they insist they're guilty.

    - Cathy Ladman
  • Hell is other people.

    - Jean-Paul Sartre
  • I can teach anybody how to get what they want out of life. The problem is that I can't find anybody who can tell me what they want.

    - Mark Twain
  • A hundred years for now? All new people.

    - Anne Lamott
  • The world stands aside to let anyone pass who knows where he is going.

    - David Starr Jordan
  • The training of children is a profession, where we must know how to waste time in order to save it

    - Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • The vitality of thought is in adventure. Ideas won't keep. Something must be done about them.

    - Alfred North Whitehead
  • We have, I fear, confused power with greatness.

    - Stewart L. Udall
  • Women who buy perfume and flowers for themselves because their men won't do it are called ``self basting.''

    - Adair Lara
  • Every time I paint a portrait I lose a friend.

    - John Singer Sargent
  • Health is not simply the absence of sickness.

    - Hannah Green
  • I feel how little she can like being told of her owing me anything. No woman ever enjoys such an obligation to another woman.

    - Henry James
  • I've always followed my father's advice: he told me, first to always keep my word and, second, to never insult anybody unintentionally. If I insult you, you can be goddamn sure I intend to. And, third, he told me not to go around looking for trouble.

    - John Wayne
  • Poverty is the parent of revolution and crime.

    - Aristotle
  • INSECTIVORA, n."See," cries the chorus of admiring preachers,"How Providence provides for all His creatures!""His care," the gnat said, "even the insects follows:For us He has provided wrens and swallows."Sempen Railey

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • No man's knowledge here can go beyond his experience.

    - John Locke
  • Before you beat a child, be sure yourself are not the cause of the offense.

    - Austin O'Malley
  • It is the mark of an educated mind to rest satisfied with the degree of precision which the nature of the subject admits and not to seek exactness where only an approximation is possible.

    - Aristotle
  • We turn not older with years, but newer every day.

    - Emily Dickinson
  • For the worst sign of all--as I must have it for you-- is that you can't help me. That's when a woman pities.

    - Henry James
  • There is no end to the adventures that we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open.

    - Jawaharlal Nehru
  • OK, so you've got a Ph.D. Now, don't touch anything.

    - Anonymous
  • The illegal we do immediately. The unconstitutional takes a little longer.

    - Henry Kissinger
  • When you encounter difficulties and contradictions, do not try to break them, but bend them with gentleness and time.

    - Saint Francis De Sales
  • Fortunately, psychoanalysis is not the only way to resolve inner conflicts. Life itself remains a very effective therapist.

    - Karen Horney
  • Act as if were impossible to fail.

    - Dorothea Brande
  • Some people think football is a matter of life and death. I don't like that attitude. I can assure them it is much more serious than that.

    - Bill Shankly
  • In an argument, you have to learn to control your emotions. The other person is the revolver, but you are the trigger. The revolver won't hurt you as long as the trigger isn't pulled.

    - Donald Trump
  • When I am asked, "What do you think of our audience?" I answer, "I know two kinds of audiences only--one coughing, and one not coughing."

    - Arthur Schnabel
  • OPPOSE, v. To assist with obstructions and objections.How lonely he who thinks to vexWith bandinage the Solemn Sex!Of levity, Mere Man, beware;None but the Grave deserve the Unfair.Percy P. Orminder

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • If a writer wrote merely for his time, I would have to break my pen and throw it away.

    - Victor Hugo
  • Why can't peace be a single overriding common purpose: why do we wait for a crisis to pull us together? Let's pull together for peace.

    - Rita Mae Brown
  • With time and patience the mulberry leaf becomes a silk gown.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • I tried to commit suicide by sticking my head in the oven, but there was a cake in it.

    - Lesley Boone.
  • But all art is sensual and poetry particularly so. It is directly, that is, of the senses, and since the senses do not exist without an object for their employment all art is necessarily objective. It doesn't declaim or explain, it presents.

    - William Carlos Williams
  • Talk not of wasted affection, affection never was wasted,If it enrich not the heart of another, its waters returningBack to their springs, like the rain shall fill them full of refreshment;That which the fountain sends forth returns again to the fountain.

    - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • In critical moments even the very powerful have need of the weakest.

    - Aesop
  • In war, truth is the first casualty.

    - Aeschylus
  • Man is the only creature that refuses to be what he is.

    - Albert Camus
  • It's only when you abandon your ambitions that they become possible.

    - Thomas Keneally
  • The only really happy folk are married women and single men.

    - Henry Louis Mencken
  • Marriage is a wonderful institution, but who would want to live in an institution.

    - Henry Louis Mencken
  • Really listening and suspending one's own judgment is necessary in order to understand other people on their own terms... This is a process that requires trust and builds trust.

    - Mary Field Belenky
  • OLYMPIAN, adj. Relating to a mountain in Thessaly, once inhabited by gods, now a repository of yellowing newspapers, beer bottles and mutilated sardine cans, attesting the presence of the tourist and his appetite.His name the smirking tourist scrawlsUpon Minerva's temple walls,Where thundered once Olympian Zeus,And marks his appetite's abuse.Averil Joop

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • JEALOUS, adj. Unduly concerned about the preservation of that which can be lost only if not worth keeping.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • It is said that power corrupts, but actually it’s more true that power attracts the corruptible. The sane are usually attracted by other things than power.

    - David Brin
  • The way you overcome shyness is to become so wrapped up in something that you forget to be afraid.

    - Lady Bird Johnson
  • There are some things you learn best in calm, and some in storm.

    - Willa Cather
  • The biggest adventure you can ever take is to live the life of your dreams.

    - Oprah Winfrey
  • The city is not a concrete jungle, it is a human zoo.

    - Desmond Morris
  • Photographers do this for a living, every single day -- they point their lenses toward every single corner of our world and somehow make the mundane mesmerizing through their artistic eye. It's all a matter of being aware of your surroundings and realizing that there are some really amazing and interesting things to look at, even if it may just be something so simple as a wall being covered up by paint.

    - Ward Jenkins
  • I don't have false teeth. Do you think I'd buy teeth like these?

    - Carol Burnett
  • Do you think that the things people make fools of themselves about are any less real and true than the things they behave sensibly about? They are more true: they are the only things that are true.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • 2. He who is greedy is disgraced; he who discloses his hardship will always be humiliated; he who has no control over his tongue will often have to face discomfort.

    - Imam Ali-Ibn-Abi-Talib
  • If your head is wax, don't walk in the sun.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • The lovely thing about being forty is that you can appreciate twenty-five- year-old men more.

    - Collen Mccullough
  • God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

    - Reinhold Niebuhr
  • Discretion is being able to raise your eyebrow instead of your voice.

    - Unknown
  • The basic fact about human existence is not that it is a tragedy, but that it is a bore.

    - Henry Louis Mencken
  • He who neglects to drink from the spring of experience is likely to die of thirst in the desert of ignorance.

    - Ling Po
  • Never do anything yourself that others can do for you.

    - Agatha Christie
  • A great preservative against angry and mutinous thoughts, and all impatience and quarreling, is to have some great business and interest in your mind, which, like a sponge shall suck up your attention and keep you from brooding over what displeases you.

    - Joseph Rickaby
  • Where observation is concerned, chance favors only the prepared mind.

    - Louis Pasteur
  • In the frank expression of conflicting opinions lies the greatest promise of wisdom in governmental action.

    - Louis D. Brandeis
  • Truth is something you stumble into when you think you're going someplace else.

    - Jerry Garcia
  • We grow great by dreams. All big men are dreamers. They see things in the soft haze of a spring day or in the red fire of a long winter's evening. Some of us let these great dreams die, but others nourish and protect them; nurse them through bad days till they bring them to the sunshine and light which comes always to those who sincerely hope that their dreams will come true.

    - Woodrow Wilson
  • Because the women are watching.

    - T. E. Lawrence
  • If a rich man is proud of his wealth, he should not be praised until it is known how he employs it.

    - Socrates
  • The body is an instrument, the mind its function, the witness and reward of its operation.

    - George Santayana
  • Realize that true happiness lies within you. Waste no time and effort searching for peace and contentment and joy in the world outside. Remember that there is no happiness in having or in getting, but only in giving. Reach out. Share. Smile. Hug. Happiness is a perfume you cannot pour on others without getting a few drops on yourself.

    - Og Mandino
  • Experience becomes possible because of language.

    - Noam Chomsky
  • Properly, we should read for power. Man reading should be man intensely alive. The book should be a ball of light in one's hand.

    - Ezra Pound
  • Don't let the bastards grind you down.

    - General Joseph W. Stilwell
  • There is no love sincerer than the love of food.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • ONCE, adv. Enough.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Behind every successful man is a surprised woman.

    - Maryon Pearson
  • An Englishman thinks he is moral when he is only uncomfortable.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • Babylon violated diminishes Alexander; Rome enslaved diminishes Caesar; massacred Jerusalem diminishes Titus. Tyranny follows the tyrant. Woe to the man who leaves behind a shadow that bears his form.

    - Victor Hugo
  • I finally realized that being grateful to my body was key to giving more love to myself.

    - Oprah Winfrey
  • Hell is full of musical amateurs: music is the brandy of the damned.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • With Epcot Center the Disney corporation has accomplished something I didn't think possible in today's world. They have created a land of make-believe that's worse than regular life.

    - P. J. O'Rourke
  • The only aspect of our travels that is interesting to others is disaster.

    - Martha Gellman
  • Good girls go to heaven, bad girls go everywhere.

    - Helen Gurley Brown
  • My views and feelings (are) in favor of the abolition of war--and I hope it is practicable, by improving the mind and morals of society, to lessen the disposition to war; but of its abolition I despair.

    - Thomas Jefferson
  • Peace cannot be kept by force. It can only be achieved by understanding.

    - Albert Einstein
  • If the shoe fits, it's too expensive.

    - Adrienne E. Gusoff
  • Even when a thing's already nice there mostly is some other thing that would have been nicer - or as to which we wonder if it wouldn't.

    - Henry James
  • Before I met my husband, I'd never fallen in love, though I'd stepped in it a few times.

    - Rita Rudner
  • KEEP, v.t.He willed away his whole estate,And then in death he fell asleep,Murmuring: "Well, at any rate,My name unblemished I shall keep."But when upon the tomb 'twas wroughtWhose was it? -- for the dead keep naught.Durang Gophel Arn

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Murphy's Law: "If there are two or more ways to do something, and one of those ways can result in a catastrophe, then someone will do it."

    - Edward A. Murphy Jr
  • We are each responsible for our own life - no other person is or even can be.

    - Oprah Winfrey
  • In university they don't tell you that the greater part of the law is learning to tolerate fools.

    - Doris Lessing
  • It is impossible for an Englishman to open his mouth without making some other Englishman hate or despise him.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • This Englishwoman is so refinedShe has no bosom and no behind.

    - Stevie Smith
  • She had fortunately always her appetite for news. The pure flame of the disinterested burned in her cave of treasures as a lamp in a Byzantine vault.

    - Henry James
  • Everything starts as somebody's daydream.

    - Larry Niven
  • A fashion is nothing but an induced epidemic.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • Life is hard. After all, it kills you.

    - Katharine Hepburn
  • Do what thy manhood bids thee do, from none but self expect applause; He noblest lives and noblest dies who makes and keeps his self-made laws.

    - Sir Richard Francis Burton
  • There is but one temple in the universe and that is the body of man.

    - Novalis
  • You've got to be original, because if you're like someone else, what do they need you for?

    - Bernadette Peters
  • Mistakes, obviously, show us what needs improving. Without mistakes, how would we know what we had to work on?

    - Peter Mcwilliams
  • Comedy is nothing more than tragedy deferred.

    - Pico Iyer
  • The body says what words cannot.

    - Martha Graham
  • It is well enough that the people of this nation do not understand our banking and monetary system, for if they did, I believe there would be a revolution before tomorrow morning.

    - Henry Ford
  • I don't have an English accent because this is what English sounds like when spoken properly.

    - James Carr
  • Every man over forty is a scoundrel.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • Life is like a ten-speed bike; most of us have gears we never use.

    - Charles M. Schulz
  • Long experience has taught me this about the status of mankind with regard to matters requiring thought: the less people know and understand about them, the more positively they attempt to argue concerning them, while on the other hand to know and understand a multitude of things renders men cautious in passing judgement upon anything new.

    - Galileo Galilei
  • REDUNDANT, adj. Superfluous; needless; _de trop_.The Sultan said: "There's evidence abundantTo prove this unbelieving dog redundant."To whom the Grand Vizier, with mien impressive,Replied: "His head, at least, appears excessive."Habeeb SuleimanMr. Debs is a redundant citizen.Theodore Roosevelt

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • If at first you don't succeed, why go on and make a fool of yourself?

    - Susanna Pomeory
  • I can picture in my mind a world without war, a world without hate. And I can picture us attacking that world, because they'd never expect it.

    - Jack Handey
  • Some days you're the dog, some days you're the hydrant.

    - Anonymous
  • The best time to plan a book is while you're doing the dishes.

    - Agatha Christie
  • I married the first man I ever kissed. When I tell my children that they just about throw up.

    - Barbara Bush
  • All Reformers, however strict their social conscience, live in houses just as big as they can pay for.

    - Logan Pearsall Smith
  • OTHERWISE, adv. No better.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Audacious ribald: your laughter will finish in hideous boredom before morning.

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • "Do you know what a pessimist is?" "A man who thinks everybody is as nasty as himself, and hates them for it."

    - George Bernard Shaw
  • Respect yourself and others will respect you.

    - Confucius
  • You don't get to choose how you're going to die. Or when. You can only decide how you're going to live. Now.

    - Joan Baez
  • Things are always darkest just before they go pitch black.

    - Kelly Robinson
  • Literature is strewn with the wreckage of those who have minded beyond reason the opinion of others.

    - Virginia Woolf
  • Pain (any pain--emotional, physical, mental) has a message. The information it has about our life can be remarkably specific, but it usually falls into one of two categories: "We would be more alive if we did more of this," and, "Life would be more lovely if we did less of that." Once we get the pain's message, and follow its advice, the pain goes away.

    - Peter Mcwilliams
  • How many of our daydreams would darken into nightmares if there seemed any danger of their coming true!

    - Logan Pearsall Smith
  • Before you begin a thing, remind yourself that difficulties and delays quite impossible to foresee are ahead. If you could see them clearly, naturally you could do a great deal to get rid of them but you can't. You can only see one thing clearly and that is your goal. Form a mental vision of that and cling to it through thick and thin.

    - Kathleen Norris
  • OVEREAT, v. To dine.Hail, Gastronome, Apostle of Excess,Well skilled to overeat without distress!Thy great invention, the unfatal feast,Shows Man's superiority to Beast.John Boop

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Let a good man do good deeds with the same zeal that the evil man does bad ones.

    - The Belzer Rabbi
  • The optimist thinks this is the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears it is true.

    - J. Robert Oppenheimer
  • Our main business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance but to do what lies clearly at hand.

    - Thomas Carlyle
  • There are few sorrows, however poignant, in which a good income is of no avail.

    - Logan Pearsall Smith
  • She is not perfect. You are not perfect. The question is whether or not you are perfect for each other.

    - Robin Williams
  • The time to pray is not when we are in a tight spot but just as soon as we get out of it.

    - Josh Billings
  • Success is that old ABC -- ability, breaks, and courage.

    - Charles Luckman
  • One only needs two tools in life: WD-40 to make things go, and duct tape to make them stop.

    - G. Weilacher
  • The sins of the fathers are often visited upon the sons-in-law.

    - Joan Kiser
  • Without any inhibitions of any kind I make it quite clear that Australia looks to America, free of any pangs as to our traditional links or kinship with the United Kingdom.

    - John Curtin (1885-1945)
  • Believe in yourself! Have faith in your abilities! Without a humble but reasonable confidence in your own powers you cannot be successful or happy

    - Norman Vincent Peale
  • The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function.

    - F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Life is an adventure in forgiveness.

    - Norman Cousins
  • Some people say that cats are sneaky, evil, and cruel. True, and they have many other fine qualities as well.

    - Missy Dizick
  • LAUREATE, adj. Crowned with leaves of the laurel. In England the Poet Laureate is an officer of the sovereign's court, acting as dancing skeleton at every royal feast and singing-mute at every royal funeral. Of all incumbents of that high office, Robert Southey had the most notable knack at drugging the Samson of public joy and cutting his hair to the quick; and he had an artistic color-sense which enabled him so to blacken a public grief as to give it the aspect of a national crime.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad.

    - Salvador Dali
  • The perfect man uses his mind as a mirror.It grasps nothing. It regrets nothing.It receives but does not keep.

    - Chuang-Tzu
  • The difference between false memories and true ones is the same as for jewels: it is always the false ones that look the most real, the most brilliant.

    - Salvador Dali
  • You must read, you must persevere, you must sit up nights, you must inquire, and exert the utmost power of your mind. If one way does not lead to the desired meaning, take another; if obstacles arise, then still another; until, if your strength holds out, you will find that clear which at first looked dark.

    - Giovanni Boccaccio
  • The conquest of the earth... is not a pretty thing when you look into it too much. What redeems it is the idea only... not a sentimental pretense but an idea.

    - Joseph Conrad
  • Have no fear of perfection -- you will never reach it.

    - Salvador Dali
  • To suppose, as we all suppose, that we could be rich and not behave as the rich behave, is like supposing that we could drink all day and keep absolutely sober.

    - Logan Pearsall Smith
  • It is easier to live through someone else than to become complete yourself.

    - Betty Friedan
  • The future is a hundred thousand threads, but the past is a fabric that can never be rewoven.

    - Orson Scott Card
  • There is not one female comic who was beautiful as a little girl.

    - Joan Rivers
  • Socialism is nothing but the capitalism of the lower classes.

    - Oswald Spengler
  • A fanatic is someone who redoubles his efforts when he has forgotten his aim.

    - Chuck Jones
  • When Hitler came for the Jews... I was not a Jew, therefore, I was not concerned. And when Hitler attacked the Catholics, I was not a Catholic, and therefore, I was not concerned. And when Hitler attacked the unions and the industrialists, I was not a member of the unions and I was not concerned. Then, Hitler attacked me and the Protestant church — and there was nobody left to be concerned.

    - Pastor Martin Niemoller
  • Above all, we are coming to understand that the arts incarnate the creativity of a free people. When the creative impulse cannot flourish, when it cannot freely select its methods and objects, when it is deprived of spontaneity, then society severs the root of art.

    - John Fitzgerald Kennedy
  • Remember! Things in life will not always run smoothly. Sometimes we will be rising toward the heights - then all will seem to reverse itself and start downward. The great fact to remember is that the trend of civilization itself is forever upward, that a line drawn through the middle of the peaks and the valleys of the centuries always has an upward trend.

    - Endicott Peabody
  • Imagine a world without Darwin. Imagine a world in which Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace had not transformed our understanding of living things. What... would become baffling and puzzling..., in urgent need of explanation? The answer is: practically everything about living things....

    - Helena Cronin
  • Nobody really cares if you're miserable, so you might as well be happy.

    - Cynthia Nelms
  • The only true happiness comes from squandering ourselves for a purpose.

    - William Cowper
  • His voice was a intimate as the rustle of sheets.

    - Dorothy Parker
  • If you limit your choices only to what seems possible or reasonable, you disconnect yourself from what you truly want, and all that is left is a compromise.

    - Robert Fritz
  • It takes a lot of time to be a genius, you have to sit around so much doing nothing, really doing nothing.

    - Gertrude Stein
  • Mankind's worst enemy is fear of work.

    - Author Unknown
  • Cleave to no faith when faith brings blood.

    - Arthur Miller
  • Art is one thing that can go on mattering once it has stopped hurting.

    - Elizabeth Bowen
  • All creative people should be required to leave California for three months every year.

    - Gloria Swanson
  • In this sad world of ours, sorrow comes to all... Perfect relief is not possible, except with time. You cannot now realize that you will ever feel better... And yet this is a mistake. You are sure to be happy again.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • The test of a vocation is the love of the drudgery it involves.

    - Logan Pearsall Smith
  • As long as you can savor the humorous aspect of misery and misfortune, you can overcome anything.

    - John Candy
  • I hate quotations.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • RESOLUTE, adj. Obstinate in a course that we approve.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Don't fight a battle if you don't gain anything by winning.

    - Erwin Rommel
  • The young man who has not wept is a savage,and the old man who will not laugh is a fool.

    - George Santayana
  • A full cup must be carried steadily.

    - English Proverb
  • Never trust a husband too far or a bachelor too near.

    - Helen Rowland
  • We are so vain that we even care for the opinions of those we don't care for.

    - Marie Egner Von Eschenbach
  • My music is best understood by children and animals.

    - Igor Stravinsky
  • The road to truth is long, and lined the entire way with annoying bastards.

    - Alexander Jablokov
  • There is no such thing as "fun for the whole family."

    - Jerry Seinfeld
  • Now faith is the substance of things hoped' for, the evidence of things not seen.

    - Bible
  • By heritage and by choice, the United States of America will make that stand.

    - George W. Bush
  • The more you sweat during peace, The less you bleed during war.

    - Brian Wilson
  • We want far better reasons for having children than not knowing how to prevent them.

    - Dora Russell
  • Egotism -- usually just a case of mistaken nonentity.

    - Barbara Stanwyck
  • From birth to age eighteen, a girl needs good parents.From eighteen to thirty-five, she needs good looks.From thirty-five to fifty-five, she needs a good personality.From fifty-five on, she needs good cash.

    - Sophie Tucker
  • Man can learn nothing unless he proceeds from the known to the unknown.

    - Claude Bernard
  • I know this--a man got to do what he got to do.

    - John Steinbeck
  • I like weights. You know where you stand with them. Well, sometimes you're lying under them, trying not to let them crush you, but you see, you KNOW they'd crush you if they could. There's honesty.

    - T. Campbell And Gisele Lagace
  • Prosperity is no just scale; adversity is the only balance to weigh friends.

    - Plutarch
  • Happiness is always a by-product. It is probably a matter of temperament, and for anything I know it may be glandular. But it is not something that can be demanded from life, and if you are not happy you had better stop worrying about it and see what treasures you can pluck from your own brand of unhappiness.

    - Robertson Davies
  • We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.

    - E. M. Forster
  • Silly things do cease to be silly if they are done by sensible people in an impudent way.

    - Jane Austen
  • LAW, n.Once Law was sitting on the bench,And Mercy knelt a-weeping."Clear out!" he cried, "disordered wench!Nor come before me creeping.Upon your knees if you appear,'Tis plain your have no standing here."Then Justice came. His Honor cried:"_Your_ status? -- devil seize you!""_Amica curiae,_" she replied --"Friend of the court, so please you.""Begone!" he shouted -- "there's the door --I never saw your face before!"G.J.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • REPOSE, v.i. To cease from troubling.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • To the body and mind which have been cramped by noxious work or company, nature is medicinal and restores their tone.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Why you may take the most gallant sailor, the most intrepid airman, and th most audacious soldier, put them at a table together-and what do you get? The sum of their fears.

    - Winston Spencer Churchill
  • Life is short; live it up.

    - Khrushchev
  • The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts, therefore guard accordingly; and take care that you entertain no notions unsuitable to virtue, and reasonable nature.

    - Marcus Aurelius Antoninus
  • Times of general calamity and confusion create great minds. The purest ore is produced from the hottest furnace, and the brightest thunderbolt is elicited from the darkest storms.

    - Charles Caleb Colton
  • I have flabby thighs, but fortunately my stomach covers them.

    - Joan Rivers
  • There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all apt to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere.

    - Jane Austen
  • Our business in life is not to get ahead of others, but to get ahead of ourselves -- to break our own records, to outstrip our yesterday by our today.

    - Stewart B. Johnson
  • There are only two ways by which to rise in this world, either by one's own industry or by the stupidity of others.

    - Jean De La Bruyere
  • Courage is fear that has said its prayers.

    - Dorothy Bernard
  • Will it not be felt that Virtue, however beautiful, becomes the worst of all attitudes when it is found too feeble to contend with Vice...

    - Marquis De Sade
  • Regimen is superior to medicine.

    - Voltaire
  • There are people whose watch stops at a certain hour and who remain permanently at that age.

    - Sainte-Beave
  • The weather-cock on the church spire, though made of iron, would soon be broken by the storm-wind if it... did not understand the noble art of turning to every wind.

    - Heinrich Heine
  • A country can be judged by the quality of its proverbs.

    - German Proverb
  • Love is substance; Lust, illusion. Only in the surge of passion do the two mingle in confusion.

    - Calvin Miller
  • One has a greater sense of degradation after an interview with a doctor than from any human experience.

    - Alice Jones
  • May your service of love a beautiful thing; want nothing else, fear nothing else and let love be free to become what love truly is.

    - Hadewijch Of Antwerp
  • God can be addressed, but not expressed.

    - Martin Buber
  • Drive thy business or it will drive thee.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • All governments suffer a recurring problem: Power attracts pathological personalities. It is not that power corrupts but that it is magnetic to the corruptable. Such people have a tendency to become drunk on violence, a condition to which they are quickly addicted.

    - Frank Herbert
  • Do not speak of repulsive matters at table.

    - Amy Vanderbilt
  • To save a Life in defeat, is to receive Victory and Honor.

    - The Best Of The Best (Motion Picture)
  • By health I mean the power to live a full, adult, living, breathing life in close contact with... the earth and the wonders thereof - the sea - the sun.

    - Katherine Mansfield
  • No man is responsible for his father. That was entirely his mother's affair.

    - Margaret Turnbull
  • Associate with well-mannered persons and your manners will improve. Run around with decent folk and your own decent instincts will be strengthened.

    - Stanley Walker
  • Keep a diary, and someday it'll keep you.

    - Mae West
  • I haven't a clue as to how my story will end. But that's all right. When you set out on a journey and night covers the road, you don't conclude that the road has vanished. And how else could we discover the stars?

    - Unknown
  • APOLOGIZE, v.i. To lay the foundation for a future offence.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • The youthful sparkle in Ronald Reagan's eyes is caused by his contact lenses, which he keeps highly polished.

    - Sheilah Graham
  • Ready comprehension is often a knee-jerk response and the most dangerous form of understanding. It blinks an opaque screen over your ablility to learn. The judgemental precedents of law function that way, littering your path with dead ends. Be warned. Understand nothing. All comprehension is temporary.

    - Frank Herbert
  • Arrogant and right is surely better than humble and wrong.

    - Geoff Arbuthnot
  • Don't reserve your best behavior for special occasions. You can't have two sets of manners, two social codes - one for those you admire and want to impress, another for those whom you consider unimportant. You must be the same to all people.

    - Lillian Eichler Watson
  • Not merely an absence of noise, Real Silence begins when a reasonable being withdraws from the noise in order to find peace and order in his inner sanctuary.

    - Peter Minard
  • You can always find the sun within yourself if you will only search.

    - Maxwell Maltz
  • Do not smoke without asking permission or sit so near (as in a train) that the smoke might annoy.

    - Amy Vanderbilt
  • I'm furious about the Women's Liberationists. They keep getting up on soapboxes and proclaiming that women are brighter than men. That's true, but it should be kept quiet or it ruins the whole racket.

    - Anita Loos
  • The best advisers, helpers and friends, always are not those who tell us how to act in special cases, but who give us, out of themselves, the ardent spirit and desire to act right, and leave us then, even through many blunders, to find out what our own form of right action is

    - Phillips Brooks
  • Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference. The Marines don't have that problem.

    - Ronald Reagan
  • The vote means nothing to women. We should be armed.

    - Edna O'Brien
  • True silence is the rest of the mind; it is to the spirit what sleep is to the body, nourishment and refreshment.

    - William Penn
  • RICH, adj. Holding in trust and subject to an accounting the property of the indolent, the incompetent, the unthrifty, the envious and the luckless. That is the view that prevails in the underworld, where the Brotherhood of Man finds its most logical development and candid advocacy. To denizens of the midworld the word means good and wise.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • RITE, n. A religious or semi-religious ceremony fixed by law, precept or custom, with the essential oil of sincerity carefully squeezed out of it.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Everyone has a purpose in life. Perhaps yours is watching television.

    - David Letterman
  • The moment we choose to love we begin to move towards freedom...

    - Bell Hooks
  • There exists a false aristocracy based on family name, property, and inherited wealth. But there likewise exists a true aristocracy based on intelligence, talent and virtue.

    - Tom Robbins
  • Peace won by the compromise of principles is a short-lived achievement.

    - Author Unknown
  • Liberty lies in the hearts of men and women; when it dies there, no constitution, no law, no court can save it.... While it lies there, it needs no constitution, no law, no court to save it.

    - Learned Hand
  • What sunshine is to flowers, smiles are to humanity. These are but trifles, to be sure; but, scattered along life's pathway, the good they do is inconceivable.

    - Joseph Addison
  • War is a way of shattering to pieces, or pouring into the stratosphere, or sinking in the depths of the sea, materials which might otherwise be used to make the masses too comfortable, and hence, in the long run, too intelligent.

    - George Orwell
  • Whatever is silenced will clamour to be heard, though silently.

    - Margaret Atwood
  • The love of one’s country is a splendid thing. But why should love stop at the border?

    - Pablo Casals
  • A good scare is worth more to a man than good advice.

    - Anonymous
  • The more freedom we enjoy, the greater the responsibility we bear, toward others as well as ourselves.

    - Oscar Arias Sanchez
  • He mobilized the English language and sent it into battle to steady his fellow countrymen and hearten those Europeans upon whom the long dark night of tyranny had descended.

    - Edward R. Murrow
  • I want freedom for the full expression of my personality.

    - Mahatma Gandhi
  • Now we are all sons of bitches.

    - J. Robert Oppenheimer
  • If the world gets any smaller I'll end up living next door to myself.

    - Tom Robbins
  • The problem with intelligent design theory is not that it is false but that it is not falsifiable: Not being susceptible to contradicting evidence, it is not a testable hypothesis. Hence it is not a scientific but a creedal tenet--a matter of faith, unsuited to a public school’s curriculum.

    - George F. Will
  • One of the most difficult things to contend with in a hospital is that assumption on the part of the staff that because you have lost your gall bladder you have also lost your mind.

    - Jean Kerr
  • Somewhere between the Angels and the French lies the rest of humanity.

    - Mark Twain
  • ..nor did he pause to reflect that hereditary aristocracies have always been short lived where as adoptive organizations such as the Catholic Church sometimes lasted for hundreds or thousands of years.

    - George Orwell
  • Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most People are even incapable of forming such opinions.

    - Albert Einstein
  • Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

    - Alexander Pope
  • He who can suppress a moment's anger may prevent a day of sorrow.

    - Tryon Edwards
  • BACKBITE, v.t. To speak of a man as you find him when he can't find you.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • The effect of one upright individual is incalculable.

    - Oscar Arias
  • You can judge your age by the amount of pain you feel when you come in contact with a new idea

    - Author Unknown
  • The whole is more than the sum of its parts.

    - Aristotle
  • Our ability to delude ourselves may be an important survival tool.

    - Jane Wagner
  • A graceful and honorable old age is the childhood of immortality.

    - Pindar
  • History is a vision of God’s creation on the move.

    - Arnold Toynbee
  • Some people think only intellect counts: knowing how to solve problems, knowing how to get by, knowing how to identify an advantage and seize it. But the functions of intellect are insufficient without courage, love, friendship, compassion and empathy.

    - Dean Koontz
  • The problem is never how to get new, innovative thoughts into your mind, but how to get old ones out. Every mind is a building filled with archaic furniture. Clean out a corner of your mind and creativity will instantly fill it.

    - Dee W. Hock
  • If you can give your son or daughter only one gift, let it be Enthusiasm.

    - Bruce Barton
  • To Thales the primary question was not what do we know, but how do we know it.

    - Aristotle
  • AVERNUS, n. The lake by which the ancients entered the infernal regions. The fact that access to the infernal regions was obtained by a lake is believed by the learned Marcus Ansello Scrutator to have suggested the Christian rite of baptism by immersion. This, however, has been shown by Lactantius to be an error._Facilis descensus Averni,_The poet remarks; and the senseOf it is that when down-hill I turn IWill get more of punches than pence.Jehal Dai Lupe

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • We make war that we may live in peace.

    - Aristotle
  • RITUALISM, n. A Dutch Garden of God where He may walk in rectilinear freedom, keeping off the grass.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • RUBBISH, n. Worthless matter, such as the religions, philosophies, literatures, arts and sciences of the tribes infesting the regions lying due south from Boreaplas.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • BARRACK, n. A house in which soldiers enjoy a portion of that of which it is their business to deprive others.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • SACRED, adj. Dedicated to some religious purpose; having a divine character; inspiring solemn thoughts or emotions; as, the Dalai Lama of Thibet; the Moogum of M'bwango; the temple of Apes in Ceylon; the Cow in India; the Crocodile, the Cat and the Onion of ancient Egypt; the Mufti of Moosh; the hair of the dog that bit Noah, etc.All things are either sacred or profane.The former to ecclesiasts bring gain;The latter to the devil appertain.Dumbo Omohundro

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Judgement, not passion should prevail.

    - Epicharmus
  • Happiness lies, first of all, in health.

    - George William Curtis
  • Only those who have the patience to do simple things perfectly ever acquire the skill to do difficult things easily.

    - Author Unknown
  • Our friends should be companions who inspire us, who help us rise to our best.

    - Joseph B. Wirthlin
  • Everybody likes to go their own way--to choose their own time and manner of devotion.

    - Jane Austen
  • No amount of time can erase the memory of a good cat and no amount of masking tape can ever totally remove his fur from your couch.

    - Leo Buscaglia
  • Never look down to test the ground before taking your next step; only he who keeps his eye fixed on the far horizon will find the right road.

    - Dag Hammarskjold
  • Like an unchecked cancer, hate corrodes the personality and eats away its vital unity. Hate destroys a man's sense of values and his objectivity. It causes him to describe the beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful, and to confuse the true with the false and the false with the true.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • The only factor becoming scarce in a world of abundance is human attention.

    - Kevin Kelly
  • Don't believe anything you read on the net. Except this. Well, including this, I suppose.

    - Douglas Adams
  • Cyberspace is - or can be - a good, friendly and egalitarian place to meet.

    - Douglas Adams
  • We could call order by the name of God, but it would be an impersonal God. There's not much personal about the laws of physics.

    - Stephen Hawking
  • Horse, you are truly a creature without equal, for you fly without wings and conquer without sword.

    - Koran
  • Everywhere I go I'm asked if I think the university stifles writers. My opinion is that they don't stifle enough of them. There's many a best-seller that could have been prevented by a good teacher.

    - Flannery O'Connor
  • A patient man is one who can put up with himself.

    - Author Unknown
  • Champions aren't made in gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them: A desire, a dream, a vision. They have to have last-minute stamina, they have to be a little faster, they have to have the skill and the will. But the will must be stronger than the skill.

    - Muhammad Ali
  • Perhaps when we find ourselves wanting everything, it is because we are dangerously close to wanting nothing.

    - Sylvia Plath
  • A kindOf excellent dumb discourse.

    - William Shakespeare
  • We shouldn't be surprised that conditions in the universe are suitable for life, but this is not evidence that the universe was designed to allow for life.

    - Stephen Hawking
  • It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.

    - Jane Austen
  • I fear not, I see not reason for fear. In the end we will be the victors. For though at times the flame of liberty may cease to shine, the ember will never expire.

    - Thomas Paine
  • The test of courage comes when we are in the minority. The test of tolerance comes when we are in the majority.

    - Ralph W. Sockman
  • All is ephemeral--fame and the famous as well.

    - Marcus Aurelius
  • Religions change; beer and wine remain.

    - Harvey Allen
  • In England there are sixty different religions and only one sauce.

    - Francesco Caracciolo
  • Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence.

    - Robert Frost
  • SAINT, n. A dead sinner revised and edited.The Duchess of Orleans relates that the irreverent old calumniator, Marshal Villeroi, who in his youth had known St. Francis de Sales, said, on hearing him called saint: "I am delighted to hear that Monsieur de Sales is a saint. He was fond of saying indelicate things, and used to cheat at cards. In other respects he was a perfect gentleman, though a fool."

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • After the greatest clouds, the sun.

    - Alan Of Lille
  • There are two possible outcomes: If the result confirms the hypothesis, then you've made a measurement. If the result is contrary to the hypothesis, then you've made a discovery.

    - Enrico Fermi
  • Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited love.

    - Charles M. Schulz
  • Leave it to a girl to take the fun out of sex discrimination.

    - Bill Watterson
  • Never, never, never believe any war will be smooth and easy, or that anyone who embarks on the strange voyage can measure the tides and hurricanes he will encounter. The statesman who yields to war fever must realize that once the signal is given, he is no longer the master of policy but the slave of unforeseeable and uncontrollable events.

    - Sir Winston Churchill
  • The best answer to answer to anger is silence.

    - Author Unknown
  • He who carries out one good deed acquires one advocate in his own behalf, and he who commits one transgression acquires one accuser against himself. Repentance and good works are like a shield against calamity.

    - The Talmud
  • It is only a poor sort of happiness that could ever come by caring very much about our own pleasures. We can only have the highest happiness such as goes along with being a great man, by having wide thoughts and much feeling for the rest of the world as well as ourselves.

    - George Eliot
  • Meet the sunrise with confidence.

    - Alonzo Newton Benn
  • BEFRIEND, v.t. To make an ingrate.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • The place to improve the world is first in one's own heart and head and hands.

    - Robert M. Pirsig
  • More than an end to war, we want an end to the beginnings of all wars.

    - Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • Where any one body of educated men, of whatever denomination, are condemned indiscriminately, there must be a deficiency of information, or...of something else.

    - Jane Austen
  • (Kenneth) Star...(has) done what I could not do in a quarter century: make pornography more widely available.

    - Larry Flint
  • If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thru' chinks of his cavern.

    - Blake
  • Begin doing what you want to do now. We are not living in eternity. We have only this moment, sparkling like a star in our hand ­ and melting like a snowflake. Let us use it before it is too late.

    - Marie Beyon Ray
  • There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.

    - William Shakespeare
  • The man who stops making new friends eventually will have none.

    - James Boswell
  • Peace may cost as much as war, but it is a better buy.

    - Author Unknown
  • Violence is unnecessary and costly. Peace is the only way.

    - Julius K. Nyerere
  • He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city.

    - Bible
  • The average Ph.D. thesis is nothing but a transference of bones from one graveyard to another.

    - J. Frank Dobie
  • When a man is wrong and won't admit is, he always gets angry.

    - Thomas C. Haliburton
  • For there is no question but a just fear of an imminent danger, though there be no blow given, is a lawful cause of war.

    - Sir Francis Bacon
  • Though this be madness, yet there is method in 't.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Peace is the happy, natural state of man; war corruption, his disgrace.

    - Tom Masson
  • Oh! Do not attack me with your watch. A watch is always too fast or too slow. I cannot be dictated to by a watch.

    - Jane Austen
  • Faults are soon copied.

    - Horace
  • We choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy - but because they are hard! Because that challenge is one we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone and one we intend to win!

    - John F. Kennedy
  • All war is a symptom of man's failure as a thinking animal.

    - John Steinbeck
  • BOTTLE-NOSED, adj. Having a nose created in the image of its maker.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • BODY-SNATCHER, n. A robber of grave-worms. One who supplies the young physicians with that with which the old physicians have supplied the undertaker. The hyena."One night," a doctor said, "last fall,I and my comrades, four in all,When visiting a graveyard stoodWithin the shadow of a wall."While waiting for the moon to sinkWe saw a wild hyena slinkAbout a new-made grave, and thenBegin to excavate its brink!"Shocked by the horrid act, we madeA sally from our ambuscade,And, falling on the unholy beast,Dispatched him with a pick and spade."Bettel K. Jhones

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • SCARABAEUS, n. The sacred beetle of the ancient Egyptians, allied to our familiar "tumble-bug." It was supposed to symbolize immortality, the fact that God knew why giving it its peculiar sanctity. Its habit of incubating its eggs in a ball of ordure may also have commended it to the favor of the priesthood, and may some day assure it an equal reverence among ourselves. True, the American beetle is an inferior beetle, but the American priest is an inferior priest.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • BONDSMAN, n. A fool who, having property of his own, undertakes to become responsible for that entrusted to another to a third. Philippe of Orleans wishing to appoint one of his favorites, a dissolute nobleman, to a high office, asked him what security he would be able to give. "I need no bondsmen," he replied, "for I can give you my word of honor." "And pray what may be the value of that?" inquired the amused Regent. "Monsieur, it is worth its weight in gold."

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.

    - Hunter S. Thompson
  • This is the very perfection of a man, to find out his own imperfection.

    - Saint Augustine
  • O, woe is me,To have seen what I have seen, see what I see!

    - William Shakespeare
  • The greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something and tell what it saw in a plain way. Hundreds of people can talk for one who can think, but thousands can think for one who can see. To see clearly is poetry, prophecy and religion, all in one.

    - John Ruskin
  • O, my offence is rank, it smells to heaven;It hath the primal eldest curse upon 't,A brother's murder.

    - William Shakespeare
  • It is a barren kind of criticism which tells you what a thing is not.

    - R. W. Griswold
  • Fear secretes acids; but love and trust are sweet juices.

    - Henry Ward Beecher
  • Sure, he that made us with such large discourse, looking before and after, gave us not that capability and god-like reason to fust in us unus'd.

    - William Shakespeare
  • There are no frontiers in this struggle to the death... A victory for any country against imperialism is our victory, just as any country's defeat is a defeat for all.

    - Ernesto Che Guevara
  • Awake, arise, or be forever fall'n.

    - John Milton
  • We are not human beings on a spiritual journey. We are spiritual beings on a human journey.

    - Stephen Covey
  • The man who gives up accomplishes nothing and is only a hindrance. The man who does not give up can move mountains.

    - Ernest Hello
  • Men's arguments often prove nothing but their wishes.

    - C. C. Colton
  • Fortunate indeed, is the man who takes exactly the right measure of himself, and holds a just balance between what he can acquire and what he can use.

    - Peter Mere Latham
  • Hay is more acceptable to an ass than gold.

    - Latin Proverb
  • We must always tell what we see. Above all, and this is more difficult, we must always see what we see.

    - Charles Peguy
  • Stupidity has a certain charm - ignorance does not.

    - Frank Zappa
  • It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped. Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.

    - Robert F. Kennedy
  • The lady doth protest too much, methinks.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Our passions are like convulsion fits, which, though they make us stronger for a time, leave us the weaker ever after.

    - Alexander Pope
  • Better to reign in Hell than serve in Heaven.

    - John Milton
  • The mind is its own place and in itself can make a heaven of Hell and a hell of Heaven

    - John Milton
  • The idea of selling out is not so much a dollar amount, but are you sacrificing the service to the customers. You have to ask yourself, 'Are you betraying your users?'

    - Jesse Sanchez
  • Every man who observes vigilantly, and resolves steadfastly, grows unconsciously into genius.

    - Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • Men always talk about the most important things to perfect strangers. In the perfect stranger we perceive man himself; the image of a God is not disguised by resemblances to an uncle or doubts of wisdom of a mustache.

    - G. K. Chesterton
  • SELFISH, adj. Devoid of consideration for the selfishness of others.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • BRUTE, n. See HUSBAND.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • CALUMNUS, n. A graduate of the School for Scandal.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • SIREN, n. One of several musical prodigies famous for a vain attempt to dissuade Odysseus from a life on the ocean wave. Figuratively, any lady of splendid promise, dissembled purpose and disappointing performance.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • CAMEL, n. A quadruped (the _Splaypes humpidorsus_) of great value to the show business. There are two kinds of camels -- the camel proper and the camel improper. It is the latter that is always exhibited.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now; your gambols, your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar? Not one now, to mock your own grinning? Quite chap-fallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favour she must come.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Some families can trace their ancestors back three hundred years, but can't tell you where their children were last night.

    - Author Unknown
  • Nothing improves the memory more than trying to forget.

    - Author Unknown
  • Its embarrassing, you try to overthrow the government and you wind up on a Best Sellers List.

    - Abbie Hoffman
  • The revolution is not a tea party.

    - Mao Tse-Tung
  • Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy.

    - Dale Carnegie
  • In all things there are three choices: Yes, No & no choice, except in this -- I either choose the truth or I am deceit.

    - Sovereign
  • It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets.

    - Voltaire
  • An affirmation is a strong, positive statement that something is already so.

    - Shakti Gawain
  • Affirmations are like prescriptions for certain aspects of yourself you want to change.

    - Jerry Frankhauser
  • Ask not what you can do for your country, ask what your country did to you.

    - Kmfdm
  • Although the last, not least.

    - William Shakespeare
  • He that blows the coals in quarrels that he has nothing to do with, has no right to complain if the sparks fly in his face.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • I can win an argument on any topic, against any opponent. People know this, and steer clear of me at parties. Often, as a sign of their great respect, they don't even invite me.

    - Dave Barry
  • Stupidity cannot be cured with money, or through education, or by legislation. Stupidity is not a sin, the victim can't help being stupid. But stupidity is the only universal capital crime: the sentence is death, there is no appeal, and execution is carried out automatically and without pity.

    - Robert Heinlein
  • The finest qualities of our nature, like the bloom on fruits, can be preserved only by the most delicate handling. Yet we do not treat ourselves nor one another thus tenderly.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • The rest is silence.

    - William Shakespeare
  • It is funny about life: if you refuse to accept anything but the very best you will very often get it.

    - W. Somerset Maugham
  • Now cracks a noble heart. Good night sweet prince:And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!

    - William Shakespeare
  • I'm proof against that word failure. I've seen behind it. The only failure a man ought to fear is failure of cleaving to the purpose he sees to be best.

    - George Eliot
  • A hit, a very palpable hit.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Always acknowledge a fault. This will throw those in authority off their guard and give you an opportunity to commit more.

    - Mark Twain
  • A lot of good arguments are spoiled by some fool who knows what he is talking about.

    - Author Unknown
  • SLANG, n. The grunt of the human hog (_Pignoramus intolerabilis_) with an audible memory. The speech of one who utters with his tongue what he thinks with his ear, and feels the pride of a creator in accomplishing the feat of a parrot. A means (under Providence) of setting up as a wit without a capital of sense.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • CANNIBAL, n. A gastronome of the old school who preserves the simple tastes and adheres to the natural diet of the pre-pork period.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • CANNON, n. An instrument employed in the rectification of national boundaries.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • CANONICALS, n. The motley worm by Jesters of the Court of Heaven.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • SORCERY, n. The ancient prototype and forerunner of political influence. It was, however, deemed less respectable and sometimes was punished by torture and death. Augustine Nicholas relates that a poor peasant who had been accused of sorcery was put to the torture to compel a confession. After enduring a few gentle agonies the suffering simpleton admitted his guilt, but naively asked his tormentors if it were not possible to be a sorcerer without knowing it.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • CAPITAL, n. The seat of misgovernment. That which provides the fire, the pot, the dinner, the table and the knife and fork for the anarchist; the part of the repast that himself supplies is the disgrace before meat. _Capital Punishment_, a penalty regarding the justice and expediency of which many worthy persons -- including all the assassins -- entertain grave misgivings.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • There are two kinds of people in the world, those who believe there are two kinds of people in the world and those who don't.

    - Robert Benchley
  • In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer.

    - Albert Camus
  • It is dangerous to be right when the government is wrong.

    - Voltaire
  • One's real life is often the life that one does not lead.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.

    - Jack London
  • To be stupid, selfish, and have good health are three requirements for happiness, though if stupidity is lacking, all is lost.

    - Gustave Flaubert
  • No pressure, no diamonds.

    - Mary Case
  • I am extraordinarily patient, provided I get my own way in the end.

    - Margaret Thatcher
  • How terrible it is to have wisdom when it does not benefit those who have it.

    - Sophocles
  • Pride is a spiritual Cancer: It eats up the very possibilty of love, or contentment, or even common sense.

    - C. S. Lewis
  • How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • Life only demands from you the strength you possess. Only one feat is possible - not to have run away.

    - Dag Hammarskjold
  • The fact remains that the overwhelming majority of people who have become wealthy have become so thanks to work they found profoundly absorbing. The long term study of people who eventually became wealthy clearly reveals that their "luck" arose from accidental dedication they had to an arena they enjoyed.

    - Srully Blotnick
  • Everything you can imagine is real.

    - Picasso
  • To regret deeply is to live afresh.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.

    - Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • People with bad consciences always fear the judgement of children.

    - Mary Mccarthy
  • If a `religion' is defined to be a system of ideas that contains unprovable statements, then Godel taught us that mathematics is not only a religion, it is the only religion that can prove itself to be one.

    - John D. Barrow
  • People take different roads seeking fulfillment and happiness. Just because they're not on your road doesn't mean they've gotten lost.

    - H. Jackson Brown Jr.
  • You got to like your work. You have got to like what you are doing, you have got to be doing something worthwhile so you can like it - because it is worthwhile, that it makes a difference, don't you see?

    - Col. Harland Sanders
  • The poor on the borderline of starvation live purposeful lives. To be engaged in a desperate struggle for food and shelter is to be wholly free from a sense of futility.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • On the plus side, death is one of the few things that can be done just as easily lying down.

    - Woody Allen
  • Consciousness is a phase of mental life which arises in connection with the formation of new habits. When habit is formed, consciousness only interferes to spoil our performance.

    - W. R. Inge
  • No race can prosper till it learns that there is as much dignity in tilling a field as in writing a poem.

    - Booker T. Washington
  • Two roads diverged in a wood, and I -- I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.

    - Robert Frost
  • I respect every soldier, from every country, who serves beside us in the hard work of history. America is grateful, and America will not forget.

    - George W. Bush
  • The bottom line is that (a) people are never perfect, but love can be, (b) that is the one and only way that the mediocre and vile can be transformed, and (c) doing that makes it that. We waste time looking for the perfect lover, instead of creating the perfect love.

    - Tom Robbins
  • If suffer we must, let's suffer on the heights.

    - Victor Hugo
  • I was in yoga the other day. I was in full lotus position. My chakras were all aligned. My mind is cleared of all clatter and I'm looking out of my third eye and everything that I'm supposed to be doing. It's amazing what comes up, when you sit in that silence. 'Mama keeps whites bright like the sunlight, Mama's got the magic of Clorox 2.'

    - Ellen Degeneres
  • Guilt is magical.

    - James Dickey
  • Money does not change the sickness, only the symptoms.

    - John Steinbeck
  • I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts.

    - Will Rogers
  • I approach these questions unwillingly, as they are sore subjects, but no cure can be effected without touching upon and handling them.

    - Titus Livius
  • We are living the events which for centuries to come will be minutely studied by scholars who will undoubtedly describe these days as probably the most exciting and creative in the history of mankind. But preoccupied with our daily chores, our worries and personal hopes and ambitions, few of us are actually living in the present.

    - Lawrence K. Frank
  • One's dignity may be assaulted, vandalized and cruelly mocked, but cannot be taken away unless it is surrendered.

    - Michael J. Fox
  • We thought we were running away from the grown-ups, and now we are the grown-ups.

    - Margaret Atwood
  • Sinful and forbidden pleasures are like poisoned bread; they may satisfy appetite for the moment, but there is death in them at the end.

    - Tryon Edwards
  • An unfortunate thing about this world is that the good habits are much easier to give up than the bad ones.

    - W. Somerset Maugham
  • If a man does not make new acquaintances as he advances through life, he will soon find himself alone. A man should keep his friendships in constant repair.

    - Samuel Johnson
  • When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.

    - C. P. Snow
  • A good intention but fixed and resolute - bent on high and holy ends, we shall find means to them on every side and at every moment; and even obstacles and opposition will but make us "like the fabled specter-ships," which sail the fastest in the very teeth of the wind.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Democracy imposed from without is the severest form of tyranny.

    - Lloyd Biggle Jr.
  • The big secret in life is that there is no big secret. Whatever your goal, you can get there if you're willing to work.

    - Oprah Winfrey
  • Welcome every problem as an opportunity. Each moment is the great challenge, the best thing that ever happened to you . The more difficult the problem, the greater the challenge in working it out.

    - Grace Speare
  • What is right for one couple is wrong for another. I would say that there are many more important factors to a happy marriage.

    - Elizabeth Aston
  • Man without religion is the creature of circumstances.

    - Augustus Hare
  • I'm a jerk to everyone. Best way to protect yourself from lawsuits.

    - David Hoselton
  • I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see.

    - John Burrough
  • Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.

    - George Carlin
  • The government (is) extremely fond of amassing great quantities of statistics. These are raised to the nth degree, the cube roots are extracted, and the results are arranged into elaborate and impressive displays. What must be kept ever in mind, however, is that in every case, the figures are first put down by a village watchman, and he puts down anything he damn well pleases.

    - Josiah Stamp
  • I appreciate people who are civil, whether they mean it or not. I think: Be civil. Do not cherish your opinion over my feelings. There's a vanity to candor that isn't really worth it. Be kind.

    - Richard Greenberg
  • But then there's a moment like tonight, a profound and transcendent experience, the feeling as if a door has opened, and it's all because of that instrument, that incredible, magical instrument.

    - Diane Frolov And Andrew Schneider
  • The truth that many people never understand, until it is too late, is that the more you try to avoid suffering the more you suffer because smaller and more insignificant things begin to torture you in proportion to your fear of being hurt.

    - Thomas Merton
  • The greater the loyalty of a group toward the group, the greater is the motivation among the members to achieve the goals of the group, and the greater the probability that the group will achieve its goals.

    - Rensis Likert
  • I love treason but hate a traitor.

    - Julius Caesar
  • Trade-offs have been with us ever since the late unpleasantness in the Garden of Eden.

    - Thomas Sowell
  • Don't mind criticism. If it is untrue, disregard it; if unfair, keep from irritation; if it is ignorant, smile; if it is justified it is not criticism, learn from it.

    - Author Unknown
  • Rough work, iconoclasm, but the only way to get at truth.

    - Oliver Wendell Holmes
  • If you define yourself through the opinions of others you'll never be defined at all.

    - Marika Cobbold
  • You must dare to disassociate yourself from those who would delay your journey... Leave, depart, if not physically, then mentally. Go your own way, quietly, undramatically, and venture toward trueness at last.

    - Vernon Howard
  • The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,But I have promises to keep,And miles to go before I sleep,And miles to go before I sleep.

    - Robert Frost
  • Follow your passion. Stay true to yourself. Never follow someone else's path unless you're in the woods and you're lost and you see a path. By all means, you should follow that.

    - Ellen Degeneres
  • When you work with kids who have autism, they don't reciprocate any affection. You learn to find your self- worth within what you do, not what people tell you about yourself.

    - Clay Aiken
  • But as in ethics, evil is a consequence of good, so, in fact, out of joy is sorrow born.

    - Edgar Allan Poe
  • Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large numbers.

    - Homer Simpson
  • Wasting sarcasm is a sin.

    - R. Stevens
  • Dude, marriage is the 'get out of loneliness free' card in the Monopoly game of life.

    - Veronica Pare And Ferrett Steinmetz
  • The Past is to be respected and acknoledged, but not to be worshiped. It is our future in which we will find our greatness.

    - Pierre Trudeau
  • All the objects pursued by the multitude not only bring no remedy that tends to preserve our being, but even act as hinderances, causing the death not seldom of those who possess them, and always of those who are possessed by them.

    - Benedictus De Spinoza
  • It began in mystery, and it will end in mystery, but what a savage and beautiful country lies in between.

    - Diane Ackerman
  • One remembers horrors, I think, for the rest of one's life, but memories do not always remain so sharp, and with time, and new circumstance, do not affect us so powerfully.

    - Elizabeth Aston
  • I haven't spoken to my wife in years. I didn't want to interrupt her.

    - Rodney Dangerfield
  • We bear the world and we make it... There was never a great man who had not a great mother - it is hardly an exaggeration.

    - Olive Schreiner
  • All the world's a stage,And all the men and women merely players.They have their exits and their entrances;And one man in his time plays many parts...

    - William Shakespeare
  • What may this mean, that thou, dead corse, again, in complete steel revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon?

    - William Shakespeare
  • Religion is far too important a thing for atheists to leave to the religious.

    - Tor Nørretranders
  • It is probably true that business corrupts everything it touches. It corrupts politics, sports, literature, art, labor unions and so on. but business also corrupts and undermines monolithic totalitarianism. Capitalism is at its liberating best in a noncapitalist environment.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • You talk to God, you're religious. God talks to you, you're psychotic.

    - Doris Egan
  • The range of what we think and do is limited by what we fail to notice. And because we fail to notice that we fail to notice, there is little we can do to change; until we notice how failing to notice shapes our thoughts and deeds.

    - R. D. Laing
  • Her madness hath the oddest frame of sense, such a dependency of thing on thing, as e'er I heard in madness.

    - William Shakespeare
  • A room without books is like a body without a soul.

    - Cicero
  • What a beautiful, sunny morning. It makes you happy to be alive, doesn't it? We can't let the sun outshine us! We have to beam, too!

    - Takayuki Ikkaku, Arisa Hosaka And Toshihiro Kawabata
  • We who are of mature age seldom suspect how unmercifully and yet with what insight the very young judge us.

    - W. Somerset Maugham
  • A goal without a plan is just a wish.

    - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  • If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible, who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time, who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer.

    - Barack Obama
  • I was Snow White, but I drifted.

    - Mae West
  • Whenever you hear a man speak of his love for his country, it is a sign that he expects to be paid for it.

    - H. L. Mencken
  • I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library.

    - Jorge Luis Borges
  • The first question I ask myself when something doesn't seem to be beautiful is why do I think it's not beautiful. And very shortly you discover that there is no reason.

    - John Cage
  • Ingratitude is monstrous, and for the multitude to be ingrateful, were to make a monster of the multitude.

    - William Shakespeare
  • But in the end one needs more courage to live than to kill himself.

    - Albert Camus
  • A celibate clergy is an especially good idea, because it tends to suppress any hereditary propensity toward fanaticism.

    - Carl Sagan
  • It is possible that the scrupulously honest man may not grow rich so fast as the unscrupulous and dishonest one; but success will be of a truer kind, earned without fraud or injustice. And even though a man should for a time be unsuccessful, still he must be honest; better to lose all and save character. For character is itself a fortune.

    - Samuel Smiles
  • I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.

    - Frank Herbert
  • Such is the inconsistency of real love, that it is always awake to suspicion, however unreasonable; always requiring new assurances from the object of its interest.

    - Ann Radcliffe
  • I don't like to sit around and judge others as I don't like to be judged myself.

    - Britney Spears
  • The most difficult part of writing a book is not devising a plot which will captivate the reader. It's not developing characters the reader will have strong feelings for or against. It is not finding a setting which will take the reader to a place he or she as never been. It is not the research, whether in fiction or non-fiction. The most difficult task facing a writer is to find the voice in which to tell the story.

    - Randy Pausch
  • Love is a desire for that lost half of ourselves.

    - Milan Kundera
  • Unfortunately sometimes one can't do what one thinks is right without making someone else unhappy.

    - W. Somerset Maugham
  • Happiness arises in a state of peace, not of tumult.

    - Ann Radcliffe
  • The adjuration to be "normal" seems shockingly repellent to me; I see neither hope nor comfort in sinking to that low level. I think it is ignorance that makes people think of abnormality only with horror and allows them to remain undismayed at the proximity of "normal" to average and mediocre. For surely anyone who achieves anything is, essentially, abnormal.

    - Dr. Karl Menninger
  • So, let us not be blind to our differences - but let us also direct attention to our common interests and to the means by which those differences can be resolved.

    - John F. Kennedy
  • When the destroyer comes, his first act will be to destroy all the books.

    - Sir Thomas More
  • A friend will tell you she saw your old boyfriend-and he's a priest.

    - Erma Bombeck
  • A gem is not polished without rubbing, nor a man perfected without trials.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • We live in an age disturbed, confused, bewildered, afraid of its own forces, in search not merely of its road but even of its direction. There are many voices of counsel, but few voices of vision; there is much excitement and feverish activity, but little concert of thoughtful purpose. We are distressed by our own ungoverned, undirected energies and do many things, but nothing long. It is our duty to find ourselves.

    - Woodrow Wilson
  • A flatterer is a friend who is your inferior, or pretends to be so.

    - Aristotle
  • Seek first to understand, and then to be understood.

    - Stephen Covey
  • Bricks and mortar make a house, but the laughter of children makes a home.

    - Irish Proverb
  • There is…nothing to suggest that mothering cannot be shared by several people.

    - H. R. Schaffer
  • Whatever you do, do it to the purpose; do it thoroughly, not superficially. Go to the bottom of things. Any thing half done, or half known, is in my mind, neither done nor known at all. Nay, worse, for it often misleads.

    - Lord Chesterfield
  • Do not cast away an honest man for a villain's accusation.

    - William Shakespeare
  • I don't think success is harmful, as so many people say. Rather, I believe it indispensable to talent, if for nothing else than to increase the talent.

    - Jeanne Moreau
  • Be gentle to all and stern with yourself.

    - Saint Teresa Of Avila
  • Nothing anyone says in a bar is true.

    - Mark Ruffalo
  • I'm not only my spirit buy my body, and who can decide how much I, my individual self, am conditioned by the accident of my body? Would Byron have been Byron but for his club foot, or Dostoyevsky Dostoyevsky without his epilepsy?

    - W. Somerset Maugham
  • You need only claim the event of your life to make yourself yours. When you truly possess all you have been and done, which may take some time, you are fierce with reality.

    - Florida Scott-Maxwell
  • Hope, like the gleaming taper's light,Adorns and cheers our way;And still, as darker grows the night,Emits a brighter ray.

    - Oliver Goldsmith
  • Before Elvis, there was nothing.

    - John Lennon
  • Though patience be a tired mare, yet she will plod.

    - William Shakespeare
  • In the beginning there was nothing. God said, 'Let there be light!' And there was light. There was still nothing, but you could see it a whole lot better.

    - Ellen Degeneres
  • We find greatest joy, not in getting, but expressing what we are. Men do not really live for honors or for pay; their gladness is not in the taking and holding, but in the doing, the striving, the building, the living. It is a higher joy to teach than to be taught. It is good to get justice, but better to do it; fun to have things, but more to make them. The happy man is he who lives the life of love, not for the honors it may bring, but for the life itself.

    - R. J. Baughan
  • May I never miss a sunset or a rainbow because I am looking down.

    - Sara June Parker
  • A harvest of peace is produced from a seed of contentment.

    - American Proverb
  • Do you know what friendship is... it is to be brother and sister; two souls which touch without mingling, two fingers on one hand.

    - Victor Hugo
  • Imagine how boring life would be if we were all the same. My idea of a perfect world is one in which we appreciate each other's differences; one in which we are all equal but definately not the same.

    - Barbra Streisand
  • She's the only man in my cabinet.

    - David Ben Gurion, Speaking Of Golda Meir
  • Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell.

    - Edward Abbey
  • Getting old is not for sissies.

    - Bette Davis
  • Between the ideaAnd the realityBetween the motionAnd the actFalls the Shadow

    - T. S. Eliot
  • A live concert to me is exciting because of all the electricity that is generated in the crowd and on stage. It's my favorite part of the business - live concerts.

    - Elvis Presley
  • You can't deny laughter; when it comes, it plops down in your favorite chair and stays as long as it wants.

    - Stephen King
  • Even pleasure itself is a toil.

    - Manilius
  • Delusions of grandeur make me feel a lot better about myself.

    - Jane Wagner
  • An author is a fool who, not content with boring those he lives with, insists on boring future generations.

    - Charles De Montesquieu
  • Adults interfere with a natural biologic development of the child's motor, visual, mental, and artistic abilities when they try to influence the child's work in the early years. The adult's brain has accumulated much more visual and artistic memory than the child's, so there can be no true meeting of adult and child mind unless the adult knows how the child's mind functions in art.

    - Rhoda Kellog
  • Have you learned the lessons only of those who admired you, and were tender with you, and stood aside for you? Have you not learned great lessons from those who braced themselves against you, and disputed passage with you?

    - Walt Whitman
  • The more passions and desires one has, the more ways one has of being happy.

    - Charlotte-Catherine
  • A very little thief of occasion will rob you of a great deal of patience.

    - William Shakespeare
  • He who cannot forgive others breaks the bridge over which he must pass himself.

    - George Herbert
  • I'll tell you, too, that's starting to depress me about UFO's, about the fact that they cross galaxies, or wherever they come from to visit us, and always end up in places like Fife, Alabama. Maybe these are not super-intelligent beings, man.

    - Bill Hicks
  • Nothing makes a woman more beautiful than the belief that she is beautiful.

    - Sophia Loren
  • Music is the last true voice of the human spirit. It can go beyond language, beyond age, and beyond color straight to the mind and heart of all people.

    - Ben Harper
  • We don't make mistakes, we make happy accidents.

    - Bob Ross
  • When I consider the small span of my life absorbed in the eternity of all time, or the small part of space which I can touch or see engulfed by the infinite immensity of spaces that I know not and that know me not, I am frightened and astonished to see myself here instead of there... now instead of then.

    - Blaise Pascal
  • Bravery never goes out of fashion.

    - William Makepeace Thackeray
  • I like my women like I like my coffee. In a plastic cup.

    - Eddie Izzard
  • I wrote myself a check for ten million dollars for acting services rendered and dated it Thanksgiving 1995. I put it in my wallet and it deteriorated. And then, just before Thanksgiving 1995, I found out I was going to make ten million dollars for Dumb & Dumber. I put that check in the casket with my father because it was our dream together.

    - Jim Carrey
  • A lie travels farther than the truth.

    - Irish Proverb
  • Hope is definitely not the same thing as optimism. It is not the conviction that something will turn out well, but the certainty that something makes sense, regardless of how it turns out.

    - Vaclav Havel
  • Men are qualified for civil liberty in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites.

    - Edmund Burke
  • The power of hiding ourselves from one another is mercifully given, for men are wild beasts, and would devour one another but for this protection.

    - Henry Ward Beecher
  • I may be schizophrenic, but I'll always have each other.

    - Lily Tomlin
  • Feeling good about government is like looking on the bright side of any catastrophe. When you quit looking on the bright side, the catastrophe is still there.

    - P. J. O'Rourke
  • Whoever despises himself still respects himself as one who despises.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Forming characters! Whose? Our own or others? Both. And in that momentous fact lies the peril and responsibility of our existence.

    - Elihu Burritt
  • A pessimist, confronted with two bad choices, chooses both.

    - Jewish Proverb
  • Love is a secret. Lasts as long as you keep it.

    - Armin K.
  • One whose chief regard is for his own mind, and for the divinity within him and the service of its goodness, will strike no poses, utter no complaints, and crave neither for solitude nor yet for a crowd. Best of all, his life will be free from continual pursuing and avoiding.

    - Marcus Aurelius
  • Fools rush in and get the best seats.

    - Alfred E. Neuman (Probably William Gaines)
  • In America, they want you to accomplish these great feats, to pull off these David Copperfield-type stunts. You want me to be great, but you don't ever want me to say I'm great?

    - Kanye West
  • Once conform, once do what other people do because they do it, and a lethargy steals over all the finer nerves and faculties of the soul.

    - Virginia Woolf
  • Do not confine your children to your own learning, for they were born in another time.

    - Hebrew Proverb
  • One must never be eccentric. If one's lot is cast among fools, it is necessary to study folly.

    - Count Of Monte Cristo
  • The greatest tragedy in mankind's entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.

    - Arthur C. Clarke
  • In this remarkable time for the world, I refuse to believe it's time to stop believing in the possibilities of our remarkable country. I refuse to accept the downsizing of the American Dream. I refuse to bet against American entrepreneurial spirit and American ingenuity.

    - John Kerry
  • You are free, and that is why you are lost.

    - Franz Kafka
  • You don't have to signal a social conscience by looking like a frump. Lace knickers won't hasten the holocaust, you can ban the bomb in a feather boa just as well as without, and a mild interest in the length of hemlines doesn't necessarily disqualify you from reading Das Kapital and agreeing with every word.

    - Princess Elizabeth Asquith Bibesco
  • The first wealth is health.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • I gave my life to be the person I am today. Was it worth it?

    - Richard Bach
  • Every now and then I like to lean out my window, look up and smile for a satellite picture.

    - Steven Wright
  • A lot of people approach risk as if it's the enemy when it's really fortune's accomplice.

    - Sting
  • When you have to kill a man, it costs nothing to be polite.

    - Sir Winston Churchill
  • The problem most people have with resisting temptation is that they never really want to discourage it altogether.

    - Steve Martini
  • Anyone without a sense of humor is at the mercy of everyone else.

    - William Rotsler
  • O fortune, fortune! All men call thee fickle.

    - William Shakespeare
  • I am convinced that it is not the fear of death, of our lives ending that haunts our sleep so much as the fear ... that as far as the world is concerned, we might as well never have lived.

    - Rabbi Harold Kushner
  • I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.

    - Barry Goldwater
  • Nobody can feel better than the man who is completely taken in. To be intelligent may be a boon, but to be completely trusting, gulible to the point of idiocy, to surrender without reservation, is one of the supreme joys of life.

    - Henry Miller
  • By learning you will teach; by teaching you will learn.

    - Latin Proverb
  • Funny is an attitude.

    - Flip Wilson
  • Let us not forget that knowledge and skills alone cannot lead humanity to a happy and dignified life. ... I claim credit for nothing. Everything is determined, the beginning as well as the end, forces over which we have no control. It is determined for the insects as well as for the stars, Human beings, vegetables or cosmic dust, we all dance to a mysterious tune, intoned in the distance by an invisible piper.

    - Albert Einstein
  • My one aim was to do a thing well and to excel if possible.

    - Josephine Demott Robinson
  • Here are my strong reservations about the wave of computer networks. They isolate us from one another and cheapen the meaning of actual experience. They work against literacy and creativity. They undercut our schools and libraries.

    - Clifford Stoll
  • The more anger towards the past you carry in your heart, the less capable you are for loving in the present.

    - Barbara De Angelis
  • Glass, china, and reputation are easily cracked, and never well mended.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • Where did they put pictures, comic strips, and coupons before they invented the refrigerator door?

    - Jerry Scott
  • Some men look at constitutions with sanctimonious reverence, and deem them like the ark of the covenant, too sacred to be touched.

    - Thomas Jefferson
  • The artist is the confidant of nature, flowers carry on dialogues with him through the graceful bending of their stems and the harmoniously tinted nuances of their blossoms, Every flower has a cordial word which nature directs towards him.

    - Auguste Rodin
  • The thought manifests as the word;The word manifests as the deed;The deed develops into habit;And habit hardens into character;So watch the thought and its ways with care,And let it spring from loveBorn out of concern for all beings…As the shadow follows the body,As we think, so we become.

    - The Buddha
  • From the moment of birth, when the stone-age baby confronts the twentieth-century mother, the baby is subjected to these forces of violence, called love, as its mother and father have been, and their parents and their parents before them. These forces are mainly concerned with destroying most of its potentialities. This enterprise is on the whole successful.

    - R. D. Laing
  • Spend and be spent.

    - Theodore Roosevelt
  • Quiet and sincere sympathy is often the most welcome and efficient consolation to the afflicted. Said a wise man to one in deep sorrow, "I did not come to comfort you; God only can do that; but I did come to say how deeply and tenderly I feel for you in your affliction".

    - Tryon Edwards
  • It is a great thing to know our vices.

    - Cicero
  • Nobody in life gets exactly what they thought they were going to get. But if you work really hard and you’re kind, amazing things will happen.

    - Conan O'Brien
  • Anything invented before your fifteenth birthday is the order of nature. That's how it should be. Anything invented between your 15th and 35th birthday is new and exciting, and you might get a career there. Anything invented after that day, however, is against nature and should be prohibited.

    - Douglas Adams
  • If I were to try to read, much less answer, all the attacks made on me, this shop might as well be closed for any other business.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • If you want to sacrifice the admiration of many men for the criticism of one, go ahead, get married.

    - Katharine Hepburn
  • Eyes that see do not grow old.

    - Nicaraguan Proverb
  • It is difficult to produce a television documentary that is both incisive and probing when every twelve minutes one is interrupted by twelve dancing rabbits singing about toilet paper.

    - Rod Serling
  • While we don't have much say over the desires that we have, we certainly can decide which we prefer-and then search for ways to act on that basis.

    - Daniel Akst
  • Before you were conceived I wanted you. Before you were born I loved you. Before you were here an hour I would die for you. This is the miracle of life.

    - Maureen Hawkins
  • Don't ask of your friends what you yourself can do.

    - Quintus Ennius
  • He will give the devil his due.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Nobody takes a picture of something they want to forget.

    - Sy Parrish
  • Once you understand the power of stimulus control, you can use it to your advantage by changing the stimuli in your environment and avoiding undesirable ones; or, if that's not possible, by filling your consciousness with thoughts about their less tempting aspects.

    - Jonathan Haidt
  • Thinking evil is making evil.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Some of the most devastating things that happen to you will teach you the most.

    - Ellen Degeneres
  • So far as I am able to judge, nothing has been left undone, either by man or nature, to make India the most extraordinary country that the sun visits on his rounds. Nothing seems to have been forgotten, nothing overlooked.

    - Mark Twain
  • At Christmas play and make good cheer, For Christmas comes but once a year.

    - Thomas Tusser
  • The world will never have lasting peace so long as men reserve for war the finest human qualities. Peace, no less than war, requires idealism and self-sacrifice and a righteous and dynamic faith.

    - John Foster Dulles
  • Life has no other discipline to impose, if we would but realize it, than to accept life unquestioningly. Everything we shut our eyes to, everything we run away from, everything we deny, denigrate, or despise, serves to defeat us in the end. What seems nasty, painful, evil, can become a source of beauty, joy, and strength, if faced with an open mind. Every moment is a golden one for him who has the vision to recognize it as such.

    - Henry Miller
  • No man is an Island, intire of itselfe; every man is a peece of the Continent, a part of the maine...

    - John Donne
  • Wit is brushwood; judgment timber; the one gives the greatest flame, and the other yields the most durable heat; and both meeting make the best fire.

    - Overlung
  • Photography, fortunately, to me has not only been a profession but also a contact between people - to understand human nature and record, if possible, the best in each individual.

    - Nickolas Muray
  • My mother said to me, if you go into the military, you will become a general. If you go into the clergy, you will become Pope. Instead, I became an artist, and I am Piccaso.

    - Pablo Picasso
  • He who never made a mistake never made a discovery.

    - Samuel Smiles
  • The biggest thing [Frida] brought into my life was this peacefulness. I still get passionate about things, but my passion is not so scattered and it's not needy. It's a lot more powerful because it comes with this groundedness and peacefulness. That it's about the process, not about the results.

    - Salma Hayek
  • God gives to every man virtue, temper, and understanding.

    - William Cowper
  • As you teach, you learn.

    - Jewish Proverb
  • Specialization is for insects.

    - Robert Heinlein
  • When two people love each other, they don't look at each other; they look in the same direction.

    - Ginger Rogers
  • To have had fame, even very minor fame, and to have lost it, got older and maybe put on a little weight is a kind of living death.

    - David Nicholls
  • Security is when everything is settled, when nothing can happen to you; security is the denial of life.

    - Germaine Greer
  • When I hear anyone talk of culture, I reach for my revolver.

    - Hermann Göring
  • I hold before you my hand with each finger standing erect and alone, and as long as they are held thus, not one of the tasks that the hand may preform can be accomplished. I cannot lift. I cannot grasp. I cannot hold. I cannot even make an intelligible sign until my fingers organize and work together. In this we should also learn a lesson.

    - George Washington Carver
  • Nor need we be surprised that men so often embrace almost any doctrines, if they are proclaimed with a voice of absolute assurance.

    - Learned Hand
  • They blame the low income women for ruining the country because they are staying home with their children and not going out to work. They blame the middle income women for ruining the country because they go out to work and do not stay home to take care of their children.

    - Ann Richards
  • See first, think later, then test. But always see first. Otherwise you will only see what you were expecting. Most scientists forget that.

    - Douglas Adams
  • You can only perceive real beauty in a person as they get older.

    - Anouk Aimee
  • God has always been hard on the poor.

    - Jean-Paul Marat
  • The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair.

    - Douglas Adams
  • Nothing gives one person so much advantage over another as to remain always cool and unruffled under all circumstances.

    - Thomas Jefferson
  • Stupid is forever, ignorance can be fixed.

    - Don Wood
  • You don't understand anything until you learn it more than one way.

    - Marvin Minsky
  • Live simply, so that all may simply live.

    - St, Elizabeth Ann Seton (1774-1821) Foundress Of The Sisters Of Charity, Usa
  • Luck? Sure. But only after long practice and only with the ability to think under pressure.

    - Babe Didrikson
  • Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons.

    - Woody Allen
  • Scandal is great entertainment because it allows people to feel contempt, a moral emotion that gives feeling of moral superiority while asking nothing in return.

    - Jonathan Haidt
  • Behold, there ariseth a little cloud out of the sea, like a man's hand.

    - Bible
  • If people never did silly things, nothing intelligent would ever get done.

    - Ludwig Wittgenstein
  • Always render more and better service than is expected of you, no matter what your task may be.

    - Og Mandino
  • Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • This is an important announcement. This is flight 121 to Los Angeles. If your travel plans today do not include Los Angeles, now would be a perfect time to disembark.

    - Douglas Adams
  • God made man because He loves stories.

    - Elie Wiesel
  • Always win; but if you must lose, make the person in front of you break the record.

    - Steve Knight
  • Success is often the result of taking a misstep in the right direction.

    - Al Bernstein
  • It's not that I'm so smart , it's just that I stay with problems longer.

    - Albert Einstein
  • Here, you can't live as you like - in any way or circumstance. You're like a bit out of those coloured mosaics in the hall, you have to fit in your own set, fit into your own pattern, because you're put there from the first. But you don't want to be like a fixed bit of a mosaic - you want to fuse into life, and melt and mix with the rest of folk, to have some things burned out of you.

    - David H. Lawrence
  • Normal is getting dressed in clothes that you buy for work and driving through traffic in a car that you are still paying for - in order to get to the job you need to pay for the clothes and the car, and the house you leave vacant all day so you can afford to live in it.

    - Ellen Goodman
  • Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.

    - Søren Kierkegaard
  • Anybody can become angry - that is easy; but to be angry with the right person, and to the right degree, and for the right purpose, and in the right way - that is not within everybody's power and is not easy.

    - Aristotle
  • No, I'm not offended by all the dumb blonde jokes because I know I'm not dumb, and I also know I'm not blonde.

    - Dolly Parton
  • Self-esteem is something you have to earn! The only way to achieve self-esteem is to work hard. People have an obligation to live up to their potential.

    - Bette Midler
  • Beaurocracy destroys initiative.

    - Frank Herbert
  • Every day you may make progress. Every step may be fruitful. Yet there will stretch out before you an ever-lengthening, ever-ascending, ever-improving path. You know you will never get to the end of the journey. But this, so far from discouraging, only adds to the joy and glory of the climb.

    - Sir Winston Churchill
  • Many of us have heard opportunity knocking at our door, but by the time we unhooked the chain, pushed back the bolt, turned two locks, and shuts off the burglar alarm - it was gone.

    - Author Unknown
  • Sane and intelligent human beings are like all other human beings, and carefully and cautiously and diligently conceal their private real opinions from the world and give out fictitious ones in their stead for general consumption.

    - Mark Twain
  • I’ll fight when needed, revel when there’s an occasion, mourn when there is grief, and die if my time comes… but I won’t let anyone use me against my will.

    - Christopher Paolini
  • You know what it's like to wake up in the middle of the night with a vivid dream? And you know that if you don't have a pencil and pad by the bed, it will be completely gone by the next morning. Sometimes it's important to wake up and stop dreaming. When a really great dream shows up, grab it.

    - Larry Page
  • Personal happiness lies in knowing that life is not a checklist of acquisition or achievement. Your qualifications are not your life.

    - J. K. Rowling
  • Even the longest day has its end.

    - Irish Proverb
  • I got a garage door opener. It can't close. Just open.

    - Steven Wright
  • Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further; and here shall thy proud waves be stayed.

    - Bible
  • Everyone in the world is constantly fighting an internal battle. A battle between what the brain knows is right and what the heart knows it wants.

    - Oprah Winfrey
  • Hope is tomorrow's veneer over today's disappointment.

    - Evan Esar
  • The present is a rope stretched over the past. The secret to walking it is, you never look down.

    - Sean Stewart
  • In certain kinds of writing, particularly in art criticism and literary criticism, it is normal to come across long passages which are almost completely lacking in meaning.

    - George Orwell
  • The theory of evolution by cumulative natural selection is the only theory we know of that is in principle capable of explaining the existence of organized complexity.

    - Richard Dawkins
  • I mistrust all systemizers and avoid them. The will to a system is a lack of integrity.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Civilization advances by extending the number of important operations which we can perform without thinking about them.

    - Alfred North Whitehead
  • Time can burn. Time can hurt. But it can also purify. It can chase away shadows. It can melt the coldest heart.

    - Waiter
  • If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.

    - Ernest Hemingway
  • Common looking people are the best in the world: that is the reason the Lord makes so many of them.

    - Abraham Lincoln
  • In every country, we should be teaching our children the scientific method and the reasons for a Bill of Rights. With it comes a certain decency, humility and community spirit. In the demon-haunted world that we inhabit by virtue of being human, this may be all that stands between us and the enveloping darkness.

    - Carl Sagan
  • We spend our years as a tale that is told.

    - Bible
  • Gratitude is a sickness suffered by dogs."

    - Joseph Stalin
  • The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science.

    - Albert Einstein
  • You must be willing to protect yourself and what you cherish, no matter what the cost.

    - Christopher Paolini
  • Cultivate the habit of early rising. It is unwise to keep the head long on a level with the feet.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. His own good, either physical or moral, is not sufficient warrant.

    - John Stuart Mill
  • The opinions that are held with passion are always those for which no good ground exists; indeed the passion is the measure of the holders lack of rational conviction. Opinions in politics and religion are almost always held passionately.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • If money is your hope for independence you will never have it. The only real security that a man will have in this world is a reserve of knowledge, experience, and ability.

    - Henry Ford
  • Grown-ups never understand anything for themselves, and it is tiresome for children to be always and forever explaining things to them.

    - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  • Marketing is a fashionable term. The sales manager becomes a marketing vice president. But a gravedigger is still a gravedigger even when it is called a mortician - only the price of the burial goes up.

    - Peter Drucker
  • One's life is not as fixed as one believes. Surprises may lie in store for you, the unexpected often tends to happen, sometimes bringing in its train the most delightful change in one's life or circumstances.

    - Elizabeth Aston
  • A writer is a writer not because she writes well and easily, because she has amazing talent, because everything she does is golden. In my view, a writer is a writer because even when there is no hope, even when nothing you do shows any sign of promise, you keep writing anyway.

    - Junot Diaz
  • That's the thing with suicide pacts. Sometimes they only really work if they catch you by surprise.

    - Randy K. Milholland
  • A judge is a law student who marks his own examination papers.

    - H. L. Mencken
  • If you're not racking your brain to figure things out, you'll never become a scientist.

    - Nosson Scherman
  • God is in the details.

    - Mies Van Der Rohe
  • Success is meaningless if you can't sleep at night because of harsh things said, petty secrets sharpened against hard and stony regret, just waiting to be plunged into the soft underbelly of a 'friendship.'

    - Margaret Cho
  • I was working in a parking lot, which is a great place to learn the guitar. I sat in the booth and practiced all day long. And only two cars were stolen while I worked there.

    - John Flansburgh
  • The crisis of today is the joke of tomorrow.

    - H. G. Wells
  • All of us have in our veins the exact same percentage of salt in our blood that exists in the ocean, and, therefore, we have salt in our blood, in our sweat, in our tears. We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea -- whether it is to sail or to watch it -- we are going back from whence we came.

    - John F. Kennedy
  • He is most cheated who cheats himself.

    - Danish Proverb
  • Nothing in the world is permanent, and we're foolish when we ask anything to last, but surely we're still more foolish not to take delight in it while we have it. If change is of the essence of existence one would have thought it only sensible to make it the premise of our philosophy.

    - W. Somerset Maugham
  • It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.

    - Bible
  • Wisdom is what's left after we've run out of personal opinions.

    - Cullen Hightower
  • It requires more courage to suffer than to die.

    - Napoleon Bonaparte
  • My name is Legion.

    - Bible
  • The thing to remember is that that the future comes one day at a time.

    - Dean Acheson
  • The Night has a thousand eyes,And the Day but one;Yet the light of the bright world diesWith the dying sun.The mind has a thousand eyes,And the heart but one;Yet the light of a whole life diesWhen love is done.

    - Francis William Bourdillon
  • The reason death sticks so closely to life isn't biological necessity-it's envy. Life is so beautiful that death has fallen in love with it, a jealous, possessive love that grabs at what it can. But life leaps over oblivion lightly, losing only a thing or two of no importance, and gloom is just a passing shadow of a cloud.

    - Yann Martel
  • According to Democritus, truth lies at the bottom of a well, the water of which serves as a mirror in which objects may be reflected. I have heard, however, that some philosophers, in seeking for truth, to pay homage to her, have seen their own image and adored it instead.

    - Charles Richter
  • [Detractors] are just wrong, and that's okay. They just don't see it yet. That's what I would tell myself to keep those moments of doubt, only moments.

    - Lisa Kudrow
  • We shall not cease from our explorationAnd at the end of all our exploringWill be to arrive where we startedAnd know the place for the first time

    - T. S. Eliot
  • I don't believe in intuition. When you get sudden flashes of perception, it is just the brain working faster than usual. But you've been getting ready to know it for a long time, and when it comes, you feel you've known it always.

    - Katherine Anne Porter
  • Like anyone else, there are days I feel beautiful and days I don't, and when I don't, I do something about it.

    - Cheryl Tiegs
  • Archaeology is the peeping Tom of the sciences. It is the sandbox of men who care not where they are going; they merely want to know where everyone else has been.

    - Jim Bishop
  • Socialism failed because it couldn't tell the economic truth; capitalism may fail because it couldn't tell the ecological truth.

    - Lester Brown
  • Ye blind guides! which strain at a gnat, and swallow a camel.

    - Bible
  • Philanthropic people lose all sense of Humanity, it is their distinguishing characteristic.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • But all endings are also beginnings. We just don't know it at the time.

    - Mitch Albom
  • I think computer viruses should count as life. I think it says something about human nature that the only form of life we have created so far is purely destructive. We've created life in our own image.

    - Stephen Hawking
  • Rebellion against your handicaps gets you nowhere. Self-pity gets you nowhere. One must have the adventurous daring to accept oneself as a bundle of possibilities and undertake the most interesting game in the world - making the most of one's best.

    - Harry Emerson Fosdick
  • The perfect man of action, is the suicide.

    - William Carlos Williams
  • I see my body as an instrument, rather than an ornament.

    - Alanis Morissette
  • Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn.

    - John Muir
  • When a man asks himself what is meant by action he proves he is not a man of action. Action is a lack of balance. In order to act you must be somewhat insane. A reasonably sensible man is satisfied with thinking.

    - Georges Clemenceau
  • I'm youth, I'm joy, I'm a little bird that has broken out of the egg.

    - James M. Barrie
  • Our individuality is all, all, that we have. There are those who barter it for security, those who repress it for what they believe is the betterment of the whole society, but blessed in the twinkle of the morning star is the one who nurtures and rides it, in grace and love and wit, from peculiar station to peculiar station along life's bittersweet route.

    - Tom Robbins
  • There's always farther to go and more to do and mountains to climb; that's what I look forward to.

    - Jennifer Aniston
  • A Native American grandfather was talking to his grandson about how he felt. He said, "I feel as if I have two wolves fighting in my heart. One wolf is the vengeful, angry, violent one. The other wolf is the loving, compassionate one. The grandson asked him, Which wolf will win the fight in your heart? The grandfather answered, The one I feed.

    - Anonymous
  • Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?

    - Bible
  • Remember Lot's wife.

    - Bible
  • No cost is too heavy for the preservation of one's honor.

    - Mahatma Gandhi
  • Once you figure out who you are and what you love about yourself, I think it all kinda falls into place."

    - Jennifer Aniston
  • The way I see it, God put me on Earth to achieve a certain number of things. By now I'm so far behind, I'll never die.

    - Calvin
  • Hope is the nurse of misery.

    - American Proverb
  • What will a child learn sooner than a song?

    - Alexander Pope
  • The laborer is worthy of his reward.

    - Bible
  • I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.

    - Thomas Jefferson
  • I live now on borrowed time, waiting in the anteroom for the summons that will inevitably come. And then - I go on to the next thing, whatever it is. One doesn't luckily have to bother about that.

    - Agatha Christie
  • Every day that we spent not improving our products was a wasted day.

    - Joel Spolsky
  • I can't be a rose in any man's lapel.

    - Margaret Trudeau
  • Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen.

    - John Steinbeck
  • There is a lot more to life than just struggling to make money.

    - Ann Richards
  • Being able to support oneself allows one to choose a marriage out of love and not just economic dependence. It also allows one to risk that marriage.

    - Gloria Steinem
  • Anger is brittle fire that consumes and breaks whatever it engulfs.

    - Tish Grier
  • If there is another world, he lives in bliss. If there is none, he made the best of this.

    - Robert Burns
  • We don't beat the Grim Reaper by living longer, we beat the Reaper by living well and living fully, for the Reaper will come for all of us. The question is what do we do between the time we are born and the time he shows up. It's too late to do all the things that you're gonna kinda get around to.

    - Randy Pausch
  • Everybody in this life has their challenges and difficulties. That is part of our mortal test. . . . Peace comes through hope.

    - James E. Faust
  • I guess what I'm trying to say is, I don't think you can measure life in terms of years. I think longevity doesn't necessarily have anything to do with happiness. I mean happiness comes from facing challenges and going out on a limb and taking risks. If you're not willing to take a risk for something you really care about, you might as well be dead.

    - Diane Frolov And Andrew Schneider
  • I get a lot of cracks about my hair, mostly from men who don't have any.

    - Ann Richards
  • So if various trials are allotted to you, partake of life's bitter cups, but without becoming bitter.

    - Neal A. Maxwell
  • The idea of a mass audience was really an invention of the Industrial Revolution.

    - David Cronenberg
  • While grief is fresh, every attempt to divert only irritates. You must wait till it be digested, and then amusement will dissipate the remains of it.

    - Samuel Johnson
  • Many of us spend our whole lives running from feeling with the mistaken belief that you cannot bear the pain. But you have already borne the pain. What you have not done is feel all you are beyond the pain.

    - Bartholomew
  • If you do something only for money, you will never succeed at it.

    - Don Hall
  • I say to mankind, Be not curious about God. For I, who am curious about each, am not curious about God - I hear and behold God in every object, yet understand God not in the least.

    - Walt Whitman
  • Other lands have their vitality in a few, a class, but we have it in the bulk of our people.

    - Walt Whitman
  • Am I my brother's keeper?

    - Bible
  • He was burned, so he ran into the bamboo grove, but the grove caught fire.

    - Punjabi Proverb
  • For this invention of yours will produce forgetfulness in the minds of those who learn it, by causing them to neglect their memory, inasmuch as, from their confidence in writing, they will recollect by the external aid of foreign symbols, and not by the internal use of their own faculties. Your discovery, therefore, is a medicine not for memory, but for recollection-for recalling to, not for keeping in mind.

    - Plato
  • Sir, I agree to this Constitution, with all its Faults, if they are such; because I think a General Government necessary for us, and there is no Form of Government but what may be a Blessing to the People if well administered; and I believe farther that this is likely to be well administered for a Course of Years, and can only end in Despotism as other Forms have done before it, when the People shall become so corrupted as to need Despotic Government, being incapable of any other.

    - Benjamin Franklin
  • It's easier to quote poets than to read them.

    - Allison Barrows
  • I don't think you're a very good friend if you're always being supportive. You also have to add criticism.

    - Jason Kottke
  • The history of our race, and each individual's experience, are sown thick with evidence that a truth is not hard to kill and that a lie told well is immortal.

    - Mark Twain
  • When you understand that what you're telling is just a story. It isn't happening anymore. When you realize the story you're telling is just words, when you can just crumble it up and throw your past in the trashcan, then we'll figure out who you're going to be.

    - Chuck Palahniuk
  • Silly is you in a natural state, and serious is something you have to do until you can get silly again.

    - Mike Myers
  • But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age.... Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will say, This was their finest hour.

    - Sir Winston Churchill
  • If you're not happy without it, you'll never be happy with it.

    - John Candy
  • If the young only knew; if the old only could.

    - French Proverb
  • And the grasshopper shall be a burden.

    - Bible
  • The ideals which have always shone before me and filled me with the joy of living are goodness, beauty, and truth. To make a goal of comfort or happiness has never appealed to me; a system of ethics built on this basis would be sufficient only for a herd of cattle.

    - Albert Einstein
  • So many Gods, so many creedsSo many ways that wind and wind,While just the art of being kindis all this sad world needs.

    - Ella Wheeler Wilcox
  • Nothing is too wonderful to be true.

    - Michael Faraday
  • I feel like somebody just punched me in the stomach and knocked all my wind out. I'm only 30 years old and I want to have a chance to continue creating things. I know I've got at least one more great computer in me. And Apple is not going to give me a chance to do that.

    - Steve Jobs
  • In most people's vocabularies, design means veneer. It's interior decorating. It's the fabric of the curtains of the sofa. But to me, nothing could be further from the meaning of design. Design is the fundamental soul of a human-made creation that ends up expressing itself in successive outer layers of the product or service.

    - Steve Jobs
  • Golf is a good walk spoiled.

    - Mark Twain
  • Yea, though i walk through the valley of the shadow of death, i will fear no evil, for thou art with me. Thy rod and thy staff they comfort me... Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me throughout the rest of my life and i will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.

    - Bible
  • It’s such a part of me, I assume Everyone can see it.

    - Hugh Elliott
  • Insanely Great!

    - Steve Jobs
  • I have no mercy or compassion in me for a society that will crush people, and then penalize them for not being able to stand up under the weight.

    - Malcolm X
  • If it were not for hope, the heart would break.

    - Thomas Fuller
  • He who is carried on another's back does not appreciate how far off the town is.

    - African Proverb
  • Faith is, above all, openess; an act of trust in the unknown.

    - Alan Watts
  • It may make your blood boil and your mind may not be changed, but the practice of listening to opposing views is essential for effective citizenship. It is essential for our democracy.

    - President Barack Obama
  • So we must daily keep things wound: that is, we must pray when prayer seems dry as dust; we must write when we are physically tired, when our hearts are heavy, when our bodies are in pain.

    - Madeleine L'Engle
  • The coward dies a thousand deaths, the brave man...only five hundred.

    - Meredith Willson
  • I have planted, Apollos watered; but God gave the increase.

    - Bible
  • I do not want to be a doctor and live by men’s diseases, nor a minister to live by their sins, nor a lawyer and live by their quarrels. So, I don’t see that there is anything left for me but to be an author.

    - Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • The strength of the United States is not the gold at Fort Knox or the weapons of mass destruction that we have, but the sum total of the education and the character of our people.

    - Claiborne Pell
  • Cherish each hour of this day for it can never return.

    - Og Mandino
  • Neither a borrower nor a lender be;For loan oft loses both itself and friend,And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.This above all: to thine own self be true,And it must follow, as the night the day,Thou canst not then be false to any man.

    - William Shakespeare
  • We all do fade as a leaf.

    - Bible
  • Fear is a great motivator.

    - Art Bell
  • Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing ever happened.

    - Sir Winston Churchill
  • Happiness is not a destination. It is a method of life.

    - Burton Hills
  • Poetry reveals to us the loveliness of nature, brings back the freshness of youthful feelings, reviews the relish of simple pleasures, keeps unquenched the enthusiasm which warmed the springtime of our being, refines youthful love, strengthens our interest in human mature, by vivid delineations of its tenderest and softest feelings, and through the brightness of its prophetic visions, helps faith to lay hold on the future life.

    - William Ellery Channing
  • Nearly all legislation involves a weighing of public needs as against private desires; and likewise a weighing of relative social values.

    - Louis D. Brandeis
  • In physics, your solution should convince a reasonable person. In math, you have to convince a person who's trying to make trouble. Ultimately, in physics, you're hoping to convince Nature. And I've found Nature to be pretty reasonable.

    - Frank Wilczek
  • Give up your relentless moralizing, the continual pinpricks which pierce the skin of your fellows. The distinction between good and evil is the sickness of the mind. Give up your morals, and the people will regain a love of their fellows.

    - Lao Tse
  • The greatest lesson we can learn from the past. . . is that freedom is at the core of every successful nation in the world.

    - Frederick Chiluba
  • By desiring little, a poor man makes himself rich.

    - Democritus
  • We didn't think much in the air corps of a fellow who wangled a cushy job out of his C.O. by buttering him up. It was hard for me to believe that God thought much of a man who tried to wangle salvation by fulsome flattery. I should have thought the worship most pleasing to him was to do your best according to your lights.

    - W. Somerset Maugham
  • In depression you care about nothing. In sadness you care about everything.

    - Gloria Steinem
  • If only God would give me some clear sign! Like making a large deposit in my name in a Swiss bank.

    - Woody Allen
  • The only tired I was, was tired of giving in.

    - Rosa Parks
  • When I have been asked during these last weeks who caused the riots and the killing in L.A., my answer has been direct and simple: Who is to blame for the riots? The rioters are to blame. Who is to blame for the killings? The killers are to blame.

    - Dan Quayle
  • What is the end of our revolution? The tranquil enjoyment of liberty and equality; the reign of that eternal justice, the laws of which are graven, not on marble or stone, but in the hearts of men, even in the heart of the slave who has forgotten them, and in that of the tyrant who disowns them.

    - Maximilien Robespierre
  • Maturity isn't a product of growing older. It's a product of growing wiser.

    - Ann Landers
  • People frequently say that so and so died 'died doing what they loved.' I hope that when I die it's right before I was about to do something that I hated to do so I could at least avoid doing it one more time.

    - Patrick H. Edwards, Esq.
  • Let him think I am more man than I am and I will be so.

    - Ernest Hemingway
  • My first word for the New Year was "exsanguinate." This was probably not a good omen.

    - Charlaine Harris
  • I love humanity, but I hate people.

    - Edna St. Vincent Millay
  • A man does not sin by commission only, but often by omission.

    - Marcus Aurelius
  • It seems to me that man has engaged in a blind and fearful struggle out of a past he can't remember, into a future he can't forsee nor understand. And man has met and defeated every obstacle, every enemy except one. He cannot win over himself.

    - John Steinbeck
  • If you think something is boring, try doing it for two minutes. If you still think it's boring, try it for four. If you still think it's boring, try it for eight, then sixteen, then thirty-two, and so on and so forth. Soon enough you'll find that it's really not boring at all.

    - John Cage
  • When my country, into which I had just set my foot, was set on fire about my ears, it was time to stir. It was time for every man to stir.

    - Thomas Paine
  • I do not want the peace which passeth understanding, I want the understanding which bringeth peace.

    - Helen Keller
  • If youth only knew: if age only could.

    - Henri Estienne
  • I must be an optimist, because a pessimist is never disappointed.

    - Janis Joplin
  • I never guess. It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.

    - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men's blood...Make big plans, aim high in hope and work.

    - Daniel H. Burnham
  • It is not the mountain we conquer but ourselves.

    - Sir Edmund Hillary
  • I do not suffer from insanity, I enjoy every minute of it.

    - Edgar Allan Poe
  • Democrats were quick to point out that President Bush's budget creates a 1 trillion dollar deficit. The White House quickly responded with "Hey, look over there, it's Saddam Hussein."

    - Craig Kilborn
  • It is hard to have patience with people who say "There is no death" or "Death doesn't matter." There is death. And whatever is matters. And whatever happens has consequences, and it and they are irrevocable and irreversible. You might as well say that birth doesn't matter.

    - C. S. Lewis
  • He that complies against his will is of the same opinion still.

    - Samuel Butler
  • The more you find out about the world, the more opportunities there are to laugh at it.

    - Bill Nye
  • Man shall not live by bread alone.

    - Bible
  • The camera doesn't make a bit of difference. All of them can record what you are seeing. But, you have to SEE.

    - Ernst Haas
  • The ending of sorrow is the beginning of wisdom. Knowledge is always within the shadow of ignorance. Meditation is freedom from thought and a movement in the ecstasy of truth. Meditation is explosion of intelligence.

    - Krishnamurti
  • The difficulty lies, not in the new ideas, but in escaping the old ones, which ramify, for those brought up as most of us have been, into every corner of our minds.

    - John Maynard Keynes
  • Begin at the beginning and go on till you come to the end: then stop.

    - Lewis Carroll
  • I don't believe that the public knows what it wants; this is the conclusion that I have drawn from my career.

    - Charlie Chaplin
  • All that a man does outwardly is but the expression and completion of his inward thought. To work effectually, he must think clearly; to act nobly, he must think nobly. Intellectual force is a principal element of the soul's life, and should be proposed by every man as the principal end of his being.

    - William Ellery Channing
  • The most dangerous ideas are not the ones which divide people, but those on which they agree.

    - Stephen Vizinczey
  • We walk by faith, not by sight.

    - Bible
  • To design is to communicate clearly by whatever means you can control or master.

    - Milton Glaser
  • Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point.

    - C. S. Lewis
  • If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run— Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it, And—you’ll be a Man, my son!

    - Rudyard Kipling
  • When I was young, my ambition was to be one of the people who made a difference in this world. My hope still is to leave the world a little bit better for my having been here. It's a wonderful life and I love it.

    - Jim Henson
  • There's nothing like a gleam of humor to reassure you that a fellow human being is ticking inside a strange face.

    - Eva Hoffman
  • In and of itself, nothing really matters. What matters is that nothing is ever in and of itself.

    - Chuck Klosterman
  • I have found the paradox that if I love until it hurts, then there is no hurt, but only more love.

    - Mother Teresa
  • In most cases being a good boss means hiring talented people and then getting out of their way. In other cases, to get the best work out of people you may have to pretend you are not their boss and let them treat someone else like the boss, and then that whispers to you behind a fake wall and you tell them what to tell the first person. Contrary to what I believed as a little girl, being the boss almost never involves marching around, waving your arms, and chanting, " I am the boss! I am the boss!"

    - Tina Fey
  • Winning may not be everything, but losing has little to recommend it.

    - Senator Dianne Feinstein
  • My only fear of death is coming back reincarnated.

    - Tupac Shakur
  • Life is all one piece. Men err when they think they can be inhuman exploiters in their business life, and loving husbands and fathers at home. For achievement without love is a cold and tight-lipped murderer of human happiness everywhere.

    - Dr. Smiley Blanton
  • It is in fact nothing short of a miracle that the modern methods of instruction have not yet entirely strangled the holy curious of inquiry. It is a very grave mistake to think that the enjoyment of seeing and searching can be promoted by means of coercion and a sense of duty.

    - Albert Einstein
  • Kindness and compassion toward all living things is a mark of a civilized society. Conversely, cruelty, whether it is directed against human beings or against animals, is not the exclusive province of any one culture or community of people. Racism, economic deprival, dog fighting and cock fighting, bull fighting and rodeos are cut from the same fabric: violence. Only when we have become nonviolent toward all life will we have learned to live well ourselves.

    - Cesar E. Chavez
  • I hope that when I die, people say about me, 'Boy, that guy sure owed me a lot of money.'

    - Jack Handey
  • I was in for 10 hours and had 40 pints - beating my previous record by 20 minutes.

    - George Best
  • Jacta alea est.(The die is cast.)

    - Julius Caesar
  • Whatever you may be sure of, be sure of this, that you are dreadfully like other people.

    - James Russell Lowell
  • In war, there are no unwounded soldiers.

    - Jose Narosky
  • We in America do not have government by the majority. We have government by the majority who participate.

    - Thomas Jefferson
  • Let's assume that each person has an equal opportunity, not to become equal, but to become different. To realize whatever unique potential of body, mind and spirit he or she possesses.

    - John Fischer
  • When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.

    - Leonardo Da Vinci
  • I am society's child, this is how they made me, and now I'm saying what's on my mind and they dont want that. This is what you made me America.

    - Tupac Shakur
  • The shah always falls in the end, Saddam always turns on you, and the Saudis always betray you. If we support evil, the long-term price is almost always too high.

    - Lt. Col. (Ret.) Ralph Peters
  • Unfortunately, the balance of nature decrees that a super-abundance of dreams is paid for by a growing potential for nightmares.

    - Peter Ustinov
  • No man has the right to dictate what other men should perceive, create or produce, but all should be encouraged to reveal themselves, their perceptions and emotions, and to build confidence in the creative spirit.

    - Ansel Adams
  • In every fat book there is a thin book trying to get out.

    - Anonymous
  • Each person has an ideal, a hope, a dream which represents the soul. We must give to it the warmth of love, the light of understanding and the essence of encouragement.

    - Colby Dorr Dam
  • Don't mourn, Organize.

    - Joe Hill
  • In every person I see a hero waiting to be born.

    - Jon Paul Anatra
  • Life is to be lived. If you have to support yourself, you had bloody well better find some way that is going to be interesting. And you don't do that by sitting around wondering about yourself.

    - Katharine Hepburn
  • Pure by impure is not seen.

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Here at least we shall be free. . . Better to reign in Hell, than serve in Heaven.

    - John Milton
  • I love being a writer. What I can't stand is the paperwork.

    - Peter De Vries
  • But all who are not lunitics are agreed about certain things: That it is better to be alive than dead, better to be adequately fed than starved, better to be free than to be a slave. Many people desire these things only for themselves and their friends; they are quite content that their enemies should suffer. These people can be refuted by science: Mankind has become so much one family that we cannot insure our own prosperity except by insuring that of everyone else. If you wish to be happy yourself, you must resign yourself to seeing others also happy.

    - Bertrand Russell
  • I would rather not know how to write and have something to say than know how to write and have nothing to say.

    - Enrique Tessieri
  • His horror is wild, but it is a sane horror.

    - G. K. Chesterton
  • It is of interest to note that while some dolphins are reported to have learned English -- up to fifty words used in correct context -- no human being has been reported to have learned dolphinese.

    - Carl Sagan
  • You have to have funny faces and words, you can't just have words. It is a powerful thing, and I think that's why it's hard for people to imagine that women can do that, be that powerful.

    - Ellen Degeneres
  • Avoid destructive thinking. Improper negative thoughts sink people. A ship can sail around the world many, many times, but just let enough water get into the ship and it will sink. Just so with the human mind. Let enough negative thoughts or improper thoughts get into the human mind and the person sinks just like a ship.

    - Alfred A. Montapert
  • A faith is something you die for, a doctrine is something you kill for. There is all the difference in the world.

    - Tony Benn
  • To err is human, to purr is feline.

    - Robert Byrne
  • Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tries, and a touch that never hurts.

    - Charles Dickens
  • Remember that it is nothing to do your duty, that is demanded of you and is no more meritorious than to wash your hands when they are dirty; the only thing that counts is the love of duty; when love and duty are one, then grace is in you and you will enjoy a happiness which passes all understanding.

    - W. Somerset Maugham
  • I am nobody, who are you? Are you nobody, too? Then that's a pair of us!

    - Emily Dickinson
  • I wonder what fool it was that first invented kissing.

    - Jonathan Swift
  • If you want success, then don't rely on other people to do what YOU can do!

    - Sasha Azevedo
  • Use missteps as stepping stones to deeper understanding and greater achievement.

    - Susan L. Taylor
  • All faults may be forgiven of him who has perfect candor.

    - Walt Whitman
  • If fate means you to lose, give him a good fight anyhow.

    - William Mcfee
  • Tourist, Rincewind decided, meant "idiot".

    - Terry Pratchett
  • Then he saw also that it matters little what profession, whether of religion or irreligion, a man may make, provided only he follows it out with charitable inconsistency, and without insisting on it to the bitter end. It is in the uncompromisingness with which dogma is held and not in the dogma or want of dogma that the danger lies.

    - Samuel Butler
  • Relationships of trust depend on our willingness to look not only to our own interests, but also the interests of others.

    - Peter Farquharson
  • It’s utterly impossible for me to build my life on a foundation of chaos, suffering and death. I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness, I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too shall end, that peace and tranquility will return once more.

    - Anne Frank
  • Death tugs at my ear and says: "Live, I am coming."

    - Oliver Wendell Holmes
  • Do not believe that he who seeks to comfort you lives untroubled among the simple and quiet words that sometimes do you good. His life has much difficulty... Were it otherwise he would never have been able to find those words.

    - Rainer Maria Rilke
  • Whatever you may look like, marry a man your own age. As your beauty fades, so will his eyesight.

    - Phyllis Diller
  • Neither have they hearts to stay. Nor wit enough to run away.

    - Samuel Butler
  • A working relationship takes work.

    - John Hanley, Phd
  • What we should be asking is not whether we need a big government or small government, but how we can create a smarter and better government.

    - President Barack Obama
  • And, therefore, indifference is always the friend of the enemy, for it benefits the aggressor -- never its victim, whose pain is magnified when he or she feels forgotten.

    - Elie Wiesel
  • For every expert there is an equal and opposite expert.

    - Arthur C. Clarke
  • Today, the theory of evolution is an accepted fact for everyone but a fundamentalist minority, whose objections are based not on reasoning but on doctrinaire adherence to religious principles.

    - James D. Watson
  • The truly creative mind in any field is no more than this: A human creature born abnormally, inhumanely sensitive. To them... a touch is a blow, a sound is a noise, a misfortune is a tragedy, a joy is an ecstasy, a friend is a lover, a lover is a god, and failure is death.Add to this cruelly delicate organism the overpowering necessity to create, create, create -- so that without the creating of music or poetry or books or buildings or something of meaning, their very breath is cut off...They must create, must pour out creation. By some strange, unknown, inward urgency they are not really alive unless they are creating.

    - Pearl S. Buck
  • Seasons change, so do cities. People come into your life and people go, but it's comforting to know: the ones you love are always in your heart and if you're very lucky, a plane ride away.

    - Michael Patrick King
  • Christianity is called the religion of pity.

    - Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Art thou a man? thy form cries out thou art:Thy tears are womanish; thy wild acts denoteThe unreasonable fury of a beast:Unseemly woman in a seeming man!Or ill-beseeming beast in seeming both!

    - William Shakespeare
  • It was reassuring to know exactly where one stood. That one stood at the end of the line was not pertinent. At least there was a line in which to subsist.

    - Linda Berdoll
  • The secret of a good sermon is to have a good beginning and a good ending; and have the two as close together as possible.

    - George Burns
  • There are similarities between absolute power and absolute faith: a demand for absolute obedience, a readiness to attempt the impossible, a bias for simple solutionsto cut the knot rather than unravel it, the viewing of compromise as surrender. Both absolute power and absolute faith are instruments of dehumanization. Hence, absolute faith corrupts as absolutely as absolute power.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • Would you who judge of the lawfulness or unlawfulness of pleasure, take this rule; whatever weakens your reason, impairs the tenderness of your conscience, obscures your sense of God, or takes off the relish of spiritual things; in short; whatever increases the strength and authority of your body over your mind, that is sin to you; however innocent it may be in itself.

    - Robert Southey
  • Even the most stunning rose has thorns.

    - Frederic Chopin
  • I am also sure that there is no such thing as free- thinking in as much as all thinking must be must be bound by its own laws.

    - James Joyce
  • History does not record anywhere at any time a religion that has any rational basis. Religion is a crutch for people not strong enough to stand up to the unknown without help. But, like dandruff, most people do have a religion and spend time and money on it and seem to derive considerable pleasure from fiddling with it.

    - Robert Heinlein
  • Ever heard Victoria's REAL secret? Too much support hurts.

    - R. Stevens
  • I think that anyone who comes upon a Nautilus machine suddenly will agree with me that its prototype was clearly invented at some time in history when torture was considered a reasonable alternative to diplomacy.

    - Anna Quindlen
  • Woe be to him that reads but one book.

    - George Herbert
  • When you see a person who has been given more than you in money and beauty, look to those, who have been given less.

    - Prophet Muhammad
  • Gentlemen, you are now about to embark on a course of studies which will occupy you for two years. Together, they form a noble adventure. But I would like to remind you of an important point. Nothing that you will learn in the course of your studies will be of the slightest possible use to you in after life, save only this, that if you work hard and intelligently you should be able to detect when a man is talking rot, and that, in my view, is the main, if not the sole, purpose of education.

    - Alexander Smith
  • Anyone who clings to the historically untrue -- and thoroughly immoral -- doctrine that `violence never settles anything' I would advise to conjure up the ghosts of Napoleon Bonaparte and of the Duke of Wellington and let them debate it. The ghost of Hitler could referee, and the jury might well be the Dodo, the Great Auk, and the Passenger Pigeon. Violence, naked force, has settled more issues in history than has any other factor, and the contrary opinion is wishful thinking at its worst. Breeds that forget this basic truth have always paid for it with their lives and freedoms.

    - Robert Heinlein
  • Words falls upon the facts like soft snow, blurring the outline and covering up all the details.

    - George Orwell
  • When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him.

    - Thomas Szasz
  • Good manners are just a way of showing other people that we have respect for them.

    - Bill Kelly
  • It's very strange when the life you never had flashes before your eyes.

    - Terri Minsky
  • When you point to the moon, what do you see in front of your finger; Your task is to feel, not to think, when you can understand that the lesson will be learned.

    - Bruce Lee
  • Fear sometimes stops you from doing stupid things. But it can also stop you from doing creative or exciting or experimental things. It can cloud your judgment of others, and lead to all kinds of evil. The control and understanding of our personal fears is one of the most important undertakings in our life.

    - Helen Mirren
  • What actions are most excellent? To gladden the heart of human beings, to feed the hungry, to help the afflicted, to lighten the sorrow of the sorrowful, and to remove the sufferings of the injured.

    - Prophet Muhammad
  • You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view.

    - Harper Lee
  • On Valentine's Day, millions of men give millions of women flowers, cards and candy as a heartfelt expression of the emotion that also motivates men to observe anniversaries and birthdays: fear.

    - Dave Barry
  • The remarkable thing about Shakespeare is that he really is very good, in spite of all the people who say he is very good.

    - Robert Graves
  • America - a great social and economic experiment, noble in motive and far-reaching in purpose.

    - Herbert Hoover
  • See things as they are and write about them. Don’t waste your creative energy trying to make things up. Even if you are writing fiction, write the things you see and know.

    - Real Live Preacher
  • I am an unpopular electric eel in a pool of catfish.

    - Edith Sitwell
  • Every human being on this earth is born with a tragedy, and it isn't original sin. He's born with the tragedy that he has to grow up. That he has to leave the nest, the security, and go out to do battle. He has to lose everything that is lovely and fight for a new loveliness of his own making, and it's a tragedy. A lot of people don't have the courage to do it.

    - Helen Hayes
  • Happiness is a warm puppy.

    - Charles M. Schulz
  • Man always gets less than he demands from life.

    - Jack London
  • That man can destroy life is just as miraculous a feat as that he can create it, for life is the miracle, the inexplicable. In the act of destruction, man sets himself above life; he transcends himself as a creature. Thus, the ultimate choice for a man, inasmuch as he is driven to transcend himself, is to create or to destroy, to love or to hate.

    - Erich Fromm
  • Only through art can we get outside of ourselves and know another's view of the universe.

    - Marcel Proust
  • 'I am,' I saidTo no one there,And no one heard at all.

    - Neil Diamond
  • The beauty of religious mania is that it has the power to explain everything. Once God (or Satan) is accepted as the first cause of everything which happens in the mortal world, nothing is left to chance... logic can be happily tossed out the window.

    - Stephen King
  • Not until just before dawn do people sleep best; not until people get old do they become wise.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • I thank God I am not a woman, to be touched in so many giddy offences as He hath generally taxed their whole their whole sex withal.

    - William Shakespeare
  • We would accomplish many more things if we did not think of them as impossible.

    - Vince Lombardi
  • Try to put your happiness before anyone else's, because you may never have done so in your entire life, if you really think about it, if you are really honest with yourself.

    - Margaret Cho
  • Winter lies too long in country towns; hangs on until it is stale and shabby, old and sullen.

    - Willa Cather
  • Alea Iacta est... (the dice is cast)

    - Julius Caesar
  • He saw that it was an ironical thing for him to be running thus toward that which he had been at such pains to avoid. But he said, in substance, to himself that if the earth and the moon were about to clash, many people would doubtless plan to get upon the roofs to witness the collision.

    - Stephen Crane
  • I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult. But the age of chivalry is gone.

    - Edmund Burke
  • A harbor, even if it is a little harbor, is a good thing... It takes something from the world, and has something to give in return.

    - Sarah Orne Jewett
  • It is difficult to live in the present, ridiculous to live in the future, and impossible to live in the past. Nothing is as far away as one minute ago.

    - Jim Bishop
  • History is a pack of lies we play on the dead.

    - Voltaire
  • What an artist perishes with me!

    - Nero
  • It was on my fifth birthday that Papa put his hand on my shoulder and said, 'Remember, my son, if you ever need a helping hand, you'll find one at the end of your arm.'

    - Sam Levenson
  • My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;Coral is far more red than her lips' red...I love to hear her speak, yet well I knowThat music hath a far more pleasing sound.

    - William Shakespeare
  • "Knowledge, without common sense," says Lee, is "folly; without method, it is waste; without kindness, it is fanaticism; without religion, it is death." But with common sense, it is wisdom with method, it is power; with clarity, it is beneficence; with religion, it is virtue, and life, and peace.

    - Austin Farrar
  • Thy wish was father... to that thought.

    - William Shakespeare
  • A bird in the hand's worth two fleeing by.

    - Scottish Proverb
  • Most exciting ideas are not important. Most important ideas are not exciting. Not every problem has a solution. Every solution has side effects.

    - Daniel E Geer Jr.
  • Civilization is a movement and not a condition, a voyage and not a harbor.

    - Arnold Toynbee
  • Love's best habit is a soothing tongue.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Action is the foundational key to all success.

    - Tom Robbins
  • I have found that it don't really matter if you're brought up fine or rough, but that it helps to have someone to spill your sorrows to.

    - Erica Eisdorfer
  • My theory of evolution is that Darwin was adopted.

    - Steven Wright
  • All Faith is false, all Faith is true:Truth is the shattered mirror strownIn myriad bits; while each believesHis little bit the whole to own.

    - Sir Richard Francis Burton
  • To fear the foe, since fear oppresseth strength, gives in your weakness strength unto your foe.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Now the sirens have a still more fatal weapon than their song, namely their silence... someone might have escaped from their singing; but from their silence, certainly never.

    - Franz Kafka
  • If winter is slumber and spring is birth, and summer is life, then autumn rounds out to be reflection. It's a time of year when the leaves are down and the harvest is in and the perennials are gone. Mother Earth just closed up the drapes on another year and it's time to reflect on what's come before.

    - Mitchell Burgess
  • Disconnecting from change does not recapture the past. It loses the future.

    - Kathleen Norris
  • There's no bottom, none, in my voluptuousness: Your wives, your daughters, your matrons and your maids, could not fill up the cistern of my lust.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Let no man pull you low enough to hate him.

    - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • The best defence against misguided arrogance is a keen sense of humour.

    - Kathryn L. Nelson
  • It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment.

    - Freeman Dyson
  • Give us clear vision that we may know where to stand and what to stand for, because unless we stand for something, we shall fall for anything.

    - Peter Marshall
  • Never bend your head. Hold it high. Look the world straight in the eye.

    - Helen Keller
  • You can win a million battles but you can only lose one.

    - R. A. Salvatore
  • An artist does not fake reality--he *stylizes* it.

    - Ayn Rand
  • Isn't it fascinating how long a few minutes seem when you are completely alone with not a familiar face in sight?

    - Kirby Larson
  • I'm seventeen and I'm crazy. My uncle says the two always go together. When people ask your age, he said, always say seventeen and insane.

    - Ray Bradbury
  • When he stood up, it was a very complicated motion. If the deck chairs on the Ship to the Sea of Night had opened up, they would have done so like that. It was like he was unfolding himself forever.

    - Neil Gaiman
  • The dark today leads into light tomorrow;There is no endless joy,...and yet no endless sorrow.

    - Ella Wheeler Wilcox
  • If you shoot at mimes, should you use a silencer?

    - Steven Wright
  • Distribution should undo excess, and each man have enough.

    - William Shakespeare
  • The best way to have a good idea is to have lots of ideas.

    - Linus Pauling
  • We all make our limits, and we set them further out than we have any right.

    - Robert Jordan
  • We must beware of trying to build a society in which nobody counts for anything except a politician or an official, a society where enterprise gains no reward and thrift no privileges.

    - Winston Spencer Churchill
  • You begin saving the world by saving one man at a time; all else is grandiose romanticism or politics.

    - Charles Bukowski
  • The most common of all follies is to believe passionately in the palpably not true. It is the chief occupation of mankind.

    - H. L. Mencken
  • Having a baby's sweet face so close to your own, for so long a time as it takes to nurse 'em, is a great tonic for a sad soul.

    - Erica Eisdorfer
  • Boldness in itself is genius.

    - L. Ron Hubbard
  • The whole art of politics consists in directing rationally the irrationalities of men.

    - Reinhold Niebuhr
  • A book holds a house of gold.

    - Chinese Proverb
  • We don't always get to choose what we love.

    - Scott Westerfeld
  • Whatever became of the moment when one first knew about death? There must have been one. A moment. In childhood. When it first occured to you that you don't go on forever. It must have been shattering, stamped into one's memory. And yet, I can't remember it.

    - Tom Stoppard
  • There are many shining qualities on the mind of man; but none so useful as discretion. It is this which gives a value to all the rest, and sets them at work in their proper places, and turns them to the advantage of their possessor. Without it, learning is pedantry; wit, impertinence; virtue itself looks like weakness; and the best parts only qualify a man to be more sprightly in errors, and active to his own prejudice. Though a man has all other perfections and wants discretion, he will be of no great consequence in the world; but if he has this single talent in perfection, and but a common share of others, he may do what he pleases in his station of life.

    - Joseph Addison
  • I learned this, at least, by my experiment; that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will put some things behind, will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings. In proportion as he simplifies his life, the laws of the universe will appear less complex, and solitude will not be solitude, nor poverty poverty, nor weakness weakness. If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

    - Henry David Thoreau
  • Let this be understood, then, at starting; that the patient conquest of difficulties which rise in the regular and legitimate channels of business and enterprise is not only essential in securing the success which you seek but it is essential to that preparation of your mind, requisite for the enjoyment of your successes, and for retaining them when gained. So, day by day, and week by week; so month after month, and year after year, work on, and in that progress gain in strength and symmetry, and nerve and knowledge, that when success, patiently and bravely worked for, shall come, it may find you prepared to receive it and keep it.

    - Josiah Gilbert Holland
  • The author of genius does keep till his last breath the spontaneity, the ready sensitiveness, of a child, the "innocence of eye" that means so much to the painter, the ability to respond freshly and quickly to new scenes, and to old scenes as though they were new; to see traits and characteristics as though each were new-minted from the hand of God instead of sorting them quickly into dusty categories and pigeon-holing them without wonder or surprise; to feel situations so immediately and keenly that the word "trite" has hardly any meaning for him; and always to see "the correspondences between things" of which Aristotle spoke two thousand years ago.

    - Dorothea Brande
  • LEONINE, adj. Unlike a menagerie lion. Leonine verses are those in which a word in the middle of a line rhymes with a word at the end, as in this famous passage from Bella Peeler Silcox:The electric light invades the dunnest deep of Hades.Cries Pluto, 'twixt his snores: "O tempora! O mores!"It should be explained that Mrs. Silcox does not undertake to teach pronunciation of the Greek and Latin tongues. Leonine verses are so called in honor of a poet named Leo, whom prosodists appear to find a pleasure in believing to have been the first to discover that a rhyming couplet could be run into a single line.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Divide and rule, a sound motto. Unite and lead, a better one.

    - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • Too often we give children answers to remember rather than problems to solve.

    - Roger Lewin
  • Acquire inner peace and a multitude will find their salvation near you.

    - Catherine De Hueck Doherty
  • Live simply that others may simply live.

    - Mahatma Gandhi
  • The aim of life is self-development. To realize one's nature perfectly - that is what each of us is here for.

    - Oscar Wilde
  • The only thing that's been a worse flop than the organization of non-violence has been the organization of violence.

    - Joan Baez
  • Life is a foreign language; all men mispronounce it.

    - Christopher Morley
  • Is love supposed to last throughout all time, or is it like trains changing at random stops. If I loved her, how could I leave her? If I felt that way then, how come I don't feel anything now?

    - Jeff Melvoin
  • Let them hate us, as long as they fear us.

    - Caligula (Gaius Caesar)
  • Train yourself to let go of the things you fear to lose.

    - George Lucas
  • A camel never sees its own hump.

    - African Proverb
  • Spontaneous kindness is to hipsters as high beams are to deer.

    - Jeph Jacques
  • Some succeed because they are destined to, but most succeed because they are determined to.

    - Henry Van Dyke
  • The very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream.

    - William Shakespeare
  • In order to succeed, we must first believe that we can.

    - Michael Korda
  • In the late 19th century Evanston, Illinois, nicknamed "Heavenston" by Frances Willard, was a Methodist-minded town, so pious that the town fathers, resenting the dissipating influence of the soda fountain, passed an ordinance forbidding the sale of ice cream sodas on Sunday. Some ingenious confectioners, obeying the law, served ice cream with syrup but no soda. This sodaless soda was the Sunday soda, and became so popular that orders for "Sundays" crossed the counter everyday of the week. When objection was raised to christening the dish after the Sabbath, the spelling was changed to Sundae, and so developed one of America's most characteristic dishes.

    - William Lyon Phelps
  • FLY-SPECK, n. The prototype of punctuation. It is observed by Garvinus that the systems of punctuation in use by the various literary nations depended originally upon the social habits and general diet of the flies infesting the several countries. These creatures, which have always been distinguished for a neighborly and companionable familiarity with authors, liberally or niggardly embellish the manuscripts in process of growth under the pen, according to their bodily habit, bringing out the sense of the work by a species of interpretation superior to, and independent of, the writer's powers. The "old masters" of literature -- that is to say, the early writers whose work is so esteemed by later scribes and critics in the same language -- never punctuated at all, but worked right along free-handed, without that abruption of the thought which comes from the use of points. (We observe the same thing in children to-day, whose usage in this particular is a striking and beautiful instance of the law that the infancy of individuals reproduces the methods and stages of development characterizing the infancy of races.) In the work of these primitive scribes all the punctuation is found, by the modern investigator with his optical instruments and chemical tests, to have been inserted by the writers' ingenious and serviceable collaborator, the common house-fly -- _Musca maledicta_. In transcribing these ancient MSS, for the purpose of either making the work their own or preserving what they naturally regard as divine revelations, later writers reverently and accurately copy whatever marks they find upon the papyrus or parchment, to the unspeakable enhancement of the lucidity of the thought and value of the work. Writers contemporary with the copyists naturally avail themselves of the obvious advantages of these marks in their own work, and with such assistance as the flies of their own household may be willing to grant, frequently rival and sometimes surpass the older compositions, in respect at least of punctuation, which is no small glory. Fully to understand the important services that flies perform to literature it is only necessary to lay a page of some popular novelist alongside a saucer of cream-and-molasses in a sunny room and observe "how the wit brightens and the style refines" in accurate proportion to the duration of exposure.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • FOLLY, n. That "gift and faculty divine" whose creative and controlling energy inspires Man's mind, guides his actions and adorns his life.Folly! although Erasmus praised thee onceIn a thick volume, and all authors known,If not thy glory yet thy power have shown,Deign to take homage from thy son who huntsThrough all thy maze his brothers, fool and dunce,To mend their lives and to sustain his own,However feebly be his arrows thrown,Howe'er each hide the flying weapons blunts.All-Father Folly! be it mine to raise,With lusty lung, here on his western strandWith all thine offspring thronged from every land,Thyself inspiring me, the song of praise.And if too weak, I'll hire, to help me bawl,Dick Watson Gilder, gravest of us all.Aramis Loto Frope

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • GNOME, n. In North-European mythology, a dwarfish imp inhabiting the interior parts of the earth and having special custody of mineral treasures. Bjorsen, who died in 1765, says gnomes were common enough in the southern parts of Sweden in his boyhood, and he frequently saw them scampering on the hills in the evening twilight. Ludwig Binkerhoof saw three as recently as 1792, in the Black Forest, and Sneddeker avers that in 1803 they drove a party of miners out of a Silesian mine. Basing our computations upon data supplied by these statements, we find that the gnomes were probably extinct as early as 1764.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • HALF, n. One of two equal parts into which a thing may be divided, or considered as divided. In the fourteenth century a heated discussion arose among theologists and philosophers as to whether Omniscience could part an object into three halves; and the pious Father Aldrovinus publicly prayed in the cathedral at Rouen that God would demonstrate the affirmative of the proposition in some signal and unmistakable way, and particularly (if it should please Him) upon the body of that hardy blasphemer, Manutius Procinus, who maintained the negative. Procinus, however, was spared to die of the bite of a viper.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • HALO, n. Properly, a luminous ring encircling an astronomical body, but not infrequently confounded with "aureola," or "nimbus," a somewhat similar phenomenon worn as a head-dress by divinities and saints. The halo is a purely optical illusion, produced by moisture in the air, in the manner of a rainbow; but the aureola is conferred as a sign of superior sanctity, in the same way as a bishop's mitre, or the Pope's tiara. In the painting of the Nativity, by Szedgkin, a pious artist of Pesth, not only do the Virgin and the Child wear the nimbus, but an ass nibbling hay from the sacred manger is similarly decorated and, to his lasting honor be it said, appears to bear his unaccustomed dignity with a truly saintly grace.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MAGNITUDE, n. Size. Magnitude being purely relative, nothing is large and nothing small. If everything in the universe were increased in bulk one thousand diameters nothing would be any larger than it was before, but if one thing remain unchanged all the others would be larger than they had been. To an understanding familiar with the relativity of magnitude and distance the spaces and masses of the astronomer would be no more impressive than those of the microscopist. For anything we know to the contrary, the visible universe may be a small part of an atom, with its component ions, floating in the life- fluid (luminiferous ether) of some animal. Possibly the wee creatures peopling the corpuscles of our own blood are overcome with the proper emotion when contemplating the unthinkable distance from one of these to another.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MOLECULE, n. The ultimate, indivisible unit of matter. It is distinguished from the corpuscle, also the ultimate, indivisible unit of matter, by a closer resemblance to the atom, also the ultimate, indivisible unit of matter. Three great scientific theories of the structure of the universe are the molecular, the corpuscular and the atomic. A fourth affirms, with Haeckel, the condensation of precipitation of matter from ether -- whose existence is proved by the condensation of precipitation. The present trend of scientific thought is toward the theory of ions. The ion differs from the molecule, the corpuscle and the atom in that it is an ion. A fifth theory is held by idiots, but it is doubtful if they know any more about the matter than the others.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • LIFE, n. A spiritual pickle preserving the body from decay. We live in daily apprehension of its loss; yet when lost it is not missed. The question, "Is life worth living?" has been much discussed; particularly by those who think it is not, many of whom have written at great length in support of their view and by careful observance of the laws of health enjoyed for long terms of years the honors of successful controversy."Life's not worth living, and that's the truth,"Carelessly caroled the golden youth.In manhood still he maintained that viewAnd held it more strongly the older he grew.When kicked by a jackass at eighty-three,"Go fetch me a surgeon at once!" cried he.Han Soper

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • A musicologist is a man who can read music but can't hear it.

    - Sir Thomas Beecham
  • TARIFF, n. A scale of taxes on imports, designed to protect the domestic producer against the greed of his consumer.The Enemy of Human SoulsSat grieving at the cost of coals;For Hell had been annexed of late,And was a sovereign Southern State."It were no more than right," said he,"That I should get my fuel free.The duty, neither just nor wise,Compels me to economize --Whereby my broilers, every one,Are execrably underdone.What would they have? -- although I yearnTo do them nicely to a turn,I can't afford an honest heat.This tariff makes even devils cheat!I'm ruined, and my humble tradeAll rascals may at will invade:Beneath my nose the public pressOutdoes me in sulphureousness;The bar ingeniously appliesTo my undoing my own lies;My medicines the doctors use(Albeit vainly) to refuseTo me my fair and rightful preyAnd keep their own in shape to pay;The preachers by example teachWhat, scorning to perform, I teach;And statesmen, aping me, all makeMore promises than they can break.Against such competition ILift up a disregarded cry.Since all ignore my just complaint,By Hokey-Pokey! I'll turn saint!"Now, the Republicans, who allAre saints, began at once to bawlAgainst _his_ competition; soThere was a devil of a go!They locked horns with him, tete-a-teteIn acrimonious debate,Till Democrats, forlorn and lone,Had hopes of coming by their own.That evil to avert, in hasteThe two belligerents embraced;But since 'twere wicked to relaxA tittle of the Sacred Tax,'Twas finally agreed to grantThe bold Insurgent-protestantA bounty on each soul that fellInto his ineffectual Hell.Edam Smith

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • WRATH, n. Anger of a superior quality and degree, appropriate to exalted characters and momentous occasions; as, "the wrath of God," "the day of wrath," etc. Amongst the ancients the wrath of kings was deemed sacred, for it could usually command the agency of some god for its fit manifestation, as could also that of a priest. The Greeks before Troy were so harried by Apollo that they jumped out of the frying-pan of the wrath of Cryses into the fire of the wrath of Achilles, though Agamemnon, the sole offender, was neither fried nor roasted. A similar noted immunity was that of David when he incurred the wrath of Yahveh by numbering his people, seventy thousand of whom paid the penalty with their lives. God is now Love, and a director of the census performs his work without apprehension of disaster.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • CONTROVERSY, n. A battle in which spittle or ink replaces the injurious cannon-ball and the inconsiderate bayonet.In controversy with the facile tongue --That bloodless warfare of the old and young --So seek your adversary to engageThat on himself he shall exhaust his rage,And, like a snake that's fastened to the ground,With his own fangs inflict the fatal wound.You ask me how this miracle is done?Adopt his own opinions, one by one,And taunt him to refute them; in his wrathHe'll sweep them pitilessly from his path.Advance then gently all you wish to prove,Each proposition prefaced with, "As you'veSo well remarked," or, "As you wisely say,And I cannot dispute," or, "By the way,This view of it which, better far expressed,Runs through your argument." Then leave the restTo him, secure that he'll perform his trustAnd prove your views intelligent and just.Conmore Apel Brune

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • INAUSPICIOUSLY, adv. In an unpromising manner, the auspices being unfavorable. Among the Romans it was customary before undertaking any important action or enterprise to obtain from the augurs, or state prophets, some hint of its probable outcome; and one of their favorite and most trustworthy modes of divination consisted in observing the flight of birds -- the omens thence derived being called _auspices_. Newspaper reporters and certain miscreant lexicographers have decided that the word -- always in the plural -- shall mean "patronage" or "management"; as, "The festivities were under the auspices of the Ancient and Honorable Order of Body-Snatchers"; or, "The hilarities were auspicated by the Knights of Hunger."A Roman slave appeared one dayBefore the Augur. "Tell me, pray,If --" here the Augur, smiling, madeA checking gesture and displayedHis open palm, which plainly itched,For visibly its surface twitched.A _denarius_ (the Latin nickel)Successfully allayed the tickle,And then the slave proceeded: "PleaseInform me whether Fate decreesSuccess or failure in what ITo-night (if it be dark) shall try.Its nature? Never mind -- I think'Tis writ on this" -- and with a winkWhich darkened half the earth, he drewAnother denarius to view,Its shining face attentive scanned,Then slipped it into the good man's hand,Who with great gravity said: "WaitWhile I retire to question Fate."That holy person then withdrewHis scared clay and, passing throughThe temple's rearward gate, cried "Shoo!"Waving his robe of office. StraightEach sacred peacock and its mate(Maintained for Juno's favor) fledWith clamor from the trees o'erhead,Where they were perching for the night.The temple's roof received their flight,For thither they would always go,When danger threatened them below.Back to the slave the Augur went:"My son, forecasting the eventBy flight of birds, I must confessThe auspices deny success."That slave retired, a sadder man,Abandoning his secret plan --Which was (as well the craft seerHad from the first divined) to clearThe wall and fraudulently seizeOn Juno's poultry in the trees.G.J.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • ART, n. This word has no definition. Its origin is related as follows by the ingenious Father Gassalasca Jape, S.J.One day a wag -- what would the wretch be at? --Shifted a letter of the cipher RAT,And said it was a god's name! Straight aroseFantastic priests and postulants (with shows,And mysteries, and mummeries, and hymns,And disputations dire that lamed their limbs)To serve his temple and maintain the fires,Expound the law, manipulate the wires.Amazed, the populace that rites attend,Believe whate'er they cannot comprehend,And, inly edified to learn that twoHalf-hairs joined so and so (as Art can do)Have sweeter values and a grace more fitThan Nature's hairs that never have been split,Bring cates and wines for sacrificial feasts,And sell their garments to support the priests.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • SCIMETAR, n. A curved sword of exceeding keenness, in the conduct of which certain Orientals attain a surprising proficiency, as the incident here related will serve to show. The account is translated from the Japanese by Shusi Itama, a famous writer of the thirteenth century.When the great Gichi-Kuktai was Mikado he condemned to decapitation Jijiji Ri, a high officer of the Court. Soon after the hour appointed for performance of the rite what was his Majesty's surprise to see calmly approaching the throne the man who should have been at that time ten minutes dead!"Seventeen hundred impossible dragons!" shouted the enraged monarch. "Did I not sentence you to stand in the market-place and have your head struck off by the public executioner at three o'clock? And is it not now 3:10?""Son of a thousand illustrious deities," answered the condemned minister, "all that you say is so true that the truth is a lie in comparison. But your heavenly Majesty's sunny and vitalizing wishes have been pestilently disregarded. With joy I ran and placed my unworthy body in the market-place. The executioner appeared with his bare scimetar, ostentatiously whirled it in air, and then, tapping me lightly upon the neck, strode away, pelted by the populace, with whom I was ever a favorite. I am come to pray for justice upon his own dishonorable and treasonous head.""To what regiment of executioners does the black-boweled caitiff belong?" asked the Mikado."To the gallant Ninety-eight Hundred and Thirty-seventh -- I know the man. His name is Sakko-Samshi.""Let him be brought before me," said the Mikado to an attendant, and a half-hour later the culprit stood in the Presence."Thou bastard son of a three-legged hunchback without thumbs!" roared the sovereign -- "why didst thou but lightly tap the neck that it should have been thy pleasure to sever?""Lord of Cranes of Cherry Blooms," replied the executioner, unmoved, "command him to blow his nose with his fingers."Being commanded, Jijiji Ri laid hold of his nose and trumpeted like an elephant, all expecting to see the severed head flung violently from him. Nothing occurred: the performance prospered peacefully to the close, without incident.All eyes were now turned on the executioner, who had grown as white as the snows on the summit of Fujiama. His legs trembled and his breath came in gasps of terror."Several kinds of spike-tailed brass lions!" he cried; "I am a ruined and disgraced swordsman! I struck the villain feebly because in flourishing the scimetar I had accidentally passed it through my own neck! Father of the Moon, I resign my office."So saying, he gasped his top-knot, lifted off his head, and advancing to the throne laid it humbly at the Mikado's feet.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Fasting and natural diet, though essentially unknown [in today's U.S.] as a therapy, should be the first treatment when someone discovers that she or he has a medical problem. It should not be applied only to the most advanced cases, as is present practice. Whether the patient has a cardiac condition, hypertension, autoimmune disease, fibroids, or asthma, he or she must be informed that fasting and natural, plant-based diets are a viable alternative to conventional therapy, and an effective one. The time may come when not offering this substantially more effective nutritional approach will be considered malpractice.

    - Joel Fuhrman, M.D.
  • FRANKALMOIGNE, n. The tenure by which a religious corporation holds lands on condition of praying for the soul of the donor. In mediaeval times many of the wealthiest fraternities obtained their estates in this simple and cheap manner, and once when Henry VIII of England sent an officer to confiscate certain vast possessions which a fraternity of monks held by frankalmoigne, "What!" said the Prior, "would you master stay our benefactor's soul in Purgatory?" "Ay," said the officer, coldly, "an ye will not pray him thence for naught he must e'en roast." "But look you, my son," persisted the good man, "this act hath rank as robbery of God!" "Nay, nay, good father, my master the king doth but deliver him from the manifold temptations of too great wealth."

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • An atheist is a man who has no invisible means of support.

    - John Buchan
  • The way we see the problem is the problem.

    - Stephen Covey
  • You cannot compile a wit out of two half-wits.

    - Joe Orton
  • Painting in watercolor is like walking a tight-rope; one must achieve a perfect balance between what the paint wants to do and what the artist wants to do, or all is lost.

    - Mary C. Taylor
  • J.F.K.--The Man and the Airport

    - Unknown
  • I am at two with nature.

    - Woody Allen
  • It is the soldier who salutes the flag, serves beneath the flag, whose coffin is draped by the flag who gives that protester the freedom to abuse and burn that flag.

    - Zell Miller
  • FREEDOM, n. Exemption from the stress of authority in a beggarly half dozen of restraint's infinite multitude of methods. A political condition that every nation supposes itself to enjoy in virtual monopoly. Liberty. The distinction between freedom and liberty is not accurately known; naturalists have never been able to find a living specimen of either.Freedom, as every schoolboy knows,Once shrieked as Kosciusko fell;On every wind, indeed, that blowsI hear her yell.She screams whenever monarchs meet,And parliaments as well,To bind the chains about her feetAnd toll her knell.And when the sovereign people castThe votes they cannot spell,Upon the pestilential blastHer clamors swell.For all to whom the power's givenTo sway or to compel,Among themselves apportion HeavenAnd give her Hell.Blary O'Gary

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • LL.D. Letters indicating the degree _Legumptionorum Doctor_, one learned in laws, gifted with legal gumption. Some suspicion is cast upon this derivation by the fact that the title was formerly _LL.d._, and conferred only upon gentlemen distinguished for their wealth. At the date of this writing Columbia University is considering the expediency of making another degree for clergymen, in place of the old D.D. -- _Damnator Diaboli_. The new honor will be known as _Sanctorum Custus_, and written _$$c_. The name of the Rev. John Satan has been suggested as a suitable recipient by a lover of consistency, who points out that Professor Harry Thurston Peck has long enjoyed the advantage of a degree.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MAIDEN, n. A young person of the unfair sex addicted to clewless conduct and views that madden to crime. The genus has a wide geographical distribution, being found wherever sought and deplored wherever found. The maiden is not altogether unpleasing to the eye, nor (without her piano and her views) insupportable to the ear, though in respect to comeliness distinctly inferior to the rainbow, and, with regard to the part of her that is audible, bleating out of the field by the canary -- which, also, is more portable.A lovelorn maiden she sat and sang --This quaint, sweet song sang she;"It's O for a youth with a football bangAnd a muscle fair to see!The Captain heOf a team to be!On the gridiron he shall shine,A monarch by right divine,And never to roast on it -- me!"Opoline Jones

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • HIBERNATE, v.i. To pass the winter season in domestic seclusion. There have been many singular popular notions about the hibernation of various animals. Many believe that the bear hibernates during the whole winter and subsists by mechanically sucking its paws. It is admitted that it comes out of its retirement in the spring so lean that it had to try twice before it can cast a shadow. Three or four centuries ago, in England, no fact was better attested than that swallows passed the winter months in the mud at the bottom of their brooks, clinging together in globular masses. They have apparently been compelled to give up the custom and account of the foulness of the brooks. Sotus Ecobius discovered in Central Asia a whole nation of people who hibernate. By some investigators, the fasting of Lent is supposed to have been originally a modified form of hibernation, to which the Church gave a religious significance; but this view was strenuously opposed by that eminent authority, Bishop Kip, who did not wish any honors denied to the memory of the Founder of his family.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • You dehumanize a man as much by returning him to nature - by making him one with rocks, vegetation, and animals - as by turning him into a machine. Both the natural and the mechanical are the opposite of that which is uniquely human. Nature is a self-made machine, more perfectly automated than any automated machine. To create something in the image of nature is to create a machine, and it was by learning the inner working of nature that man became a builder of machines. It is also obvious that when man domesticated animals and plants he acquired self-made machines for the production of food, power, and beauty.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • Our subconscious minds have no sense of humor, play no jokes and cannot tell the difference between reality and an imagined thought or image. What we continually think about eventually will manifest in our lives. Unfortunately most of us are completely unaware of this fact and we do not monitor our thoughts with the care needed so that we can create in our lives the results we say we want. Since the great majority of people do not feel worthy and deserving of abundant good fortune, radiant good health and total success in all areas of their lives that overriding thought pattern controls the results people get. The first order of business of anyone who wants to enjoy success in all areas of hisher life is to take charge of the internal dialogue they have and only think, say and behavior in a manner consistent with the results they truly desire.

    - Sidney Madwed
  • Why, of course, the people don't want war. Why would some poor slob on a farm want to risk his life in a war when the best that he can get out of it is to come back to his farm in one piece. Naturally, the common people don't want war; neither in Russia nor in England nor in America, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But, after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy or a fascist dictatorship or a Parliament or a Communist dictatorship... voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country.

    - Hermann Göring
  • TOPE, v. To tipple, booze, swill, soak, guzzle, lush, bib, or swig. In the individual, toping is regarded with disesteem, but toping nations are in the forefront of civilization and power. When pitted against the hard-drinking Christians the absemious Mahometans go down like grass before the scythe. In India one hundred thousand beef- eating and brandy-and-soda guzzling Britons hold in subjection two hundred and fifty million vegetarian abstainers of the same Aryan race. With what an easy grace the whisky-loving American pushed the temperate Spaniard out of his possessions! From the time when the Berserkers ravaged all the coasts of western Europe and lay drunk in every conquered port it has been the same way: everywhere the nations that drink too much are observed to fight rather well and not too righteously. Wherefore the estimable old ladies who abolished the canteen from the American army may justly boast of having materially augmented the nation's military power.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Let's not escape into mathematics. Let's stay with reality.

    - Michael Crichton
  • When words fail, music speaks.

    - Hans Christian Andersen
  • The motivation for all personal behavior is to produce a sense of "FEEL GOOD," a sense of inner peace and well being. To expect a person to go against his desire to feel good or as good as he can feel under any momentary condition is illogical and irrational. In the observation of human behavior, one will notice every human act is a response to a personal need. This is true whether one signs a million dollar contract, scratches one's nose, rolls over in bed, or just day dreams his life away. People will do things which seem contrary to this concept, but the bottom line is they perceive some kind of payoff which will make them feel good. And the payoff is almost always emotional. When you ask people why they want to be financially independent, they might say that they could buy things without having to worry about where the money will come from. And when they worry, they don't FEEL GOOD. A drug addict, a compulsive eater, an alcoholic and anyone with a compulsive habit will continue with their habits because at the moment of action they believe and feel it will make them feel good. That is why breaking compulsive habits are so difficult.

    - Sidney Madwed
  • ABRACADABRA. By _Abracadabra_ we signifyAn infinite number of things.'Tis the answer to What? and How? and Why?And Whence? and Whither? -- a word wherebyThe Truth (with the comfort it brings)Is open to all who grope in night,Crying for Wisdom's holy light.Whether the word is a verb or a nounIs knowledge beyond my reach.I only know that 'tis handed down.From sage to sage,From age to age --An immortal part of speech!Of an ancient man the tale is toldThat he lived to be ten centuries old,In a cave on a mountain side.(True, he finally died.)The fame of his wisdom filled the land,For his head was bald, and you'll understandHis beard was long and whiteAnd his eyes uncommonly bright.Philosophers gathered from far and nearTo sit at his feat and hear and hear,Though he never was heardTo utter a wordBut "_Abracadabra, abracadab_,_Abracada, abracad_,_Abraca, abrac, abra, ab!_"'Twas all he had,'Twas all they wanted to hear, and eachMade copious notes of the mystical speech,Which they published next --A trickle of textIn the meadow of commentary.Mighty big books were these,In a number, as leaves of trees;In learning, remarkably -- very!He's dead,As I said,And the books of the sages have perished,But his wisdom is sacredly cherished.In _Abracadabra_ it solemnly rings,Like an ancient bell that forever swings.O, I love to hearThat word make clearHumanity's General Sense of Things.Jamrach Holobom

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • We always do what we MOST WANT to do, whether or not we like what we are doing at each instant of our lives. Wanting and liking many times are not the same thing. Many people have done what they say they didn't want to do at a particular moment. And that may be true until one looks deeper into the motivation behind the doing. What they are really saying is the price they will have to pay or the consequences they will have to endure, for not doing that something may be too high or onerous for them not to do it. Such as going to work. Many people say they don't want to go to work and yet they go. Which means they don't want to risk losing their jobs and the negative hurting emotions associated with not having a job. It has been estimated about 90% to 95% of all people work at jobs which are unfulfilling and which they dislike and would leave in a minute if they only knew what they really wanted to do.

    - Sidney Madwed
  • The quality of mercy is not strain'd,It droppeth as the gentle rain from heavenUpon the place beneath. It is twice blest:It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.'T is mightiest in the mightiest: it becomesThe throned monarch better than his crown;His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,The attribute to awe and majesty,Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;But mercy is above this sceptred sway,It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,It is an attribute to God himself;And earthly power doth then show likest God's,When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew,Though justice be thy plea, consider this,That in the course of justice none of usShould see salvation: we do pray for mercy;And that same prayer doth teach us all to renderThe deeds of mercy.

    - William Shakespeare
  • WOMAN, n.An animal usually living in the vicinity of Man, and having a rudimentary susceptibility to domestication. It is credited by many of the elder zoologists with a certain vestigial docility acquired in a former state of seclusion, but naturalists of the postsusananthony period, having no knowledge of the seclusion, deny the virtue and declare that such as creation's dawn beheld, it roareth now. The species is the most widely distributed of all beasts of prey, infesting all habitable parts of the globe, from Greeland's spicy mountains to India's moral strand. The popular name (wolfman) is incorrect, for the creature is of the cat kind. The woman is lithe and graceful in its movement, especially the American variety (_felis pugnans_), is omnivorous and can be taught not to talk.Balthasar Pober

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • X in our alphabet being a needless letter has an added invincibility to the attacks of the spelling reformers, and like them, will doubtless last as long as the language. X is the sacred symbol of ten dollars, and in such words as Xmas, Xn, etc., stands for Christ, not, as is popular supposed, because it represents a cross, but because the corresponding letter in the Greek alphabet is the initial of his name -- _Xristos_. If it represented a cross it would stand for St. Andrew, who "testified" upon one of that shape. In the algebra of psychology x stands for Woman's mind. Words beginning with X are Grecian and will not be defined in this standard English dictionary.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Now is the winter of our discontentMade glorious summer by this son of York,And all the clouds that loured upon our houseIn the deep bosom of the ocean buried.

    - William Shakespeare
  • There are fine things which you mean to do some day, under what you think will be more favorable circumstances. But the only time that is surely yours is the present, hence this is the time to speak the word of appreciation and sympathy, to do the generous deed, to forgive the fault of a thoughtless friend, to sacrifice self a little more for others. Today is the day in which to express your noblest qualities of mind and heart, to do at least one worthy thing which you have long postponed, and to use your God-given abilities for the enrichment of someone less fortunate. Today you can make your life - significant and worthwhile. The present is yours to do with as you will.

    - Grenville Kleiser
  • A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves largesse from the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates promising the most benefits from the public treasury with the result that a democracy always collapses over lousy fiscal policy, always followed by a dictatorship. The average of the world%uFFFDs great civilizations before they decline has been 200 years. These nations have progressed in this sequence: From bondage to spiritual faith; from faith to great courage; from courage to liberty; from liberty to abundance; from abundance to selfishness; from selfishness to Complacency; from complacency to apathy; from apathy to dependency; from dependency back again to bondage.

    - Alexander Fraser Tyler
  • DECIDE, v.i. To succumb to the preponderance of one set of influences over another set.A leaf was riven from a tree,"I mean to fall to earth," said he.The west wind, rising, made him veer."Eastward," said he, "I now shall steer."The east wind rose with greater force.Said he: "'Twere wise to change my course."With equal power they contend.He said: "My judgment I suspend."Down died the winds; the leaf, elate,Cried: "I've decided to fall straight.""First thoughts are best?" That's not the moral;Just choose your own and we'll not quarrel.Howe'er your choice may chance to fall,You'll have no hand in it at all.G.J.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • IMMODEST, adj. Having a strong sense of one's own merit, coupled with a feeble conception of worth in others.There was once a man in IspahanEver and ever so long ago,And he had a head, the phrenologists said,That fitted him for a show.For his modesty's bump was so large a lump(Nature, they said, had taken a freak)That its summit stood far above the woodOf his hair, like a mountain peak.So modest a man in all Ispahan,Over and over again they swore --So humble and meek, you would vainly seek;None ever was found before.Meantime the hump of that awful bumpInto the heavens contrived to getTo so great a height that they called the wightThe man with the minaret.There wasn't a man in all IspahanProuder, or louder in praise of his chump:With a tireless tongue and a brazen lungHe bragged of that beautiful bumpTill the Shah in a rage sent a trusty pageBearing a sack and a bow-string too,And that gentle child explained as he smiled:"A little present for you."The saddest man in all Ispahan,Sniffed at the gift, yet accepted the same."If I'd lived," said he, "my humilityHad given me deathless fame!"Sukker Uffro

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • IMPALE, v.t. In popular usage to pierce with any weapon which remains fixed in the wound. This, however, is inaccurate; to imaple is, properly, to put to death by thrusting an upright sharp stake into the body, the victim being left in a sitting position. This was a common mode of punishment among many of the nations of antiquity, and is still in high favor in China and other parts of Asia. Down to the beginning of the fifteenth century it was widely employed in "churching" heretics and schismatics. Wolecraft calls it the "stoole of repentynge," and among the common people it was jocularly known as "riding the one legged horse." Ludwig Salzmann informs us that in Thibet impalement is considered the most appropriate punishment for crimes against religion; and although in China it is sometimes awarded for secular offences, it is most frequently adjudged in cases of sacrilege. To the person in actual experience of impalement it must be a matter of minor importance by what kind of civil or religious dissent he was made acquainted with its discomforts; but doubtless he would feel a certain satisfaction if able to contemplate himself in the character of a weather-cock on the spire of the True Church.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • INADMISSIBLE, adj. Not competent to be considered. Said of certain kinds of testimony which juries are supposed to be unfit to be entrusted with, and which judges, therefore, rule out, even of proceedings before themselves alone. Hearsay evidence is inadmissible because the person quoted was unsworn and is not before the court for examination; yet most momentous actions, military, political, commercial and of every other kind, are daily undertaken on hearsay evidence. There is no religion in the world that has any other basis than hearsay evidence. Revelation is hearsay evidence; that the Scriptures are the word of God we have only the testimony of men long dead whose identity is not clearly established and who are not known to have been sworn in any sense. Under the rules of evidence as they now exist in this country, no single assertion in the Bible has in its support any evidence admissible in a court of law. It cannot be proved that the battle of Blenheim ever was fought, that there was such as person as Julius Caesar, such an empire as Assyria. But as records of courts of justice are admissible, it can easily be proved that powerful and malevolent magicians once existed and were a scourge to mankind. The evidence (including confession) upon which certain women were convicted of witchcraft and executed was without a flaw; it is still unimpeachable. The judges' decisions based on it were sound in logic and in law. Nothing in any existing court was ever more thoroughly proved than the charges of witchcraft and sorcery for which so many suffered death. If there were no witches, human testimony and human reason are alike destitute of value.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • IMPROBABILITY, n.His tale he told with a solemn faceAnd a tender, melancholy grace.Improbable 'twas, no doubt,When you came to think it out,But the fascinated crowdTheir deep surprise avowedAnd all with a single voice averred'Twas the most amazing thing they'd heard --All save one who spake never a word,But sat as mumAs if deaf and dumb,Serene, indifferent and unstirred.Then all the others turned to himAnd scrutinized him limb from limb --Scanned him alive;But he seemed to thriveAnd tranquiler grow each minute,As if there were nothing in it."What! what!" cried one, "are you not amazedAt what our friend has told?" He raisedSoberly then his eyes and gazedIn a natural wayAnd proceeded to say,As he crossed his feet on the mantel-shelf:"O no -- not at all; I'm a liar myself."

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Some men are born mediocre, some men achieve mediocrity, and some men have mediocrity thrust upon them.

    - Joseph Heller
  • EMBALM, v.i. To cheat vegetation by locking up the gases upon which it feeds. By embalming their dead and thereby deranging the natural balance between animal and vegetable life, the Egyptians made their once fertile and populous country barren and incapable of supporting more than a meagre crew. The modern metallic burial casket is a step in the same direction, and many a dead man who ought now to be ornamenting his neighbor's lawn as a tree, or enriching his table as a bunch of radishes, is doomed to a long inutility. We shall get him after awhile if we are spared, but in the meantime the violet and rose are languishing for a nibble at his _glutoeus maximus_.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • America is a mistake, a giant mistake.

    - Sigmund Freud
  • The thing that impresses me the most about America is the way parents obey their children.

    - King Edward Viii
  • INFERIAE,n. [Latin] Among the Greeks and Romans, sacrifices for propitation of the _Dii Manes_, or souls of the dead heroes; for the pious ancients could not invent enough gods to satisfy their spiritual needs, and had to have a number of makeshift deities, or, as a sailor might say, jury-gods, which they made out of the most unpromising materials. It was while sacrificing a bullock to the spirit of Agamemnon that Laiaides, a priest of Aulis, was favored with an audience of that illustrious warrior's shade, who prophetically recounted to him the birth of Christ and the triumph of Christianity, giving him also a rapid but tolerably complete review of events down to the reign of Saint Louis. The narrative ended abruptly at the point, owing to the inconsiderate crowing of a cock, which compelled the ghosted King of Men to scamper back to Hades. There is a fine mediaeval flavor to this story, and as it has not been traced back further than Pere Brateille, a pious but obscure writer at the court of Saint Louis, we shall probably not err on the side of presumption in considering it apocryphal, though Monsignor Capel's judgment of the matter might be different; and to that I bow -- wow.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • OBSESSED, p.p. Vexed by an evil spirit, like the Gadarene swine and other critics. Obsession was once more common than it is now. Arasthus tells of a peasant who was occupied by a different devil for every day in the week, and on Sundays by two. They were frequently seen, always walking in his shadow, when he had one, but were finally driven away by the village notary, a holy man; but they took the peasant with them, for he vanished utterly. A devil thrown out of a woman by the Archbishop of Rheims ran through the trees, pursued by a hundred persons, until the open country was reached, where by a leap higher than a church spire he escaped into a bird. A chaplain in Cromwell's army exorcised a soldier's obsessing devil by throwing the soldier into the water, when the devil came to the surface. The soldier, unfortunately, did not.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • INNATE, adj. Natural, inherent -- as innate ideas, that is to say, ideas that we are born with, having had them previously imparted to us. The doctrine of innate ideas is one of the most admirable faiths of philosophy, being itself an innate idea and therefore inaccessible to disproof, though Locke foolishly supposed himself to have given it "a black eye." Among innate ideas may be mentioned the belief in one's ability to conduct a newspaper, in the greatness of one's country, in the superiority of one's civilization, in the importance of one's personal affairs and in the interesting nature of one's diseases.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • OBSOLETE, adj. No longer used by the timid. Said chiefly of words. A word which some lexicographer has marked obsolete is ever thereafter an object of dread and loathing to the fool writer, but if it is a good word and has no exact modern equivalent equally good, it is good enough for the good writer. Indeed, a writer's attitude toward "obsolete" words is as true a measure of his literary ability as anything except the character of his work. A dictionary of obsolete and obsolescent words would not only be singularly rich in strong and sweet parts of speech; it would add large possessions to the vocabulary of every competent writer who might not happen to be a competent reader.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • J is a consonant in English, but some nations use it as a vowel -- than which nothing could be more absurd. Its original form, which has been but slightly modified, was that of the tail of a subdued dog, and it was not a letter but a character, standing for a Latin verb, _jacere_, "to throw," because when a stone is thrown at a dog the dog's tail assumes that shape. This is the origin of the letter, as expounded by the renowned Dr. Jocolpus Bumer, of the University of Belgrade, who established his conclusions on the subject in a work of three quarto volumes and committed suicide on being reminded that the j in the Roman alphabet had originally no curl.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • K is a consonant that we get from the Greeks, but it can be traced away back beyond them to the Cerathians, a small commercial nation inhabiting the peninsula of Smero. In their tongue it was called _Klatch_, which means "destroyed." The form of the letter was originally precisely that of our H, but the erudite Dr. Snedeker explains that it was altered to its present shape to commemorate the destruction of the great temple of Jarute by an earthquake, _circa_ 730 B.C. This building was famous for the two lofty columns of its portico, one of which was broken in half by the catastrophe, the other remaining intact. As the earlier form of the letter is supposed to have been suggested by these pillars, so, it is thought by the great antiquary, its later was adopted as a simple and natural -- not to say touching -- means of keeping the calamity ever in the national memory. It is not known if the name of the letter was altered as an additional mnemonic, or if the name was always _Klatch_ and the destruction one of nature's pums. As each theory seems probable enough, I see no objection to believing both -- and Dr. Snedeker arrayed himself on that side of the question.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • The link between ideas and action is rarely direct. There is almost always an intermediate step in which the idea is overcome. De Tocqueville points out that it is at times when passions start to govern human affairs that ideas are most obviously translated into political action. The translation of ideas into action is usually in the hands of people least likely to follow rational motives. Hence, it is that action is often the nemesis of ideas, and sometimes of the men who formulate them. One of the marks of the truly vigorous society is the ability to dispense with passion as a midwife of action - the ability to pass directly from thought to action.

    - Eric Hoffer
  • How is one to live a moral and compassionate existence when one is fully aware of the blood, the horror inherent in life, when one finds darkness not only in one's culture but within oneself? If there is a stage at which an individual life becomes truly adult, it must be when one grasps the irony in its unfolding and accepts responsibility for a life lived in the midst of such paradox. One must live in the middle of contradiction, because if all contradiction were eliminated at once life would collapse. There are simply no answers to some of the great pressing questions. You continue to live them out, making your life a worthy expression of leaning into the light.

    - Barry Lopez
  • REDEMPTION, n. Deliverance of sinners from the penalty of their sin, through their murder of the deity against whom they sinned. The doctrine of Redemption is the fundamental mystery of our holy religion, and whoso believeth in it shall not perish, but have everlasting life in which to try to understand it.We must awake Man's spirit from his sin,And take some special measure for redeeming it;Though hard indeed the task to get it inAmong the angels any way but teaming it,Or purify it otherwise than steaming it.I'm awkward at Redemption -- a beginner:My method is to crucify the sinner.Golgo Brone

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • What greater stupidity can be imagined than that of calling jewels, silver, and gold 'precious,' and earth and soil 'base'? People who do this ought to remember that if there were as great a scarcity of soil as of jewels or precious metals, there would not be a prince who would not spend a bushel of diamonds and rubies and a cartload of gold just to have enough earth to plant a jasmine in a little pot, or to sow an orange seed and watch it sprout, grow, and produce its handsome leaves, its fragrant flowers, and fine fruit. It is scarcity and plenty that make the vulgar take things to be precious or worthless; they call a diamond very beautiful because it is like pure water, and then would not exchange one for ten barrels of water.

    - Galileo Galilei
  • LAND, n. A part of the earth's surface, considered as property. The theory that land is property subject to private ownership and control is the foundation of modern society, and is eminently worthy of the superstructure. Carried to its logical conclusion, it means that some have the right to prevent others from living; for the right to own implies the right exclusively to occupy; and in fact laws of trespass are enacted wherever property in land is recognized. It follows that if the whole area of _terra firma_ is owned by A, B and C, there will be no place for D, E, F and G to be born, or, born as trespassers, to exist.A life on the ocean wave,A home on the rolling deep,For the spark the nature gaveI have there the right to keep.They give me the cat-o'-nineWhenever I go ashore.Then ho! for the flashing brine --I'm a natural commodore!Dodle

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • BEG, v. To ask for something with an earnestness proportioned to the belief that it will not be given.Who is that, father?A mendicant, child,Haggard, morose, and unaffable -- wild!See how he glares through the bars of his cell!With Citizen Mendicant all is not well.Why did they put him there, father?BecauseObeying his belly he struck at the laws.His belly?Oh, well, he was starving, my boy --A state in which, doubtless, there's little of joy.No bite had he eaten for days, and his cryWas "Bread!" ever "Bread!"What's the matter with pie?With little to wear, he had nothing to sell;To beg was unlawful -- improper as well.Why didn't he work?He would even have done that,But men said: "Get out!" and the State remarked: "Scat!"I mention these incidents merely to showThat the vengeance he took was uncommonly low.Revenge, at the best, is the act of a Siou,But for trifles --Pray what did bad Mendicant do?Stole two loaves of bread to replenish his lackAnd tuck out the belly that clung to his back.Is that _all_ father dear?There's little to tell:They sent him to jail, and they'll send him to -- well,The company's better than here we can boast,And there's --Bread for the needy, dear father?Um -- toast.Atka Mip

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • BAAL, n. An old deity formerly much worshiped under various names. As Baal he was popular with the Phoenicians; as Belus or Bel he had the honor to be served by the priest Berosus, who wrote the famous account of the Deluge; as Babel he had a tower partly erected to his glory on the Plain of Shinar. From Babel comes our English word "babble." Under whatever name worshiped, Baal is the Sun-god. As Beelzebub he is the god of flies, which are begotten of the sun's rays on the stagnant water. In Physicia Baal is still worshiped as Bolus, and as Belly he is adored and served with abundant sacrifice by the priests of Guttledom.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • BABE or BABY, n. A misshapen creature of no particular age, sex, or condition, chiefly remarkable for the violence of the sympathies and antipathies it excites in others, itself without sentiment or emotion. There have been famous babes; for example, little Moses, from whose adventure in the bulrushes the Egyptian hierophants of seven centuries before doubtless derived their idle tale of the child Osiris being preserved on a floating lotus leaf.Ere babes were inventedThe girls were contended.Now man is tormentedUntil to buy babes he has squanderedHis money. And so I have ponderedThis thing, and thought may be'T were better that BabyThe First had been eagled or condored.Ro Amil

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • To be, or not to be: that is the question:Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to sufferThe slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep:No more; and by a sleep to say we endThe heartache and the thousand natural shocksThat flesh is heir to,--'t is a consummationDevoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub:For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,Must give us pause: there's the respectThat makes calamity of so long life;For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,The insolence of office and the spurnsThat patient merit of the unworthy takes,When he himself might his quietus makeWith a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,To grunt and sweat under a weary life,But that the dread of something after death,The undiscover'd country from whose bournNo traveller returns, puzzles the willAnd makes us rather bear those ills we haveThan fly to others that we know not of?Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;And thus the native hue of resolutionIs sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,And enterprises of great pith and momentWith this regard their currents turn awry,And lose the name of action.

    - William Shakespeare
  • Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.

    - Groucho Marx
  • SATAN, n. One of the Creator's lamentable mistakes, repented in sashcloth and axes. Being instated as an archangel, Satan made himself multifariously objectionable and was finally expelled from Heaven. Halfway in his descent he paused, bent his head in thought a moment and at last went back. "There is one favor that I should like to ask," said he."Name it.""Man, I understand, is about to be created. He will need laws.""What, wretch! you his appointed adversary, charged from the dawn of eternity with hatred of his soul -- you ask for the right to make his laws?""Pardon; what I have to ask is that he be permitted to make them himself."It was so ordered.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • MAD, adj. Affected with a high degree of intellectual independence; not conforming to standards of thought, speech and action derived by the conformants from study of themselves; at odds with the majority; in short, unusual. It is noteworthy that persons are pronounced mad by officials destitute of evidence that themselves are sane. For illustration, this present (and illustrious) lexicographer is no firmer in the faith of his own sanity than is any inmate of any madhouse in the land; yet for aught he knows to the contrary, instead of the lofty occupation that seems to him to be engaging his powers he may really be beating his hands against the window bars of an asylum and declaring himself Noah Webster, to the innocent delight of many thoughtless spectators.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • You don’t have to get a job that makes others feel comfortable about what they perceive as your success. You don’t have to explain what you plan to do with your life. You don’t have to justify your education by demonstrating its financial rewards. You don’t have to maintain an impeccable credit score. Anyone who expects you to do any of those things has no sense of history or economics or science or the arts.You have to pay your own electric bill. You have to be kind. You have to give it all you got. You have to find people who love you truly and love them back with the same truth.But that’s all.

    - Sugar
  • But where, says some, is the king of America? I’ll tell you friend, he reigns above, and doth not make havoc of mankind like the royal brute of Britain, Yet that we may not appear to be defective even in earthly honors, let a day be solemnly set apart for proclaiming the charter; let it be brought forth placed on the divine law, the word of God; let a crown be place thereon, by which the world may know, that so far as we approve of monarchy, that in America THE LAW IS KING. For as in absolute governments the King is law, so in free countries the law ought to be king; and there ought to be no other.

    - Thomas Paine
  • Part of the ability to keep writing over the years comes down to living with the expectation of disappointment. It's the exact opposite of capitalism. In capitalism you want your business to succeed, and to the degree it does your energy increases, and you go out and buy an even bigger business. In writing it's almost the exact opposite. You just want to keep the store going. You're not going to do as well this year as last year probably, but nonetheless let's keep the store going. What ruins most writers of talent is that they don't get enough experience, so their novels tend to develop a certain paranoid perfection.

    - Norman Mailer
  • CIRCUS, n. A place where horses, ponies and elephants are permitted to see men, women and children acting the fool.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • HOMOEOPATHY, n. A school of medicine midway between Allopathy and Christian Science. To the last both the others are distinctly inferior, for Christian Science will cure imaginary diseases, and they can not.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • PAINTING, n. The art of protecting flat surfaces from the weather and exposing them to the critic.Formerly, painting and sculpture were combined in the same work: the ancients painted their statues. The only present alliance between the two arts is that the modern painter chisels his patrons.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • BAPTISM, n. A sacred rite of such efficacy that he who finds himself in heaven without having undergone it will be unhappy forever. It is performed with water in two ways -- by immersion, or plunging, and by aspersion, or sprinkling.But whether the plan of immersionIs better than simple aspersionLet those immersedAnd those aspersedDecide by the Authorized Version,And by matching their agues tertian.G.J.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • SATIETY, n. The feeling that one has for the plate after he has eaten its contents, madam.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • RELIGION, n. A daughter of Hope and Fear, explaining to Ignorance the nature of the Unknowable."What is your religion my son?" inquired the Archbishop of Rheims."Pardon, monseigneur," replied Rochebriant; "I am ashamed of it.""Then why do you not become an atheist?""Impossible! I should be ashamed of atheism.""In that case, monsieur, you should join the Protestants."

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • Things are only impossible until they're not.

    - Hannah Louise Shearer
  • It's not the critic who counts. Not the man who points out how the doer of deeds might have done them better. Instead, the credit belongs to the man in the arena whose face is marred by sweat and blood and tears.

    - Theodore Roosevelt
  • TAIL, n. The part of an animal's spine that has transcended its natural limitations to set up an independent existence in a world of its own. Excepting in its foetal state, Man is without a tail, a privation of which he attests an hereditary and uneasy consciousness by the coat-skirt of the male and the train of the female, and by a marked tendency to ornament that part of his attire where the tail should be, and indubitably once was. This tendency is most observable in the female of the species, in whom the ancestral sense is strong and persistent. The tailed men described by Lord Monboddo are now generally regarded as a product of an imagination unusually susceptible to influences generated in the golden age of our pithecan past.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • A hat should be taken off when you greet a lady and left off for the rest of your life. Nothing looks more stupid than a hat.

    - P. J. O'Rourke
  • The case has, in some respects, been not entirely devoid of interest.

    - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  • HOUSE, n. A hollow edifice erected for the habitation of man, rat, mouse, beelte, cockroach, fly, mosquito, flea, bacillus and microbe. _House of Correction_, a place of reward for political and personal service, and for the detention of offenders and appropriations. _House of God_, a building with a steeple and a mortgage on it. _House-dog_, a pestilent beast kept on domestic premises to insult persons passing by and appal the hardy visitor. _House-maid_, a youngerly person of the opposing sex employed to be variously disagreeable and ingeniously unclean in the station in which it has pleased God to place her.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • NOSE, n. The extreme outpost of the face. From the circumstance that great conquerors have great noses, Getius, whose writings antedate the age of humor, calls the nose the organ of quell. It has been observed that one's nose is never so happy as when thrust into the affairs of others, from which some physiologists have drawn the inference that the nose is devoid of the sense of smell.There's a man with a Nose,And wherever he goesThe people run from him and shout:"No cotton have weFor our ears if so beHe blow that interminous snout!"So the lawyers appliedFor injunction. "Denied,"Said the Judge: "the defendant prefixion,Whate'er it portend,Appears to transcendThe bounds of this court's jurisdiction."Arpad Singiny

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • INSCRIPTION, n. Something written on another thing. Inscriptions are of many kinds, but mostly memorial, intended to commemorate the fame of some illustrious person and hand down to distant ages the record of his services and virtues. To this class of inscriptions belongs the name of John Smith, penciled on the Washington monument. Following are examples of memorial inscriptions on tombstones: (See EPITAPH.)"In the sky my soul is found,And my body in the ground.By and by my body'll riseTo my spirit in the skies,Soaring up to Heaven's gate.1878.""Sacred to the memory of Jeremiah Tree. Cut down May 9th, 1862,aged 27 yrs. 4 mos. and 12 ds. Indigenous.""Affliction sore long time she boar,Phisicians was in vain,Till Deth released the dear deceasedAnd left her a remain.Gone to join Ananias in the regions of bliss.""The clay that rests beneath this stoneAs Silas Wood was widely known.Now, lying here, I ask what goodIt was to let me be S. Wood.O Man, let not ambition trouble you,Is the advice of Silas W.""Richard Haymon, of Heaven. Fell to Earth Jan. 20, 1807, and had the dust brushed off him Oct. 3, 1874."

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • PAST, n. That part of Eternity with some small fraction of which we have a slight and regrettable acquaintance. A moving line called the Present parts it from an imaginary period known as the Future. These two grand divisions of Eternity, of which the one is continually effacing the other, are entirely unlike. The one is dark with sorrow and disappointment, the other bright with prosperity and joy. The Past is the region of sobs, the Future is the realm of song. In the one crouches Memory, clad in sackcloth and ashes, mumbling penitential prayer; in the sunshine of the other Hope flies with a free wing, beckoning to temples of success and bowers of ease. Yet the Past is the Future of yesterday, the Future is the Past of to-morrow. They are one -- the knowledge and the dream.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • SCARIFICATION, n. A form of penance practised by the mediaeval pious. The rite was performed, sometimes with a knife, sometimes with a hot iron, but always, says Arsenius Asceticus, acceptably if the penitent spared himself no pain nor harmless disfigurement. Scarification, with other crude penances, has now been superseded by benefaction. The founding of a library or endowment of a university is said to yield to the penitent a sharper and more lasting pain than is conferred by the knife or iron, and is therefore a surer means of grace. There are, however, two grave objections to it as a penitential method: the good that it does and the taint of justice.

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • SOPHISTRY, n. The controversial method of an opponent, distinguished from one's own by superior insincerity and fooling. This method is that of the later Sophists, a Grecian sect of philosophers who began by teaching wisdom, prudence, science, art and, in brief, whatever men ought to know, but lost themselves in a maze of quibbles and a fog of words.His bad opponent's "facts" he sweeps away,And drags his sophistry to light of day;Then swears they're pushed to madness who resortTo falsehood of so desperate a sort.Not so; like sods upon a dead man's breast,He lies most lightly who the least is pressed.Polydore Smith

    - Ambrose Bierce
  • It's a job that's never started that takes the longest to finish.

    - J. R. R. Tolkien
  • I take the view, and always have, that if you cannot say what you are going to say in twenty minutes you ought to go away and write a book about it.

    - Lord Brabazon
  • Last week, I went to Philadelphia, but it was closed.

    - W. C. Fields
  • I always keep a supply of stimulant handy in case I see a snake--which I also keep handy.

    - W. C. Fields
  • The world makes you into a bitch, no matter how quietly you go, so you may as well go kicking and screaming.

    - Roseanne Barr
  • Aristotle maintained that women have fewer teeth tha